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Pizor (London, England)
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Case Logic KSB101 Sling Backpack for DSLR Camera
Case Logic KSB101 Sling Backpack for DSLR Camera
Price: 94.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally! An excellent camera bag, 27 Dec 2013
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The Case Logic KSB101 Sling Backpack is an excellent bag for the photographer who wants to take a limited amount of gear with them while out on a shoot. The bag itself is surprisingly lightweight and extremely versatile. It does, however, function a little differently from a traditional backpack. Keep in mind, a traditional backpack is usually like a big bucket which is only accessible from the top. The Case Logic, flips that concept completely upside down. There are so many ways to access this bag, it's almost hard to describe! I think the easiest way will be to describe it as it's shipped.

When I first opened the bag, I noticed it has two main openings. The top most zipper opens up to a somewhat deep pouch, but does not access what I would call the heart of the bag (I'll come back to this part). This is a nice spot for accessories. There is a baggy pouch on one side of the compartment and a zippered pouch which is rather tight fitting on the zippered flap. On the small tag that comes on the bag, this area is shown holding your instruction manual to your camera, a granola bar, your wallet, etc.

The second zippered opening accesses the heart of the bag. The inside is lined with a bright yellow almost fleece like fabric. The yellow is an excellent choice because there's nothing worse than reaching into a black lined bag and not being able to see anything inside. The bright yellow makes everything inside highly visible. In this area are your standard padded, velcro walls. Everything is moveable so you can really shape the bag to fit your needs. So how is this camera bag different from every other camera backpack on the market? Because of it's side access. The Case Logic is both a backpack and a sling bag so if you choose to make it a sling (you can do either left or right shoulder, whichever you prefer), you can access your camera not just from the main front zipper but from the side smaller access areas. There are two zippers on either side of the bag. They are both identical so there's no difference if you choose to have a left shoulder sling or a right shoulder. The zipper access and pouches are the same. The top zipper reveals a small but still useful pocket good for holding things like filters, memory cards, lens covers, etc. The lower zipper is actually an access point to the heart of the bag meaning if you use your bag as a sling and want to grab your camera, instead of taking the bag off your back and opening the main compartment, all you have to do is slide your bag around so the bag is now in front of you rather than behind you, unzip the little side access point and reach right in and grab your camera! Super simple, super fast and Bob's your uncle.

Again, the inside is completely flexible so you can move the padded walls to highlight side access or if you prefer the more traditional backpack approach, you can support that as well. Inside this bag I was able to fit 1 Nikon 3100 body without lens, 1 Nikon 5100 with it's kit lens attached as well as my 70-300mm lens. Not bad! In the other pouches and pockets I had a mini tripod, a small cleaning kit, a macro lens, some cleaning fluid, a lens hood, a small led flashlight and the raincoat that comes with the bag and still had plenty of room for other accessories. The most surprising bit was that with all of that, the bag wasn't that heavy. The bag itself only weighs 2.53 lbs (1.15 kg) which isn't bad for a decent camera bag.

Getting back to that top pouch that doesn't reach the heart of the bag - the Case Logic is so versatile that if you move some of the padded walls, you can get rid of this top pouch all together making the inside of the bag much larger. This bag is so versatile that I think it's going to take me awhile to mold it into the exact way I want it. I've set it up while in my den, but I think it won't be until I use it on a few shoots that I will really figure out what works and what doesn't, but I find it exciting that I have so many options and choices to discover what makes it MY bag and what makes it work for me. Even better, as my needs or photo shoots change, this bag can definitely change with me. I highly recommend this bag!!!!!!


1000 Ultimate Adventures (Lonely Planet Travel Reference)
1000 Ultimate Adventures (Lonely Planet Travel Reference)
by Lonely Planet
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.19

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is so cool!!!!, 27 Dec 2013
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Lonely Planet's 1000 Ultimate Adventures is 349 pages of fun. In full colour, the look is like a magazine with page after page of glossy photos and info. It's a heavy book, but with its short, squat size, it's perfect to hold or throw in the back of your bag for a days adventure.

The table of contents is broken down into dozens of subjects helping the reader to narrow down their specific interest. Topics range from Sensational Snowshoe Escapades to Best Surf Breaks for Beginners; from Ultimate Border Crossings to Iconic European Adventures. They even have Best Adventures in the Buff, Girls Only Adventures, Family Friendly Adventures and even Rousing Reads for Armchair Adventurers. You may think this last category is a cop out, but actually, it's pretty helpful. It gives 10 excellent travel books, some you may already know, but several are perhaps more obscure with older copyrights yet extremely interesting.

Adventures range, on average, between 2 and 4 pages with at least 1 excellent color photo paired with almost every adventure topic (best armchair reads and adventure movies didn't seem to have photos). So what's covered with each topic? To me, the copy feels very much like what you find in a magazine covering The 10 Best... Each topic has around 10 suggestions. Though info is obviously given as to why it's listed here, you won't get details about how to get there, costs on travel, hotels, etc. But don't get my wrong, this is not a bare bones travel guide, either. Each blurb highlights the adventure found, be it kayaking in Greenland or riding the rails in Russia. Underneath each blurb is a little bonus info such as useful websites or how experienced an adventurer you need to be to attempt this adventure.

Whether you're planning an adventure for yourself or just like dreaming of one, Lonely Planet's 1000 Ultimate Adventures is an excellent resource as well as a great book to keep on your coffee table and flip through whenever you want to escape the monotony of your everyday life.


Mr Men Stories Volume 2 (Vintage Beeb)
Mr Men Stories Volume 2 (Vintage Beeb)
by Roger Hargreaves
Edition: Audio CD
Price: 5.59

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent CD, 5 Dec 2013
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This CD was exactly what I was expecting. It sounds just like the Mr. Men cartoon on TV. What I like about this is that it's a quiet CD without a lot of background noises, sound FX, music and other noises to take away from the stories themselves. If you're a Mr. Men fan, you will NOT be disappointed with this CD. I enjoyed listening to it as much as my 5 year old and even my 9 year old!


BRAINtastic Version 2 Word Skills Two
BRAINtastic Version 2 Word Skills Two
Offered by Avanquest Software Publishing Ltd
Price: 16.99

4.0 out of 5 stars This series is always a winner, 20 Jun 2013
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
We have quite a few of the Braintastic series. They're all very good money for value. My daughter has enjoyed all of them and this one was no exception.


Aves Air Handheld Digital Radio
Aves Air Handheld Digital Radio

4.0 out of 5 stars Not sure about this one, 15 Mar 2013
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The Aves Air handheld looks like a nice little, very lightweight radio. My only problem with it is I picked up and then left for the US. I thought I would be able to listen to some DAB stations or at the very least, some FM stations. It wasn't until I opened the box that I read the US doesn't broadcast in DAB. Apparently, only some countries do. But no worries, I figured I could at least use the FM part of the radio. First I tried it in the basement and couldn't get any stations so I moved to the ground floor. I was quickly able to pick up a few stations. The sound quality is excellent! I'm not a huge fan of the ear buds that come with the radio, but they're easily replaceable.

The scrolling text is painfully slow. The back light is nice but doesn't stay lit for very long. Hitting the info button while listening to FM sometimes shows information, sometimes nothing comes across.

Countries that broadcast DAB: UK, Australia, Belgium, Brunei, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Greece, Hungary, Hong Kong, Italy, Malta, Holland, Norway, Singapore and Switzerland.

It's frustrating the radio doesn't receive any stations while in the basement, which is where I wanted to use it most, but it does have a nice sound. For what it is, though, it seems fairly pricey. All it is is a pocket digital FM radio. I would expect to pay a lot less. Yet it is a nice pocket radio overall.


Not For Parents How to be a World Explorer (Lonely Planet)
Not For Parents How to be a World Explorer (Lonely Planet)
by Lonely Planet
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 9.09

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is very cool!, 18 Jan 2013
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The Lonely Planet book How To Be a World Explorer is very similar to the series the Daring Book for Girls and the Dangerous Book for Boys. My daughter likes both of those so I thought she'd like this, too. I wasn't wrong, she loves it! The nice thing I immediately noticed, in comparing to the 2 previous books I just mentioned, is that they don't comment on whether or not the book should be for boys or girls. It's simply for everyone, which I prefer.

A lot of the book falls under the category of my kid will never need to know any of this, however, a little bit of knowledge can go a long way. They give the example of a plane that was hit by lightning while flying over the Amazon jungle. A 17 year old miraculously survived the 2 mile fall but was then stuck in the middle of the Amazon. Her father had taught her to find a stream and follow it downhill because it will most likely lead to a river which will lead to people. The girl did just that and therefore made it to safety. This book is filled with similar knowledge that you most likely won't use on a regular basis, however, you may someday find yourself in that rare event where you can say, "I know what to do if I fall in quicksand [or a similar substance] because I read it in a book!" H

How To Be a World Explorer is full of useful, and colorfully illustrated, info on how to survive in all of the different geographies our world has to offer.Though some of the tips you most likely will never need (how to wrestle a crocodile), others are actually quite handy, such as The chapter on navigation. In addition to it teaching you how to read a map or how to find North using nature, it gives plenty of hands on exercises that you can make and experiment with yourself. These can definitely be useful skills that everyone could use!

I also like how they intermixed little tidbits of history with the lessons they're teaching. For instance the tidbit about the girl who survived falling out of a plane was interesting on its own, however, it was actually illustrating the lesson of how to remove botfly larva from your skin (her skin was infested by the time she had found help).

When I first found this book, I assumed it was Lonely Planet jumping on the success of the Daring Book for Girls and Boys series. It is very similar, however, I think they did a better job of it. The illustrations are in the style of an intrepid explorer's journal filled with pen and ink pictures. Instead of dense text (like the Daring series), the layouts are broken up a bit more with plenty of colourful illustrations as well as a bit more white space which doesn't make the book feel too daunting or intimidating, yet it's still chock full of wonderful information. I would highly recommend this book to both kids and adults. It's a wonderful read if you only have time for a few pages but just as much fun if you have all afternoon. If you have time to build your own compass and other devices they lay out for you, then even better. Anyone who has ever dreamed of going on a world adventure would really enjoy this book as would adventurous kids who have great backyard imaginations. I was delightfully surprised by this book. I really don't think anyone would be disappointed by it.


The Goblin King (Sophie and the Shadow Woods, Book 1)
The Goblin King (Sophie and the Shadow Woods, Book 1)
by Linda Chapman
Edition: Paperback
Price: 4.79

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not bad but not great, 13 April 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I asked my 7 year old daughter (reading 9-11 fiction) to help me out with this review. She read most of the book and said it was good but not great. She said she didn't like the fact that the grandfather was mean or that there was some somewhat scary parts in the book, but she did like that it was an adventure and it was easy to read and easy to get into.

I briefly read parts of the book and thought it was very well written and a nice change of pace from the standard girly fairy books. For one, Sophie, the main character, is a tomboy. This appealed to me (and would've when I was 7 too), but possibly not to my daughter who is a bit girly and a bit of a tomboy. So I guess that can be a plus for some girls or a minus for others. I thought the plot was more interesting then the rehashed plots of the Rainbow Fairies and well developed. I would say if you have a daughter or know a little girl who likes adventures and fairies but isn't overly girly, then this is a safe book for them to enjoy.


NERDS (National Espionage, Rescue, and Defense Society) (NERDS - book 1)
NERDS (National Espionage, Rescue, and Defense Society) (NERDS - book 1)
by Michael Buckley
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.17

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fun read for the 9+ crowd, 24 Mar 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I bought this book for my 7 year old who is a very advanced reader. She loves math, science and technology so I thought she would really enjoy NERDS. I was surprised to find that not only the words but the concepts were quite difficult for my daughter to read and understand. After I read a chapter to her, I realized it's obviously a book for older children. I'm sure in another year or so, my daughter will really enjoy it.

NERDS is a very fun look at the world of spies and espionage. It talks about ice cold killers, kidnappers, terrorists and the like, but it does so in a very tongue and cheek sort of way. I didn't want my 7 year old to learn about these things (terrorists, bombing plots, murderers), but for an older child who's already seen a few Hollywood movies, they should find the subject matter rather fun. The whole book is about empowering kids to do what they can in the spy world, a little like in the movie Spy Kids.

The author, Michael Buckley, definitely knows how to write books for boys. There's plenty of gross stuff in the book to keep kids gagging for ages. Though the book is 306 pages, don't be put off. The paper itself is rather thick, but there are plenty of cool computer style illustrations to break it up a bit. Don't get me wrong, there are very few pictures in the book, but there are plenty of computer access screens at the beginning of each chapter. These help the reader progress to full NERD status.

All in all it's a very fun read filled with kid antics and plenty of gross out material, but definitely not for younger kids.


BRAINtastic Version 2 Maths TWO
BRAINtastic Version 2 Maths TWO
Price: 16.99

5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent math program for kids, 9 Mar 2011
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
My 7 year old daughter has several of the Braintastic programs and she loves them all. I don't think you can go wrong with any of them. Like all of their software, it's age related and tied to all of the Key Stages. What's great about that is that you know your child will be improving on what they're already learning in school. But what's great about the Braintastic series is that it's not just for one year, it's for several so your child can start at age 7 and the program will be good up to age 9. Not bad, especially when you consider the price.

So how does it play? When you start the program, you're asked your age and then what level you want to start with. I set my daughter to 7 years old, level 2 because she's rather keen on math. A series of questions pop up, one at a time.I can't remember how many come up in each section, but roughly 10 or so. Each question is fairly different from the one before it. So one might be a standard subtraction question followed by a question about fractions. The fractions would be in picture form, not the standard mathematical form so it's easier for the kids to understand it. Some of the questions were practical math while others more standard times tables, adding and subtracting. The further you go, the harder the questions. Once you reach the end of a section, the child is rewarded with a mini game. In Braintastic Maths v2, the mini games are Bug Whack, Galactic Retrieval Squad and Extreme Fashion. My daughter hasn't played the Galactic Retrieval game yet, but she said the other two were a lot of fun. The bug game is pretty simple, but fun and the Fashion game was surprisingly hard, but still fun.

As I said before, you can't go wrong with any of the programs from this company. They've thought of every detail. The educational value is outstanding, but so is the fun factor. My daughter was jumping up and down while looking through the Braintastic catalog. She really enjoys all of the programs, but of the two math ones we have, she said she liked Baggin' the Dragon more because it was more like a board game. Maths v2 is more of a straight forward math program whereas Baggin' the Dragon is a math program disguised as a family board game. But saying that, they're both excellent and I highly recommend them both.


The Report
The Report
by Jessica Kane
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.14

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful read!, 9 Mar 2011
This review is from: The Report (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I very rarely read WWII fiction. I've read so much on the subject I find it's something I now don't like to think about, but when I came across The Report by Jessica Francis Kane, I was intrigued.If you've looked around the Amazon page, I'm sure you've already discovered that the book is about a tragedy that happens in London during the war. I won't rehash what everyone else has already said about the basic plot. I will, however, discuss the tone of the book.

The Report is what I would call a very quiet book. It's not filled with too much description or too many characters or too much background info. It has just the right amount of everything in it. Though there are several characters to keep track of and the book bounces back and forth between the past and the present, it's never confusing. It was written in a very clear style but not cold or simplistic. There's a note of honesty throughout, as if the author is trying to do justice to the victims of the accident. But saying that, it's never maudlin. Ms. Kane has a knack of floating between honesty and sincerity but never touching on a cold 'just the facts' rendition of what may have happened.

I won't give away the ending, but I will say you approach the truth in the right amount of time. Nothing is drawn out for the sake of literature and nothing is crammed down your throat. The story is told in the right time and delicately and rather tenderly revealed. By the time you reach the end, you quietly nod your head and say, "I understand now."

I can't say it's a particularly happy book or that I felt happier after reading it, but I certainly did enjoy it and am the better for doing so. The Report is a wonderfully written book of what may have happened on 3 March 1943. Of course, we'll really never know what did happen, but this was an enjoyable glimpse into the era and what may have happened. It was all captured perfectly. I highly recommend it.


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