Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Summer Savings Up to 25% Off Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Oasis Listen in Prime Shop now Learn more
Profile for A reader > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by A reader
Top Reviewer Ranking: 4,515,748
Helpful Votes: 30

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
A reader

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Banged Up
Banged Up
by Ronnie Thompson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Lies, 3 April 2014
This review is from: Banged Up (Paperback)
The cover blurb says that former prison officer Ronnie Thompson has 'teamed up' with someone called Davey Sommers in order to write this book. The book is also labelled as non-fiction. Both of these statements are untrue. Thompson then admits in his 'Author's note' that Davey Sommers is actually a figment of his imagination, an 'amalgamation' of people he has encountered over the years. That would make it fiction. It's very poor fiction too: endless violence, drugs and crime are potentially very exciting yet under Thompson's leaden hand the action becomes anaesthetically dull.
I saw the price for a used copy is one pence. You'd have to a billionaire to not consider this over-priced.


Soul Crew: The Inside Story of a Soccer Hooligan Gang
Soul Crew: The Inside Story of a Soccer Hooligan Gang
by David Jones
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One would hesistate to read the lines themselves, but between...now there's a tale..., 7 Jun. 2011
A well-documented and (presumably) well-edited tale of the coming of age of two young men. It's clearly aimed at a particular community of reader though.
Both male authors describe a slow change that takes place in their lives around adolescence. Previously interested in the game of football itself, they start to feel and nurture a deep interest in the clothes other boys are wearing (described here in great detail)at the match, their hairstyles, whose appearance is the most satisfying to the eye and so on. Inevitably this leads to physical contact.
They find this physical contact extremely exciting and gratifying and seek to repeat the experience every weekend. At the start, these brief encounters are with total strangers and are both short-lived and aggressive, as is the norm. But, slowly, as the lads' network expands the trysts become more organised and arrangements to meet and engage are made with other well turned out gents from around the country.
Equally inevitably, the police are keeping a watchful and disapproving eye. So from having it off in front of everyone at a stadium, the physical side of things has to develop in semi-private circumstances: back alleys and tube stations become the venue for these disapproved of physical deeds. Still they crave more.
As with Oscar Wilde, the police continue to intrude but by this stage our well-presented, strong, masculine gents have found the rave scene. Dark rooms, different clothes to talk about and yet more physical proximity mmmmm.....


The Damage Done: Twelve Years Of Hell In A Bangkok Prison
The Damage Done: Twelve Years Of Hell In A Bangkok Prison
by W Fellows
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

16 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Self Pity, 4 Dec. 2007
Although Fellows says he isn't looking for sympathy, it becomes rather clear that this is exactly what he wants. He adopts the rather odd posture that the drugs he was involved in smuggling may not have caused any misery at all. Let's not forget that this last mission was one of many. He was instrumental in the misery of others and was caught. His victims also suffered- he doesn't treat them with much regard at all. The prison was pretty horrible, true enough but then so is being a heroin addict. As Fellows eventually discovered- our hearts bleed. Can't do the time don't do the crime, Warren.
Comment Comments (11) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 8, 2012 8:40 PM BST


Grafters: The Inside Story of the Wide Awake Firm, Europe's Most Prolific Sneak Thieves
Grafters: The Inside Story of the Wide Awake Firm, Europe's Most Prolific Sneak Thieves
by Colin Blaney
Edition: Paperback

8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Raffles Goes to Lidl, 27 Nov. 2007
Blaney has written a book about his meaningless life of petty theft. He spends the meagre gains on drink and drugs.
The tone suggests derring-do but there is little of that. Blaney admits that the best places to steal money were in supermarkets. The best targets ? Harried young mothers. Sweet.
There's no thought to the harm that's done by taking money/valuables from the poor or those on holiday, Blaney needs that money to drink and buy drugs: what fools we have all been.
Hilariously, later he claims his firm were running like a military operation, before revaling that the military operation spent all day (they did get up early, mind) getting drunk and smoking high strength marijuana. And then mugging and pickpocketing people.
It's also suggested that these snide weasels were somehow 'professional'. Not very professional if you spend 2/3 of your life in jail, is it ?
It goes on like this. He steals. He gets drunk/takes drugs. He has sex with prostitutes. He gets arrested.
I won't spoil the ending for those thrilled by such a squalid, risible existence but suffice to say that he does not end up as a billionaire living on a yacht.
Comment Comments (7) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 18, 2011 2:03 AM BST


Mr Nasty: Misadventures in the Drug World
Mr Nasty: Misadventures in the Drug World
by Cameron White
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misnomer, 28 Sept. 2006
Whilst it's true that Mr Nasty is actually quite an unpleasant chap at the book's beginning, this does not continue for the rest of his story. I would think Mr Victim would be a more appropriate title- the protagonist gets jostled and booted around in drug-related scenarios across the globe learning little that most schoolchildren don't already know and losing every time. His experiences are also quite generic and frankly hard to believe. The underlying message (which he fails to acknowledge) is that drugs may turn you into a bore.


Page: 1