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Mr. S. F. BOWLAND (Sheffield, UK)
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Trust GXT 39 Wireless Gamepad for PC and Playstation 3 (PS3) - Black
Trust GXT 39 Wireless Gamepad for PC and Playstation 3 (PS3) - Black
Price: £32.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't work with some PC games, 2 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This gamepad is fine when it works. Its a good (but expensive) PS3 gamepad. But it only works with some PC games, and not with others. It worked with Remember Me, but Elder Scrolls V, Castlevania, Witcher 2, Metro Last Light all failed to recognise it.

As a PC gamepad, its limited to the point of worthless. Sending it back.


TP-LINK TD-W8980 - N600 Dual Band Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router
TP-LINK TD-W8980 - N600 Dual Band Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router
Offered by Maplin_Webdeals
Price: £54.99

1.0 out of 5 stars Incompatible with Sky, 4 Oct. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Incompatible with Sky Broadband for some reason. TP Link Customer Services could not help at all. Sky Customer Services just told me to send it back and they'd send me a new one. Which I did.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 5, 2013 8:48 PM BST


Bitter Angels
Bitter Angels
by C L Anderson
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £6.60

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Patience will be rewarded, 31 Oct. 2009
This book has a somewhat slow and confusing start, but stick with it and it becomes more enjoyable as it goes along, and has a very satisfying climax.

Set in the distant future, humanity has colonized many worlds. Earth is the centre of the Pax Solaris, struggling to keep hold of the colonies that are rebelling against its rule. The human race is extremely long lived, with immortality itself granted to certain licensed people. The result of this near-immortality has a strong effect on the story.

The focus is on Terese, a woman who is brought out of retirement by the Guardians, an organization dedicated to preserving peace throughout the galaxy - a mission made difficult by their vow to never take a life, not even to save their own. Terese is sent to the Erasmus System, to discover the fate of a murdered comrade and prevent a possible interstellar war.

I was a bit confused at the beginning and through the opening acts. I had a hard time understanding the motivations of some of the characters, as it was a but difficult comprehending the way of thinking of this future society, and their future morality. Crucial details about this society are parcelled out only as they become immediately relevant, rather than earlier when it may have been more useful in understanding why certain things were happening. Because of this, many of the characters seem to be acting completely irrationally, and its only afterwards that I realised what was motivating them.

However, as the story went along and I became accustomed to the workings of the world, I was engrossed and the story became highly enjoyable. The plot twists were intricate and well thought out, and the tension remained high. The Guardians' pacifism, the immortality treatments and its effect on society, and the boiler-pressure situation of an enslaved world threatening to explode into war, made for tense and exciting reading.

Terese herself began the story as a fairly unlikeable protagonist, and I was concerned that I would go through the entire story despising her. But the whole story is background for her own journey of self-discovery and salvation. She became stronger and more real as the story developed, and by the end I was privately cheering for her. A very satisfying conclusion for both the heroine and the story itself.

In summary - a story with a confusing start that takes some personal mental adjustment, but stick with it and you will enjoy it.


Fragment
Fragment
by Warren Fahy
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good beginning and middle, ruined by a stupid last act, 17 Oct. 2009
This review is from: Fragment (Paperback)
This story begins well. It has a solid and fascinating premise - the discovery of a lost island with an ecosystem so invasive and advanced that it threatens all life on Earth. The characters are cliched cutouts, but the island itself is the real star, as the native ecosystem exhibits its bloody savagery, and the weird animals go on a killing spree.

It even manages to play around with some of the standard modern tropes - such as by having the environmentalist be the bad guy. But while it does manage to provide some interesting ethical arguments, they are presented clumsily, with no doubt as to which side the author is on. Still, twin threats of nuclear and ecological devastation successfully maintain tension until about two thirds of the way through, and I was enjoying it.

But then it is ruined, RUINED, by an absolutely STUPID ending. It veers off into a ridiculous and completely implausible tangent, which absolutely shatters any semblance of credibility. Suspension of disbelief was snapped completely, and I ended up rolling my eyes at the ridiculous implausibility of it all. There is only so much impossibility that a reader can be expected to accept, even in trashy sci-fi, and this ending goes much too far, and ends up being just stupid.

One of the worst endings to a book I have ever read. Such a shame, such a waste.


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