Profile for Aaron Thompson > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Aaron Thompson
Top Reviewer Ranking: 4,411,484
Helpful Votes: 77

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Aaron Thompson (Bristol)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The Swords of Night and Day (Skilgannon the Damned 2)
The Swords of Night and Day (Skilgannon the Damned 2)
by David Gemmell
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not so good..., 12 Aug 2004
If you're new to Gemmell, you'll probably love this. However, for 'veteran' fans this is too samey, a mish-mash of his previous books. Part of White Wolf's fascination was the suggestion that great heroes like Druss could be resurrected to fight again, a la King Arthur. It would've been better to have kept this as a tantalising suggestion because the realisation in The Swords of Night and Day does not deliver. Let Druss rest, Mr Gemmell!


Rainmaker
Rainmaker
Offered by EliteDigital UK
Price: 27.95

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor package, 3 Mar 2004
This review is from: Rainmaker (Audio CD)
Rainmaker is a great song, probably one of Maiden's most immediate tracks. However, the B-sides are a joke. The orchestral version of Dance of Death has very little to distinguish it from the album version and More Tea Vicar is a cheap little filler, even worse than the exceptionally dull Pass the Jam b-side from Wildest Dreams. Maiden used to be reliable for decent B-sides, whether live tracks or cover versions, but these are well bellow par. The Rainmaker DVD single is a much better bet, with a great live version of Children of the Damned, but an enhanced CD would have been a lot more handy that a DVD.


Iron Maiden: Rock In Rio [DVD] [2002]
Iron Maiden: Rock In Rio [DVD] [2002]
Dvd ~ Iron Maiden
Price: 10.99

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Concentrate on the bass, Steve..., 14 Feb 2004
As other reviewers have pointed out, Steve Harris' editing leaves a lot to be desired. The occasional fluctuations in volume are niggling, but the main fault is Harris' insistence on cutting so rapidly from one shot to another that your eyes hardly have a chance to focus! The editing also detracts from the experience of the concert; what was obviously an epic spectacle takes on the feel of a pop video designed for 12 year olds with the attention span of a millisecond. This only adds to the impression that Harris should leave production and editing alone. At best his results are workmanlike. Live After Death still reigns supreme! The sooner it makes its appearance on DVD the better, but please don't tamper with it Steve! It's perfect as it is.


Imperial Roman Legionary: AD 161-244 Bk. 2 (Warrior)
Imperial Roman Legionary: AD 161-244 Bk. 2 (Warrior)
by Ross Cowan
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.95

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading, 12 Jan 2004
Most books about the Roman army tend to skip over the chaotic third century AD; everything seems to stop with emperor Severus (AD 193-211) and only pick up with Diocletian in AD 284. That's because the period is chaotic and confused: the legions lost as many battles as they won; the organisation of the legions was changing and ancient ranks were disappearing; legionaries added to the chaos by their willingness to revolt and engage in civil war. But Cowan paints a picture of resilience rather than decline. He highlights the rise of elite legionary corps, explains concisely the reasons for the decline of the traditional legion and rise of the smaller unit of the late empire, and shows how the legions emerged triumphant from the defeats of the mid-third century under the leadership of soldier-emperors like Aurelian (the book actually covers the period up to AD 285).
This is the most exciting book I've read about the Roman army in a long time. It is an essential addition to the library of anyone interested in the Roman army or military history in general.


Caesar's Legion: The Epic Saga of Julius Caesar's Elite Tenth Legion and the Armies of Rome (Roman Legions)
Caesar's Legion: The Epic Saga of Julius Caesar's Elite Tenth Legion and the Armies of Rome (Roman Legions)
by Stephen Dando-Collins
Edition: Hardcover

34 of 44 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Confused and misleading, 5 Jan 2004
This book is let down by one rather serious flaw. The author seems unaware that there was more than one Tenth Legion in the Roman army. Supposedly a history of Julius Caesar's legio X Equestris (later Gemina), the author erroneously attributes to it the history and feats of another legion - X Fretensis. The result is confused and misinformed. Dando-Collins is to be avoided at all costs; either he is just a sloppy researcher or, worse, he has altered the facts to suit himself. If you want the truth read Keppie's Making of the Roman Army or Cowan's Roman Legionary books.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 22, 2013 2:02 PM BST


Roman Legionary: 58 BC - AD 69 (Warrior 71)
Roman Legionary: 58 BC - AD 69 (Warrior 71)
by Ross Cowan
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.88

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The legionary comes to life!, 2 July 2003
This book is quite a surprise. It's a bit more 'academic' than your usual Osprey offering but it's very approachable and squeezes in a mass of information about the legions from Julius Caesar to the emperor Vespasian. The text takes the reader from the establishment of the Imperial legions and organisation, through recruitment (mostly conscripts according to Cowan) and training, equipment (here I learn that the gladius was not a short sword!), and ultimatley on to the best section concerning the legionaries in battle. Quotes from ancient sources give a 'soldier's eye view' of battle from the exchange of missiles, to the charge and collision with the enemy, the rout and taking of booty and and adorning victory monuments with the heads of the enemy.
Excepting a few typos this is a fantastic read. The colour plates illuminate the text superbly (especially the plate concerning the Varian disaster; Cowan informs us that all the legionary eagles taken in AD 9 were later recaptured). Essential for anyone wanting to learn more about the legionary.


Page: 1