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J. Reeve (Bristol, United Kingdom)
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The Summit [DVD]
The Summit [DVD]
Dvd ~ Christine Barnes
Offered by FilmloverUK
Price: 8.78

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well filmed insight into high mountain difficulties, 26 Jun 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Summit [DVD] (DVD)
Originally saw an edited version of this film on the BBC, where approximately 20 minutes was cut out. At the time, I found the film very disjointed, but having watched the complete version it now makes much more sense - even if the storylines do jump around somewhat. The photography was superb, both 'new' and original footage (which just goes to show how good 'home video' cameras can be these days.
The people interviewed are very passionate about their own version of events, even though they have conflicting recollections. This goes to show what the realities are like in high altitude mountaineering. (I found the book No Way Down, about the same events, was just as unclear). My main negative in this respect was the desire by Ger's family to find some kind of 'truth' and the way the Italian Marco was presented at the end - nobody knows the full story of what happened therefore creating 'heroes and villains' seems unfair.
Along with "The Beconing Silence" this is a mountaineering documentary I will revist again and again in years to come.


Two Wheels on my Wagon: A Bicycle Adventure in the Wild West
Two Wheels on my Wagon: A Bicycle Adventure in the Wild West
by Paul Howard
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.69

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Like Bill Bryson on wheels, 15 July 2012
I have a bit of an obsession with books about endurance sports and adventures, so picked this up as one of the few products available about the epic Tour Divide race. I was initially made aware of this event when James Cracknell and Ben Fogle planned to take part, but those expecting this book to reflect the gritty masochism and punishing drive demonstrated by Cracknell's adventures will be disappointed. Howard spends a great deal of time in motels and diners rather roughing it at the more extreme end of the scale.
Paul Howard reminds me of Bill Bryson - rename this book "A Ride in the Woods" and you might get the idea. His observations about American society and the locals he comes across are wry and witty, as are his characterisations of his fellow companions (I would say competitors but they don't have a very strong sense of rivalry). The writing is fluid and easy - I read this in just two days - and never becomes repetitive, even though the type of event would make this a possibility in less capable hands.
Ultimately I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to armchair adventurers, but for those actually into their endurance sports this may seem tame, hence the three stars.


Chasing Legends
Chasing Legends
Price: 7.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 7 Jun 2011
This review is from: Chasing Legends (MP3 Download)
Downloaded this score a couple of weeks ago (based purely on the small sample used in the movie's trailer) and have played it constantly in the car since. Just brilliant.


Why We Run
Why We Run
by Robin Harvie
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.39

10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tries too hard to be literary, 6 May 2011
This review is from: Why We Run (Paperback)
I tried three times to read this book, but ultimately could not get more than a third of the way through. I was hoping that it would be an inspiring read, a la 'Born To Run', but where I found that book's historical interludes to be fascinating, here unfortunately it just broke up the flow. I kept wanting the author to get on with the story of his run, not keep quoting passages from 'Worst Journey in the World'.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 4, 2011 3:20 PM BST


Medal Of Honor
Medal Of Honor

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Shades of Blackhawk Down, 3 Oct 2010
This review is from: Medal Of Honor (MP3 Download)
The composer of this score is a protege of Hans Zimmer, and this music bears a close resemblance to Zimmer's 2001 score for Black Hawk Down, so those who are familiar with the film will know what to expect.
I haven't played the game, but the score contains quite a few 'suspense' cues where one can imagine the special ops soldiers sneaking around, and then a few more bursts of action, but overall the score is more subdued than one might expect from a shoot-em-up, with a hefty dose of ethnic influence.
Recommended, but not to everyone's taste.


Spartan Gold (Fargo Adventure)
Spartan Gold (Fargo Adventure)
by Clive Cussler
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Let down by annoying heroes, 11 Feb 2010
I was looking forward to this latest Cussler offering, as the married couple storyline sounded different to the usual NUMA/OREGON concept of a massive, well equipped organisation. I was wrong! The married couple are millionaires, with all sorts of assistants and resources to help them in their adventure. Not only that, they are so knowledgable/fearless/skilled (eg, expert pilot, expert diver, expert rock climber etc) that they would give James Bond an inferiority complex! Their wisecracking in the face of danger merely comes across as smug, rather than an attempt at levity in a perilous siuation.
As a reader, I found myself unable to identify with the heroes Sam and Remi, which meant that I never really got concerned for them in their life and death adventure. I shall continue to buy the Fargo series of novels as I do with all of Cussler's output, but this was a missed opportunity to do something a little different.


360 Degrees Longitude (Alyson Publications)
360 Degrees Longitude (Alyson Publications)
by John Higham
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A nice idea, but misses the point, 12 Oct 2009
I was looking forward to reading this book, subtitled `One Family's Journey Around the World'. As a family with two children of our own, I was hoping to get some inspiration as to how travel and kids can be combined for an adventure, however I became irritated early on by the author's pre-occupation with comparing everything to the US. Despite his assertion in an early chapter that the intention was "to experience first hand that all we really need is something to eat, something to wear, and somewhere to sleep", he seems insistent on pointing out how things are either unsafe/expensive/unhygienic/inconvenient compared to `back home' (complaining that there's no Wall Mart open in France at 3am).
The idea of linking locations/incidents within the book to Google Earth sounded like a great idea. However, as the blurb on the back cover states: "...see the majesty of the Swiss Alps - without leaving the comfort of your chair", one suspects this will just encourage Americans to stay at home instead of seeing it for themselves: "hey honey, we don't need to go there, this guy's already done it for us!".
I have to admire the author and his family for their bravery, but would have respected them more if they didn't treat the rest of the world as one big theme park. There is very little insight into cultures or meaningful interaction with the locals - either they are `helpful' or `unhelpful' (like the aim of every European citizen should be to help American tourists?).
The book is easy to read, and I would recommend it for armchair travellers, but anyone with a genuine passion for travel will be disappointed by the lack of depth.


G.I. Joe - The Rise Of Cobra
G.I. Joe - The Rise Of Cobra
Offered by records100
Price: 9.29

4.0 out of 5 stars Better than the film deserves, 13 Aug 2009
GI Joe is a disappointing movie, with terrible CGI effects and acting so hammy the cast almost say 'oink', but possibly the only redeeming feature of the film is this score by Silvestri. Unlike his more 'minimalist' action scores of the 90's (Eraser, Long Kiss Goodnight etc), this is big and bombastic. Unlike some of the critics, I quite enjoyed the pieces with the electronic beats and the end credits track is a crowd pleaser, but would agree that the subtler themes get lost beneath the frantic action (hardly surprising given the excessive nature of the movie). Fans of his score for The Mummy Returns should enjoy this, and if a sequel comes around I hope that Silvestri will be able to expand and improve on his work here.


Pulse (Chess Team Adventure)
Pulse (Chess Team Adventure)
by Jeremy Robinson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 17.40

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fans of Rollins should love this!, 10 July 2009
Like James Rollins' Sigma Force novels The Doomsday Key: n/a, this is an action-packed tale combining a secret military unit (in this case the Chess Team) with a scientific/mythical 'device' (here it is a quest for immortality) that they must prevent the villains from using for their own nefarious ends. The depth of characterisation and scientific plausibility is lacking compared to Rollins' best, but the book moves along at lightning speed with plenty of punchy action sequences and a little gore, and keeps you hooked throughout. This is the first hardback from Jeremy Robinson after a number of self-published paperback titles and hopefully marks his big break into the mainstream. I for one will be ordering the next Chess Team novel the minute it appears.


Chasing Che: A Motorcycle Journey in Search of the Guevara Legend
Chasing Che: A Motorcycle Journey in Search of the Guevara Legend
by Patrick Symmes
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and evocative travel writing, 15 April 2009
To me, this book is a great example of what modern 'adventure travel' writing should be. It has been on my shelf for ages, and I put off reading it for a long time which was a mistake. Symmes is an evocative writer, with a fabulous use of decriptive language that never descends into florid meaningless prose. Comparing and contrasting modern South America with recent history through Che's original journey, the book is a blend of biography, politics and travelogue. The people that Symmes meets along the way are genuine and interesting (unlike the enforced eccentrics that many travel books feel the need to resort to in order to make the journey more lively). This may be an inappropriate comparison, but to me this book does for South America what 'Blood River' is to Africa.


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