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Reviews Written by
Henrik Ræder Clausen (Brabrand, Denmark)
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A God Who Hates: The Courageous Woman Who Inflamed the Muslim World Speaks Out Against the Evils of Radical Islam
A God Who Hates: The Courageous Woman Who Inflamed the Muslim World Speaks Out Against the Evils of Radical Islam
by Wafa Sultan
Edition: Hardcover

28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Goes to the heart of sensitive problems, 24 April 2010
This short and easily read book provides a riveting account of core problems in the Islamic world, with particular focus on the situation for women. Wafa Sultan, born and raised in Syria, knows from the inside the psychological games played in Islamic societies and analyzes them without mercy, contrasting them to the genuine freedom we have in Western-style democracies. This is done in a style easily accessible to non-professionals, and provides many important clues to how we should handle Islamic influence in the West.

This book is well worth reading for anyone interested in the field, and should be required reading for anyone working professionally with Muslim immigrants or dealing with political matters related to Islamic organisations or countries.


The Great Deception: Can the European Union Survive?
The Great Deception: Can the European Union Survive?
by Christopher Booker
Edition: Paperback

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There's nothing like it, 21 Nov. 2009
A friend of mine causually recommended me this book. While I did take some offense from the title (deception is quite evil), after reading it I must admit that it is apt and accurate.

This book has not only provided me with a detailed knowledge about the origins of the EU, it has also reshaped my opinion of it profoundly. It is a shame (though a necessity) that the book is so dense - this is no lightweight overview. Non-UK readers like myself will find the Britain-centric chapters somewhat heavy to digest, but British readers should appreciate them deeply.

Even for the non-British, these chapters document the struggle between liberty and bureaucracy in chilling detail, reading almost like crime fiction, with the significant difference that we already know that the bureaucrats have been winning. The last parts deal with the Constitutional Treaty, now the Lisbon Treaty, and the uncertainty at the time of writing if this would pass or not. As we know now, it is coming into force, and the European super-state is an (unadmitted) reality.

This book is the best antidote to the ongoing deception. Highly recommended.


The Victory of Reason: How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success
The Victory of Reason: How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success
by Rodney Stark
Edition: Hardcover

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth reading, 22 Oct. 2007
I found this book most intriguing. While Stark may be a bit short on details and somewhat in a hurry, his pointing out the practical advances, in technology, society and philosophy, makes his basic thesis sound:

Capitalism, human rights, freedom & democracy are basically European inventions.

It is a milestone to realize that in these times of globalization and cultural conflicts, to say the least. We have every right and reason to stand firm on the (positive) pride of European values, and would deceive ourselves if we were to pretend they are not derived from Christianity.

Back to the book, I actually found it somewhat messy. While it has a basic chronological order, it also jumps a bit here and there, and sometimes fast-forwards through episodes that deserve more elaboration. Another 100 pages would have done it good.

That said, the pros easily outweigh the cons. The history of the city-states of Italy, Netherlands (he skips the Hansa a bit) and of England are the core of European history. Flanders, not a country of it own as of writing this review, certainly has its own honorable place in the history of Europe.

Stark makes a fine introduction to the treasures of European identity, and left me hungry for more. He breaks new ground and is unconditionally worth reading.


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