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FC Harris (Willenhall, West Midlands United Kingdom)

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History of the Middle Ages
History of the Middle Ages
Price: £0.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Post Roman Europe, 25 Oct. 2014
The book presents a basic introduction to aid understanding of Europe's medieval history, especially the well-documented periods. However the early Barbarian formation of the individual countries and states is based on scant historical evidence, and could benefit from an update to include the latest genetics, archaeological research etc. Indeed in this respect the settlement pattern seen as data plots along the Roman roads depicted in http://fchknols.wordpress.com, suggest trade may have been important in establishing the variety of languages of this region.


The Oxford History Of Medieval Europe
The Oxford History Of Medieval Europe
by George Holmes
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.68

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Western Europe's early history, 25 Oct. 2014
The book presents a useful introduction to aid understanding of the western part of Europe's complex medieval history, especially the later well-documented periods. However the early formation of the individual countries and states is based on scant historical evidence, and could benefit from an update to include the latest genetics, archaeological research etc. Indeed in this respect the settlement pattern seen as data plots along the Roman roads depicted in http://fchknols.wordpress.com, suggest trade may have been important in establishing the variety of languages of this region.


The Penguin History of Medieval Europe (Penguin History)
The Penguin History of Medieval Europe (Penguin History)
by Maurice Keen
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Europe's historical complexity exlained, 25 Oct. 2014
The book presents a useful introduction to aid understanding of Europe's complex medieval history, especially the later well-documented periods. However the early formation of the individual countries and states is based on scant historical evidence, and could benefit from an update to include the latest genetics, archaeological research etc. Indeed in this respect the settlement pattern seen as data plots along the Roman roads depicted in http://fchknols.wordpress.com, suggest trade may have been important in establishing the variety of languages of this region.


Britain After Rome: The Fall and Rise, 400 to 1070: Anglo-Saxon Britain Vol 2 (The Penguin History of Britain)
Britain After Rome: The Fall and Rise, 400 to 1070: Anglo-Saxon Britain Vol 2 (The Penguin History of Britain)
by Robin Fleming
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.68

4.0 out of 5 stars Assimilation of the Anglo Saxons, 10 Sept. 2014
The book presents an insightful account of the Anglo-Saxon period through to the Norman Conquest, based on both conventional historical sources and recent archaeology, to explain the transition of Roman Britain through social and cultural assimilation of new immigrants with the existing 'celtic' population via the spread of Christianity, to eventually produce the new land of England (the main focus of this text) from the formation and eventual amalgamation of the various early Kingdoms. However still being dependent on scant historical records, the scale of new settlement and complete 'anglicisation' of the countryside unfortunately remains inconclusive on this fundamental point. In this latter respect the indigenous Britons may have been a pre Roman Germanic-speaking people residing alongside the Welsh, faced with the 5th century AD incursions of Saxons, Angles and other groups of settlers. See http://fchknols.wordpress.com


The Origins of the Anglo-Saxons
The Origins of the Anglo-Saxons
by Donald Henson
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The early Anglo-Saxons reinterpreted, 10 Sept. 2014
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The book presents a useful introduction to the early Anglo-Saxon period of Britain. However, developments in genetics, archaeology, linguistics and significantly stable isotope analysis on burials, are gradually questioning this traditional account. Indeed the indigenous Britons may have been a pre Roman Germanic-speaking people residing alongside the Welsh, Gaels and Picts, faced with the 5th century AD incursions of Saxons, Angles and other groups of settlers described in the text. See for example http://fchknols.wordpress.com


The Story of England
The Story of England
by Michael Wood
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

4.0 out of 5 stars An engaging historical perception of England, 7 Sept. 2014
This review is from: The Story of England (Paperback)
The author has provided a well-illustrated, informative historical rendition including the traditional Anglo-Saxon story and subsequent social development of England up Victorian times, as seen through an engaging depiction of the progress of Kibworth, a Leicestershire village apparently with early origins starting well before the Roman occupation. Notably, perceived gradual and continuous cultural assimilation of immigrants with preexisting populations was imaginatively reconstructed, and seemingly broadly in line with burials analysis in that region undertaken with the latest technical methods. Although not considered in the given account, some of the presumed Celtic indigenous British population in Kibworth prior to the Anglo-Saxons may alternatively have had Germanic forebears. For example see http://fchknols.wordpress.com for more contextual data on this specific point.


Britain and the End of the Roman Empire
Britain and the End of the Roman Empire
by Ken Dark
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dark Age Britain reassessed, 6 Sept. 2014
The traditional narrative of the early 5/6th centuries has relied on scant historical records, and is inconclusive on the languages spoken across Britain or the scale of new settlement during this period.
In trying to address these ambiguities the author primarily used contemporary archaeological burial evidence, notably the gradual change to Christian burial rite, to argue for cultural assimilation rather than major ethnic replacement by pagan immigrants.
Indeed since publication developments in stable isotope analysis is seemingly beginning to confirm the author’s interpretation, revealing to date that for example only a minority of immigrants are apparently represented in the investigated burial grounds of contemporary England, the majority population apparently born locally or from other regions of Britain.
Thus a timely 2nd edition could include the latest archaeological, genetic, isotope analysis, place-names, coin finds etc. evidence to advantage, to further examine the possibility that the Britons mentioned in the AS Chronicle and elsewhere were a Germanic speaking indigenous people residing in this island alongside Welsh speakers and the Picts of Scotland that accommodated incoming Saxons, Angles and Gaels during and after the Roman departure. See for example http://fchknols.wordpress.com


The Anglo-Saxon World
The Anglo-Saxon World
by Nicholas Higham
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £30.00

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Anglo-Saxon story updated, 22 Aug. 2014
This review is from: The Anglo-Saxon World (Hardcover)
The authors provide a well illustrated and updated general account of the full Anglo-Saxon period, which will likely be of genuine interest and sound educational value to both the lay and student reader. For more advanced study, detailed sources are given in references and comprehensive bibliography at the end of the book.
In particular the latest archaeological, genetic, isotope analysis on burials, place-names, coin finds etc. evidence was examined and used to persuasively demonstrate the emergence of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms after the departure of the Romans, including contrasting developments in our near continental neighbours.
However like previous texts, the discussion dealing with the early 5/6th centuries still fundamentally relies on scant historical records and therefore seemingly remains inconclusive on the languages spoken across Britain and the scale of Germanic/Scandinavian settlement.
Indeed the possibility that the indigenous Britons (and the British language) faced with Saxons, Angles and other groups of raiders/settlers along the North Sea coasts as reported in the historical sources, were a pre-Roman resident Germanic-speaking people along with the Welsh, Gaels and Picts, could have been more thoroughly explored in the text. See for example http://fchknols.wordpress.com


The Domesday Quest: In search of the Roots of England
The Domesday Quest: In search of the Roots of England
by Michael Wood
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Anglo-Saxon story, 17 July 2013
The book presents a useful introduction to the Anglo-Saxon period of Britain. However, developments in genetics, archaeology, linguistics and significantly stable isotope analysis on burials, are gradually questioning the traditional account of the early phase. Indeed the reported indigenous Britons may have been a pre Roman Germanic-speaking people residing alongside the Welsh, Gaels and Picts, faced with the 5th century AD incursions of Saxons, Angles and other groups of settlers described in the text. See for example http://fchknols.wordpress.com


The Anglo-Saxons
The Anglo-Saxons
by James Campbell
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.88

4.0 out of 5 stars The traditional Anglo-Saxon story, 17 July 2013
This review is from: The Anglo-Saxons (Paperback)
The book presents a useful introduction to the Anglo-Saxon period of Britain. However, developments in genetics, archaeology, linguistics and significantly stable isotope analysis on burials, are gradually questioning the traditional early account, in particular. Indeed the reported indigenous Britons may have been a pre Roman Germanic-speaking people residing alongside the Welsh, Gaels and Picts, faced with the 5th century AD incursions of Saxons, Angles and other groups of settlers described in the text. See for example http://fchknols.wordpress.com
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 14, 2014 5:07 PM GMT


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