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Bad Santas: and Other Creepy Christmas Characters
Bad Santas: and Other Creepy Christmas Characters
by Paul Hawkins
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £6.81

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect Xmas present!, 5 Nov 2013
What a great book! Highly recommended as a Christmas gift or secret santa or something like that.

I put it in the s***ter and was so captivated on my first read that by the time I stood up (after wiping my anus clean) my legs had gone numb and I fell down on my face. Really hurt too.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 12, 2013 8:39 PM GMT


Relate
Relate
Price: £8.15

5.0 out of 5 stars This is the sex, 18 Sep 2013
This review is from: Relate (Audio CD)
When I think of the sex, I think of this album. The reason for that is because this album is the sex.


I'm An Office Worker
I'm An Office Worker
by Michael Häne
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.02

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bit needy, 27 Jun 2013
This review is from: I'm An Office Worker (Paperback)
I was rifling through a table full of used books at my local car boot sale in Dalston when I came across this colourful number in the pile. "Hmmm interesting" I exclaimed aloud. I'd recently accepted a position working in an office, due to start the following Monday so thought that this would be the perfect way to learn what to expect and how I should behave in this brave new world.

Unfortunately, it seems that the life of an office worker is incredibly depressing, and involves having no control of your bladder while you sleep. I couldn't believe some of the things I read here, self obsessed & purile doesn't even begin to describe it. By the time I'd reached the last page, I just wanted to find all of these people and tell them to take a long hard look at themselves in the mirror. I wanted to save them from the mundane lives which they live and choose to do nothing about.

I ended up not taking the job, I couldn't bare to live the existence which these torrid pages described. I now work as a fixie repair man and haven't looked back since.

Pablo Honey > OK Computer = Hail To The Thief


No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars Cheap, easy to use, works with multiple battery types, 17 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was worried from the reviews about working out how to use this, but it's a doddle. Just connect the two prongs to the two battery connection points using the the clip to hold it in place. Is more versatile and cheaper than the alternatives, can't recommend it enough. Been using it for about a year now and still no problems.


Sennheiser OMX80SPORT ECO Stereo Clip-on Earphones For a Secure Fit During Sports
Sennheiser OMX80SPORT ECO Stereo Clip-on Earphones For a Secure Fit During Sports

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poorly made, terribly designed, 27 Jan 2010
They're meant to be sports earphones, yet their terrible design means they barely fit in your ear, and when running they slide out of position needing constant readjustment. The cable is supposed to be tougher to deal with wear and tear, but looks exactly the same thickness and design as any other similar one.

These are just terrible, not worth any money at all. Avoid!


INQ1 3 Mobile Pay As You Go Mobile Phone Including £10 Airtime - Silver
INQ1 3 Mobile Pay As You Go Mobile Phone Including £10 Airtime - Silver
Offered by West-Kom
Price: £49.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars All issues with this phone I could live with, except one, 27 Jan 2010
If it weren't for on of the problems I have with this phone, I'd recommend it. It's cheap, offers a lot of functionality for its low price, it's small, can take a 16GB micro SD card etc.

One problem with it is the battery life. With MSN, Skype & Facebook connected, with no calls, the battery lasted about a day and a half, and that's from new. I'm sure it'd last longer if you didn't use these, but surely that's part of the point.

Another problem is the one interface port. There's no 3.5mm jack to plug your headphones into. You'll need to buy a separate unsupported converter to plug into the micro USB (but make sure you don't buy one with the groove, the manufacturer refuses to offer advice on what exactly you need to purchase for this. With the one port though, it does mean you can never charge it at the same time as listening, so if you plan on listening for a long time, you'd better be well prepared with the battery life.

Another problem is the lack of calendar functionality or syncing it to anything else. Apparently the calendar can only store 20 entries and there's no upgrade on the horizon to make it any more usable. Essentially it's entirely token.

The biggest problem though, the one which means I'd never buy this phone (note PHONE) is how terrible it is at picking up a signal or making a call. I previously had the Nokia N95 which was pretty abysmal at this too (tested side by side with other mobiles in the same area also on 3 network), but nothing compares to the INQ1. It's awful. I live in central London and it barely registers a signal anywhere often only holding it for 30 seconds or so at a time, rendering it pretty much unusable. Sure dazzle and distract with many features, but never forget the core functionality! It's a phone, it's for making phone calls! From what I've read elsewhere online also, this isn't just a localised fault to my handset, this is just a fundamental design flaw.

I'm using my N95 again now.


Interiors
Interiors

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well decorated, 9 Jan 2004
This review is from: Interiors (Audio CD)
For years, Pearl Jam have tried to recapture the magic they had from their first two albums. While still a great band, who's musical evolution means they've passed the test of time, Binaural and Riot Act can't even be placed alongside Ten and Versus. Not many musicians can produce consistently good music all of their lives. For every Beck, there are many Neil Young's. So with this album being released in 1997, not long after the release of No Code, the expectations can't have been too high for Stone Gossard's side project. Perhaps it was just good timing, but Brad's debut album (not counting the collection of demos known as Shame) was a masterpiece.
Despite all the hype surrounding the band revolving around Stone, it didn't take long to work out that the mastermind behind this project was Satchel's Shawn Smith. The Prince-influenced singer/pianist demands attention with his soft, mesmorising vocal lines. Brad bear more resemblance to Satchel than Pearl Jam but Stone Gossard's subtle guitar work does add a lot to the mix. Always playing second fiddle to Mike McCready in Pearl Jam gives Stone the perfect experience of adding the parts to songs which you hardly notice when they are there, but would definitely notice if they weren't.
The album was never meant to change the world, but the quality of songwriting here is enough to win over most. Ranging from the lullaby serenity of 'Some Never Come Home' to the dirty grunge of 'Sweet Al George', the album caters for a lot of tastes.
Highlights of the album include the Pachelbel 'Canon In D' reminiscent 'The Day Brings', the haunting 'I Don't Know', the gentle 'Circle & Line' and the gorgeous 'Some Never Come Home'. Songs that captivate you from the very first listen.
There is one flaw on this album that seems to have put a lot of people off the band from the first listen. The problem is 'Secret Girl', the opening track. It's a no-brainer rock song that plods along with few redeaming features, and makes for good usage of the 'next' button on any stereo system. First impressions count and I know a lot of people who have never been able to see past the very average opening track. Despite 'Secret Girl' though, this album is a classic piece of work with every other track almost apologising for the opening number.
It's nothing too original, but the strength of the individual songs make that unimportant.


Live Around Special 96 Only Good Summer
Live Around Special 96 Only Good Summer
Offered by samurai_media_JPN4UK
Price: £10.20

5.0 out of 5 stars Well decorated, 9 Jan 2004
For years, Pearl Jam have tried to recapture the magic they had from their first two albums. While still a great band, who's musical evolution means they've passed the test of time, Binaural and Riot Act can't even be placed alongside Ten and Versus. Not many musicians can produce consistently good music all of their lives. For every Beck, there are many Neil Young's. So with this album being released in 1997, not long after the release of No Code, the expectations can't have been too high for Stone Gossard's side project. Perhaps it was just good timing, but Brad's debut album (not counting the collection of demos known as Shame) was a masterpiece.
Despite all the hype surrounding the band revolving around Stone, it didn't take long to work out that the mastermind behind this project was Satchel's Shawn Smith. The Prince-influenced singer/pianist demands attention with his soft, mesmorising vocal lines. Brad bear more resemblance to Satchel than Pearl Jam but Stone Gossard's subtle guitar work does add a lot to the mix. Always playing second fiddle to Mike McCready in Pearl Jam gives Stone the perfect experience of adding the parts to songs which you hardly notice when they are there, but would definitely notice if they weren't.
The album was never meant to change the world, but the quality of songwriting here is enough to win over most. Ranging from the lullaby serenity of 'Some Never Come Home' to the dirty grunge of 'Sweet Al George', the album caters for a lot of tastes.
Highlights of the album include the Pachelbel 'Canon In D' reminiscent 'The Day Brings', the haunting 'I Don't Know', the gentle 'Circle & Line' and the gorgeous 'Some Never Come Home'. Songs that captivate you from the very first listen.
There is one flaw on this album that seems to have put a lot of people off the band from the first listen. The problem is 'Secret Girl', the opening track. It's a no-brainer rock song that plods along with few redeaming features, and makes for good usage of the 'next' button on any stereo system. First impressions count and I know a lot of people who have never been able to see past the very average opening track. Despite 'Secret Girl' though, this album is a classic piece of work with every other track almost apologising for the opening number.
It's nothing too original, but the strength of the individual songs make that unimportant.


Welcome To Discovery Park
Welcome To Discovery Park
Offered by Get it in a Jiffy
Price: £16.57

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Revisit Discovery Park, 2 Oct 2003
As I sit on the train, with my headphones on at a volume loud enough to annoy the rest of my carriage, but not loud enough to cause them to actually complain to me, I wonder what opinion of my musical taste they are judging from the music dulcet sounds coming from my ears. It's when you hear songs like 'Shinin'', which is screaming out for a boyband cover (meant in the nicest possible way!) alongside the funk of 'Drop It Down' and the rock of 'Revolution', that you thank God for side projects!
Side projects generally fall into two categories - Over-ambitious.., and ambitious works of genius. Personally I believe Brad to fall into the latter category.
Forget the fact that Pearl Jam's Stone Gossard is on guitar, because the star of the show here, is undoubtedly Shawn Smith. A highly and underrated artist, he provides the sound which make Brad so refreshing and brilliant.
On songs like 'If You Could Make It Good' and my personal favourite, 'Never Let Each Other Down', the delicate sound of a soft piano alongside Shawn's high pitched beautiful voice is a winning combination. Also, they do their funk / soul combo pretty damn well, not so present on this album compared to previous ones, with only 'Drop It Down' showing some seriously funky moments.
There's only one thing that pisses me off about Brad, and they seem to be the songs where Stone Gossard is in charge. As much as I LOVE Pearl Jam, songs like 'Revolution' and the single 'La, La, La' ruin this album in my opinion. It could have been a classic, but I cannot understand how 'Revolution' made the final cut. Only in a side-project, I guess. It's comical to hear Stone Gossard struggling on drums, from the first listen to this song, I instantly despised it.
This album doesn't have quite the effect on me that 'Interiors' did, but still a great album and a well recommended purchase, whether you like Pearl Jam or not!


Riot Act
Riot Act
Offered by beaches_music_canada
Price: £4.43

4.0 out of 5 stars Contented Band, 2 Oct 2003
This review is from: Riot Act (Audio CD)
Thank God it isn't 'Binaural Part II'! After the disillusion I received from 'Binaural', Pearl Jam have got their act together and produced the gorgeously confident 'Riot Act'. It's hard to believe that this album is the seventh studio offering from one of the last survivors of the original grunge era. The introduction of Matt Cameron (Soundgarden, Temple Of The Dog) on drums has really made a difference, especially given the level of writing input he's had on the album. Considering he seems to have written as many songs on this album as McCready and Gossard combined, you have to wonder what those two were up to while Vedder and Cameron were penning each wonderful tune (although Gossard did pen my two favourites of the album - the uplifting 'Love Boat Captain' and the beautiful 'All Or None').
One of the major factors which has caused a lot of people to take an instant dislike to Pearl Jam before even hearing them has been the forever controversial Eddie Vedder. A voice / enemy / nobody (delete as applicable) of a generation, he's never kept quiet about his opinions. On this album however, Eddie takes a more reflective approach to his lyric writing. Where as songs like 'Love Boat Captain' and 'I Am Mine' show Eddie at peace with the world, ("I know it's already been sung, can't be said enough, love is all you need, all you need is love") songs like 'Bu$hleauger' and 'Green Disease' show the more familiar critical bluntness far more obvious than any lyrics from previous albums("He's not a leader he's a Texas leaguer", "Drilling for fear makes the job simple"), or maybe that's just me getting older and not taking as long to "get it".
The addition of Kenneth "Boom" Gaspar on the Hammond B3 seems to sit well in this new, more relaxed Pearl Jam that have cast away the rebellious stances of the 'Ten' and 'Versus' era, and admitted "I've stopped trying to make a difference" ('No Way' - 'Yield'), and seem to have that chemistry between each other that seemed to be lacking on albums like 'No Code' and 'Binaural'. To some, Pearl Jam are more than just a band, their appeal spans much further than their music. They've gone from flavour of the month, to 'sell-outs', to a cult act, to hall-of-fame veterans in less than a decade. The colourful history of the band has always been evident in their music, and it's easy to get sucked in to it all. Whether producing questionable songs like 'Bugs' and 'Habit' or writing masterpieces like 'Black' and 'Daughter', the fact that they're still out there, trying new things and not worrying about the fanbase's opinion means that I'll always be there every couple of years, waiting for the new album, with pretty good odds that that the one genre they'll never decide to toy with contains any combinations of the words 'metal' and 'nu'.


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