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Dave K "Dave K" (York, UK)

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God So Loved, He Gave
God So Loved, He Gave
by KAPIC/BORGER
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 11.01

5.0 out of 5 stars A seriously beautiful and rich story of a generous God inviting us to join him, 22 Mar 2011
This review is from: God So Loved, He Gave (Hardcover)
We might expect a book about giving to be a guilt-trip and focused on our wallet. This book is neither of these.

It begins "Let me tell you a story...the story about God."

That tells you a lot about this book. It is not a long book, although its 200 pages are closely typed and it is tightly written. Nevertheless, it a big book in other ways. The book sweeps from creation, through the fall to redemption with God himself as the centre of the story. As the main actor in this drama God is thoughtfully and beautifully shown to be God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. And the story's major theme is God giving himself in the Son and the Spirit to a people who never deserved such grace.

With this as the big picture the application becomes refreshingly different to many exhortations to generosity you may have heard.

> It is saturated in grace - we are reminded to give because we have first received.
> It is God-centred - you are inspired to grow in generosity, but wonder and thankfulness for the Triune God is the dominant melody.
> It is inviting rather than pushy - as the subtitle suggests, we are invited into God's story and into the relationship between the three persons of the Trinity.

But this God of grace takes you to quite dizzying heights, and things look a bit different from his perspective. Just as God invites you in to join him, he invites you to join him going out in self-giving. Kapic and Berger show that it is the grace of the Triune God which will make generosity so much more radical than it would be otherwise. E.g.

> God didn't just give things, but his person - so how can we respond by just giving a percentage rather than our whole selves?
> We are rich because we have received so much - so how can we not give lavishly?

Personally the most memorable theme was that of belonging. We belong to God because he created us. This was perfect freedom but we rejected belonging to God and chose bondage to sin. God reclaimed us by giving (!) so we can experience the gift of being his slaves.

This book is so rich that I could spend a long time trying to describe its content but I would struggle to do it justice.

If you are wondering about the form: It is theological but I was pleasantly surprised how expositional it was. It would probably be enjoyed by any regular reader of Christian books but may be too demanding for an occasional reader. Finally, it is Reformed Evangelical in its theology but (in-keeping with the theme) Kapic is generous in drawing on a wide range of thinkers.

'God So Loved He Gave' was simultaneously one of the most emotionally moving and intellectually engaging theology books I have read in several years. It engaged me on every level (mind, heart and will) and there are not very many books you can say that about. I highly recommend this beautiful book.


Selected Writings of Martin Luther
Selected Writings of Martin Luther
by Theodore G. Tappert
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great value box set, 29 Feb 2008
Table of Contents:

Preface to the Wittenberg Edition of Luther's German Writings, 1539
Preface to the Complete Edition of Luther's Latin Writings, 1945
Disputation Against Scholastic Theology, 1517
Ninety-five Theses, 1517
Heildelberg Disputation, 1518
Treatise on Good Works, 1520
The Papacy in Rome, an Answer to the Celebrated Romanist in Leipzig, 1520
To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation Concerning the Reform of the Christian Estate, 1520
The Babylonian Captivity of the Church, 1520
The Freedom of a Christian, 1520
Why the Books of the Pope and His Disciples Were Burned, 1520
Against Latomus, 1521
Avoiding the Doctrines of Men, 1522
Eight Sermons at Wittenberg, 1522
Temporal Authority: To What Extent It Should be Obeyed, 1523
The Right and Power of a Christian Church, 1523
Ordinance of a Common Chest, 1523
Concerning the Order of Public Worship, 1523
An Order of Mass and Communion for the Church at Wittenberg, 1523
An Exhortation to the Knights of the Teutonic Order, 1523
To the Councilmen of All Cities in Germany That They Establish and Maintain Christian Schools, 1524
Trade and Usury, 1524
Against the Heavenly Prophets in the Matter of Images and Sacraments, 1525
Admonition to Peace, a Reply to the Twelve Articles of the Peasants in Swabia, 1525
Against the Robbing and Murdering Hordes of Peasants, 1525
An Open Letter on the Harsh Book Against the Peasants, 1525
The German Mass and Order of Service, 1526
Whether Soldiers, Too, Can be Saved, 1526
On War Against the Turks 1529
Exhortation to All Clergy Assembled at Augsburg, 1530
A Sermon on Keeping Children in School, 1530
On Translating: An Open Letter, 1530
On the Councils and the Church, 1539
Prefaces to the Bible, 1545-1546

A very nice box set of 4 paperback volumes. It does not contain all of Luther's most important works (in particular The Bondage of the Will, The Small and Large Catechisms and The Commentary on Galatians) but is absolutely brilliant value of some of the most important works in the history of Christianity.


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