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R. P. Sedgwick "Grim Rob" (UK)
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Bobby Fischer Goes to War
Bobby Fischer Goes to War
by David Edmonds
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.11

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fun to Look Back!, 26 Oct 2004
This book covers the infamous Fischer v Spassky match played at the height of the Cold War. Told from a perspective of thirty years, it's clear that the behaviour of Fischer could only be acceptable within the context of the Cold War. His demands and general behaviour were so intolerable that under any other circumstances the match would probably not have taken place. Yet at the time it was a deadly serious encounter at the Soviet nation's favourite pastime!
You don't need to know anything about chess to read this book, it's more about the events surrounding the match than the individual games within it.


Eats shoots and leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation
Eats shoots and leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation
by Lynne Truss
Edition: Hardcover

23 of 50 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Rather Pointless!, 28 Sep 2004
This is a light-hearted look at the subject of punctuation which is neither particularly funny (although it tries to be), nor is it particularly comprehensive on its subject matter (which again it doesn't really aspire to).
The result is a rather rambling and unsatisfactory look at most of our punctuation characters. The book aims to go nowhere in particular - and, in that, it meets its aim.


The Lost King of France: The Tragic Story of Marie-Antoinette's Favourite Son
The Lost King of France: The Tragic Story of Marie-Antoinette's Favourite Son
by Deborah Cadbury
Edition: Paperback

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reads like a thriller, 28 Sep 2004
A superb piece of writing, brilliantly written and thoroughly researched. The central enquiry of the book is what happened to the child Louis XVII after he was imprisoned in the Temple following the French Revolution. Through the use of modern genetics, at the end of the book a conclusion is reached, which puts to an end two centuries of speculation about the royal line.
The book as a whole reads like a thriller, and like all the author's other books, is well worth reading.


Schubert: Winterreise (DG The Originals)
Schubert: Winterreise (DG The Originals)
Offered by skyvo-direct
Price: 8.09

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Recording, 16 Sep 2004
This is a fantastic recording of a brilliant piece of music. The recording is crisp and clear and worth buying for the first track alone! Fischer-Dieskau made several recordings of this great song cycle, but this one by Deutsche Grammophon is the pick.


Football Factory (Special Edition) [2004] [DVD]
Football Factory (Special Edition) [2004] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Danny Dyer
Offered by DVDBayFBA
Price: 2.95

6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Absolute Rubbish, 16 Sep 2004
I'm quite a fan of John King, and have read most of his books, so got a hold of a copy of The Football Factory soon after it came out. I was extremely disappointed with the film, which does no justice at all to an excellent book.


Learning To Swim
Learning To Swim
by Clare Chambers
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.99

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enchanting, 11 Sep 2004
This review is from: Learning To Swim (Paperback)
I loved every second of reading this book and I suspect it will live with me for a long while. All of the characters were brilliant, and the plot absolutely perfect and totally believable. In places the book was very funny, in others very moving, and even though I am a man I could relate enormously to the mainly teenage years (from a female perspective) of the narrative.
The good news is Learning to Swim is also the first Clare Chambers book I have read, so I will soon be making a start on some of her others.


Richard Feynman A Life in Science (Penguin Press Science S.)
Richard Feynman A Life in Science (Penguin Press Science S.)
by John R. Gribbin
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Life in Science, 11 Sep 2004
This book covers Feynman's life, as well as his many achievements in physics, in a readable manner. What really comes over is Feynman's love of science, his deep understanding of the underlying concepts, and his desire to communicate that knowledge to others - without any personal gain in terms of fame or material goods.
This book also goes some way to exploring the subject of Feynman the man, as well as the scientist, covering areas like the death of his first wife, his many relationships, his childhood and his family.


The Calendar: The 5000 Year Struggle To Align The Clock and the Heavens, and What Happened To The Missing Ten Days
The Calendar: The 5000 Year Struggle To Align The Clock and the Heavens, and What Happened To The Missing Ten Days
by David Ewing Duncan
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 22 Aug 2004
The Calendar is a masterful account of something we are all familiar with on a daily basis, and mostly just take for granted. The story of how the calendar took shape, from mankind's starting position of knowing nothing about the environment he lived in, up to modern times is fascinating, and spans many great civilisations and religions.


Brick Lane
Brick Lane
by Monica Ali
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 11.04

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 3 Aug 2004
This review is from: Brick Lane (Hardcover)
I was disappointed with this book. Brick Lane had the potential to be a good story, but it is overlong. There are far too many scenes and characters in the book than the plot justifies. In particular the letters from Hasina are almost unreadable and add very little to the book after the first few. It's a pity a lot of the chaff wasn't stripped out before Brick Lane was published, and it might have been a much better read.


Sybil: The True Story of a Woman Possessed by Sixteen Separate Personalities
Sybil: The True Story of a Woman Possessed by Sixteen Separate Personalities
by Flora Schreiber
Edition: Paperback

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, 29 July 2004
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
That this book is a true story is something I had to constantly remind myself as I was reading it, because in many ways it feels like a novel. The Sybil described in this book is so alien that I found it almost impossible to relate to her as a human being.
That's to take nothing away from the book. Sybil's story alone is good enough to make this book a classic, but it is well and sympathetically written after years of painstaking research by the author.
The suspense of finding out what happened in Sybil's childhood to cause the disassociation into different personalities is superbly done, and makes reading the book a thoroughly gripping experience.


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