Profile for M. C. Morison > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by M. C. Morison
Top Reviewer Ranking: 216,028
Helpful Votes: 37

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
M. C. Morison (Athens)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
A Place in the Choir
A Place in the Choir
Price: £4.28

5.0 out of 5 stars A book of gentle lyricism and great humanity, 4 Dec. 2014
In Ms. Quirk-Smith's engrossing story, we follow Ellie as she struggles with the decision of whether to remain a nun. We meet her remarkable family. They are remarkable because in this tale they come vividly to life, in moments of pathos and many moments of great humour. This is a book with a warm heart, written with a wonderful eye for those events, usually small in themselves, that shape a life.
Quirke-Smith's characters, and her words, remain in your mind long after the book has been set aside. The setting for Ellie's struggle is in a world that has all but vanished, but is picked out in memorable scenes, with dialogue that is all too believable delivered by people all too real. I cannot recommend this book highly enough. It deserves to be read by all who relish outstanding writing.


Dryadia: A Land in Waiting
Dryadia: A Land in Waiting
by Robin Hayfield
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.74

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing and thought provoking fantasy, 4 Dec. 2014
“Near Wales, in the West, not as far as Ireland?” People tend to forget where Dryadia is, this country so close to Great Britain and yet so different. In Hayfield’s novel three young people from the East (England and Wales) visit the Dryadian consulate and after far reaching interviews with the Consul Anaxamander, win the chance to study at the University of Cantillion. We follow their exploits as they (and we) learn about this country with its hexagonal buildings, ecological philosophy and gentle people who can call down lightening in ceremonials. But Sam, Mary and Pushkin are not the only ones who cross the Drangle estuary in The Leaky Bucket to enter the deep forests that protect Dryadia. A spy, half Dryadian, has come as well.
Our enthusiastic visitors are shocked when Anaxamander is kidnapped within his own borders and whisked away by powers far greater than any Dryadia can muster. The Elders, wise and some with intuitive vision, recognise their country is under threat. But life must go on and the three visitors continue to learn the mysteries of this tiny realm, with its Oracles etched into Pillars of Wisdom.
Dryadia skilfully presents a vision of an intriguing and idealistic society through the medium of a thoroughly engrossing adventure story.


Shaman Pathways - Elen of the Ways: British Shamanism - Following the Deer Trods
Shaman Pathways - Elen of the Ways: British Shamanism - Following the Deer Trods
by Elen Sentier
Edition: Paperback
Price: £4.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The old ways presented in a new light, 15 Oct. 2014
Exactly who were the people whose carvings of stunning beauty were crafted with such remarkable skill13,000 years ago? Elen Sentier opens her delightful exploration of shamanism, with an artefact depicting swimming reindeer, indicating a maker with the cultural understanding, time and motivation to produce a work that can only have an artistic and possibly sacred meaning. The beauty and intricacy of the carved mammoth tusk suggests a sophistication not usually associated with those scraping a living during the last ice-age. With this fragile work we start, with Elen, to walk the Ways of Elen, the silvery threads of a history not quite forgotten but generally overlooked.
Like the reindeer who walked the Boreal (northern) Forest that encircled the globe from western America to Eastern Russia, we take a journey sometimes personal and sometimes mythical following the ‘deer trod’. Elen writes with great fluency and often movingly about the hunter gatherers who – far from struggling to survive – often had more time than those whose more settled agricultural existence would later keep them working from dawn to dusk, often near poverty. She gradually evokes a world, within, behind and before our current era, a world marked by dolmens, old roads and sacred landmarks, where Elen - the Goddess Energy - leaves her traces. Like the Sami, we follow the wisdom of the grandmother deer who guided the reindeer herds, never controlled by those tribes who followed them, teaching which deer to take in the hunt and expecting gratitude in return.
This is a book to savour. We often walk with the author, and in places like the far north of Britain perceive her world and enjoy her discoveries as though we were there. It is a gift to teach to see the world with fresh eyes, a world hidden and ever present. Elen Sentier has that gift and that is why this is such a significant book.


The 49th Day
The 49th Day
by Helen Noble
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A delightful romance and intriguing tale, 8 Aug. 2014
This review is from: The 49th Day (Paperback)
The 49th Day is a romance. In the best sense of the word. It has many elements woven together with ease: a mysterious cliff-top suicide; dreams that are all too real; historical connections between Wales and Ireland of which few are now aware; past lives gently and not so gently flowing into the present.
Katherine, the heroine, finds she is connected in some deep way with Angharad Fitz-Gerald of the early 12th century, the age of chivalry as well as a time of great physical violence. Doorways to the world just beyond open for Katherine, when she takes a retreat on an island just off the coast of Wales. Here she meets Fin, an Irishman who hopes to convert his rural family home into an eco-holiday site who – as with the Irish tales that so delight him – has a struggle ahead with his own brother.
Helen Noble has crafted a tale that literally had me gasp with surprise at one point. The story gradually reeled me in and I read the last third in a rush just to see how everything would be brought to resolution. Even as I write this review I find myself pondering on some of the characters who gently add either mystery or menace. And Ms. Noble is to be congratulated on having the courage to write some scenes where chivalry and sensuality intertwine delightfully. An historically intriguing tale artfully told.


Plotinus and the Path to Liberation
Plotinus and the Path to Liberation
by Shrine Of Wisdom Editors
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £15.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fresh translation and valuable commentary, 21 Jun. 2014
Plotinus is a giant amongst those philosophers whose ideas have left an indelible mark on human thought. Even something apparently as far removed as Greek and Russian iconography from the teachings of this pagan mystic, owes a great debt to his thoughts. His concepts about The One, The Soul, Nature and Matter inform the way the inspired painters of past and present reveal mystical truths within the discipline of icon painting. Both Christian thought in the medieval period and Islamic doctrine, can be shown to have been deeply influenced by ideas first espoused by this Egyptian from the 3rd Century CE.
The Shrine of Wisdom has published an invaluable introduction to Plotinian thought. The Editors have drawn on French sources as well as the original Greek to provide a fresh translation - excellent in my view - of many passages.
Considered one of the three greatest philosophers of antiquity, Plotinus did not write his teachings in a comprehensive and orderly way; that became the task of his disciple Porphyry, who arranged his ideas in the famous Enneads. Even though these writings are profoundly beautiful, not many have the time or inclination to give them deep study. The value of Plotinus and The Path to Liberation lies in the quality of the commentary offered by the Editors. This demonstrates an exceptional grasp of his thought and also provides guidance for the modern student.
This volume should be on the bookshelf of every serious student of mysticism who wishes to understand both the how and the why of the path to the liberation of the Soul. At a little over 150 pages long, the book can be read quite quickly. But it will remain a reference work for those who wish to understand the universal ideas behind the great religious doctrines of our time.


War God: Nights of the Witch
War God: Nights of the Witch
by Graham Hancock
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clash of the War Gods, 14 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Fasten your seat-belts for a roller-coaster ride when you embark on War God. You meet, in short order, young Pepillo by Santiago harbour, carrying the unspeakable belongings of his master, the dark hearted inquisitor. At the same time, a few hundred miles away from Cuba, the orphaned witch Tozi is struggling to stay alive in the fattening pens, in sight of the blood soaked pyramids of the Aztecs. Dominating a pyramid is the Aztec king Moctezuma, on a huge killing spree, while his armies gather to attack neighbouring tribes to capture more victims for slaughter. Spying from a hillside above one of these armies, the courageous warrior Shikotenka, has a desperate stratagem to save his people from the altars of blood.

Graham Hancock's first novel, charting the clash of two warrior empires, is both gripping and convincing. War God is described as historical within the fantasy genre. Hancock uses forays into the paranormal to powerful effect and in a way that is entirely believable. The Spaniards, with their absolute certainty of their moral right, live in a world where saints can, and do, intervene in human affairs. Moctezuma, uses hallucinogens and the psychic power of mass slaughter, to alter his consciousness to commune with the fickle god, Hummingbird. He knows he lives in a year when the fates decree his empire is at risk and he is determined to prevent this. Young Tozi can, at great physical cost to herself, become briefly invisible to others not skilled in her magic. This is how she has, so far at least, avoided losing her heart to a slash of an obsidian knife.
Both militant Christianity and the barbarous rites of the Mexica people, involved mass slaughter of innocents. Yet within each of these traditions were individuals of true nobility who influenced the course of history. Hancock provides an attractive portrayal of the wily and courageous Cortes. The war exploits of Shikotenka presents some of the finest action writing since O'Brian's Aubrey and Maturin series.

We must hope this novel is the first of a his own series.


The Jewel Keepers: Albion Bk. 1
The Jewel Keepers: Albion Bk. 1
by E.J. Bousfield
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.91

5.0 out of 5 stars Fantasy with a purpose, 23 Sept. 2010
This is a thoroughly good read and works well for adults as it will for teenagers. It is apparently true that we know little for certain about the English Celtic tribes (in comparison to the Welsh and Scottish) because the only names we now have for those tribes are the ones accorded by the Romans, who had the perspective of conquerors. Bousfield conjures up this world just before the arrival in force of the Roman Legions, when some of the southern tribes, ignoring what had actually happened in Gaul, considered co-operating with the Romans might be a good idea. However the story starts in England in more recent times, and soon we are introduced to Katie. She is a girl with a gift, because she can understand animals and they can understand her. Or at least she thinks she can. Part of her wonders if she might actually be developing a mental illness, like others in her family.

Katie's relationship with her mother, whom she never calls "Mummy" but rather uses her first name "Laura", is one that is not close. Rather she feels closer to her grandmother, who just happens to be committed to an asylum.

In contrast Mortunda is close to her father, the leader of the successful and warlike Brigante tribe; he hopes she will become leader after him. Mortunda though, is drawn to the life with the mysterious priestly group who have their headquarters in Mona. She knows she has special powers and may be able to travel between the Worlds.
This is an excellent book and one, once started, that holds you in its power. We can only hope part two will be with us soon because things are afoot in Albion past and present.


Lacie 500Gb USB Little Disk Black 301841
Lacie 500Gb USB Little Disk Black 301841

5.0 out of 5 stars Works for me, 17 Mar. 2010
I bought this lovely piece of equipment on recommendation from several people. It is neat and has (so far) worked faultlessly for me. The design is very well thought through and the little USB lead connects (and takes power from) my laptops. They have always found the hard drive and it appears clearly when I click Computer, in Start (Windows Vista). I note the other review (so far) and see there is a risk I could lose a lot of data, so I will back it up. However, so far I am very satisfied.LACIE Little Disk, Design by Sam Hecht - 500 GB USB 2.0 Portable External Hard Drive (301841) Portable external hard drive Storage


Seagate FreeAgent Desktop 500GB External Hard Drive EU & UK 3,5" 7200RPM 8MB USB2.0
Seagate FreeAgent Desktop 500GB External Hard Drive EU & UK 3,5" 7200RPM 8MB USB2.0

5.0 out of 5 stars Works really well, 17 July 2009
I have used this product successfully for several months now. It has efficiently backed up all my key files on my main computer - and I can access these on other computers if necessary, which can be very useful. I also use it to store a variety of media files (music, film, ebooks) - which it does very efficiently.
I have found the back-up programme included better than any software that I have bought for that purpose in the past. It backs up daily - and does so in the background without affecting my computer's speed. I have been very happy with seagate and have enjoyed its simple styling as it site on the windowsill of my office.


Shaman: Number 2 in series (Cole)
Shaman: Number 2 in series (Cole)
by Noah Gordon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Medicine men, 24 Feb. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Noah Gordon does meticulous research for his books and this one is no exception. Yet the intertwined stories of father and son, both doctors with a particular gift, never drags and the historical accuracy enhances a page turning narrative. Physician, another excellent book, gave us insights into Islamic medicine when the Christian west had little medical knowledge of value. In Shaman we learn a bit of North American Indian medicine and also the pioneering work in simple things like cleanliness when doing operations or delivering a child. The plot is well crafted and unfolds its secrets right up until the end. The Indian wars and more particularly the Civil War provide the backdrop. Read and enjoy!


Page: 1 | 2