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Roxy Night 3CD
Roxy Night 3CD
Price: £12.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rave On, it's a crazy feeling, 15 Jun. 2015
This review is from: Roxy Night 3CD (Audio CD)
It must be 35 years since I got a tape of a tape of a tape of a tape of a tape of someone 's home recording of this FM Broadcast. It was exciting even through the murk of multi generation degradation. But listening to this, wow, the room is shaking. Bruce in his 178 pomp and majesty. Wonderful stuff with the added bonus of the Dave Helman 1978 interview added on. Opening with a two and a half minute Rave On (TBruce and E Street Band debut) you're just carried away with the power and glory of Bruce and the boys at their best. Nicely packaged with some great photos, the one on the back of the box makes me laugh. We were all so much younger then, we're older than that now.


The Sweet Especial Scene
The Sweet Especial Scene
by Robin Lloyd-Jones
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "After-comer cannot guess the beauty been.", 13 Dec. 2014
I first was drawn to Robin Lloyd-Jones as a writer of fiction but I have also loved his non-fiction which shares masterly descriptive writing. The wonderful, clear prose style that illuminated Lloyd-Jones’s recent “The Sunlit Summit” is in evidence again here in this collection of pieces that celebrate the beauty the author has witnessed in the world around him on his many and varied travels. His lucid style is elegance personified and his observations are unerringly acute.

The title comes from a beautiful poem by Gerald Manley Hopkins (who never seemed to write anything that lacked beauty); while the inner sub-title “A collection of wilderness writing” captures the content of most of the book. Yet the essence of it all is harder to summarize. Profound reflections in these pages can take the writer – and reader – in all kinds of unexpected directions. There is, for example, a tribute and celebration of the work of poet Mark Ogle that I found immensely moving and humbling in more ways than one.

A thoughtful introduction places the following essays in an important context. The concluding article, the ‘title track’, were one talking of a music album, brings together the author’s thoughts on over fifty years of writing on landscapes.

I meant to use this collection as a book to pick up and read when I knew I only had a little time. The idea was to read one or two pieces, then put it back in my bag and pick it up again later. I still think this was a good idea but I found it so hypnotic that after two ‘sittings’ I found I only had the concluding chapter left to read. The inclusion of eighteen colour photos is a bonus in these days of publishers cutting back on such things.


The Sunlit Summit: The Life of W. H. Murray
The Sunlit Summit: The Life of W. H. Murray
by Robin Lloyd-Jones
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £18.94

5.0 out of 5 stars An effortless and rewarding climb, 13 Oct. 2013
This is a fascinating book about so many things that they are too many to list here, suffice to say if you are interested in life at all then there is much for you here. It is the story of a thinker, and adventurer and a beautiful prose writer and it is written in carefully crafted sentences and paragraphs that are as cool and clear as a highland stream and run as deep.


Compatible Black Laser Toner Cartridge for Brother HL-2250DN - (2600 pages @ 5% coverage)
Compatible Black Laser Toner Cartridge for Brother HL-2250DN - (2600 pages @ 5% coverage)
Offered by More Inks
Price: £17.99

5.0 out of 5 stars As ordered!, 27 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Product arrived in a timely manner and seems very reasonably priced. I am happy but I cannot review it as I won;t be using it until the pre-installed toner runs out.

So this is all I can say for now. Good price, fast delivery


Fallen Angels: Stories of Los Gamines
Fallen Angels: Stories of Los Gamines
Price: £5.81

5.0 out of 5 stars Unforgettable and Deeply Moving, 21 Oct. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The author went to South America and spent time there, in the "no-go" areas, the dangerous back-streets where the street children somehow survive brutal abuse, neglect and exploitation. He obviously learnt well when he was there and recreates a world most of us are lucky enough never to encounter and thus brings to the forefront of our thoughts topics we try so hard to avoid. You will never forget what you read here about their world, nor the characters so deftly drawn that they come to life before your very eyes.

Incidents are seared into the readers' consciousness and conscience. This book should do for current times what Charles Dickens's did for 19th Century and become a rallying point for change. "Hard Times", indeed.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 24, 2012 1:08 PM BST


Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah
Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah
by Tim Footman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well Worth Getting, 15 Dec. 2009
I find that other reviewers have already highlighted some of the things I found so enjoyable in the book. A major one being the engaging, seemingly easygoing style that simultaneously never treats the subject with less than the respect he deserves.

The "wry, sardonic humour" which the author describes his subject with would also do to cover the tone of the book which is set as early as the description of the author on page 4: "Tim Footman first encountered the words and music of Leonard Cohen in the early 1980s, through the medium of a budget six-track EP on the Pickwick label; he was particularly taken by the beret the singer was sporting in the cover photo." This lightness of tone does not divert the book from tackling serious subjects well.

You find out about Leonard Cohen and you get, or at least feel you get to know the author, too, whose character seeps through unobtrusively. You can imagine pleasantly chatting to him about Leonard over a few lemonades and not noticing time pass.

Another major plus is the deft way that Mr. Footman ropes in the aid of numerous other critics. Quoting other people very astutely allows him to cover a lot of ground very quickly as he catches the main thrusts of others' thoughts concisely by selecting the comments that encapsulate their point of view on Leonard.

It is not unnatural to find some things one disagrees with; I felt one passage showed enthusiasm leading to dubious overkill when, in discussing the mid 1960s, the subject of the biography was described as a "major performer of the era" Many names spring to mind to fit that description but dear old Leonard is not one of them. Still, over-enthusiasm is hardly a major crime and in any case this is extremely uncharacteristic of the approach overall.

I also thought that the final appendix - a contrived comparison of Dylan and Cohen as live performers (the latter is loved by his audience and the former not is the conclusion) - very unconvincing. Having been at well over a hundred Dylan gigs where the man was soaked in adulation, I found taking one 2008 show, and Cohen's view of it as representative of all, and then turning it into this thesis a very odd way to end the book. Apart from anything else, in 2008 Dylan had been touring every single year from 1986 without any financial need to do so, whereas Cohen was playing because of financial necessity to fans who hadn't seen him for a very long time.

That ends the book on an unusually wobbly note as otherwise it is extremely sure footed and I don't want this review to end negatively when I found the book so pleasurable, so I will conclude by saying that the first appendix on "Hallelujah" was absolutely sparkling. Tracing the song and its public reception from Cohen to Cale and onwards through numerous TV programmes (interestingly always used in the same manner whatever version is played) and on to Reality TV (the fair people of Norway blot their copybook by being the first to start this particularly nasty ball a-rolling) in various countries, culminating in the UK where a population dementedly feasts on a trashy reality-celebrity TV "culture". This crazed attention exploded two versions of the song into positions one and two on the charts at the same time (with the composer's version creeping in to the lower reaches too).

This appendix is a sterling bonus to a book already thoroughly well worth reading.


Bob Dylan: The Songs He Didn't Write: Bob Dylan Under the Influence
Bob Dylan: The Songs He Didn't Write: Bob Dylan Under the Influence
by Derek Barker
Edition: Paperback

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reference and Pleasure, 7 Dec. 2008
It isn't surprising that this book is right up my street; when I wrote my history of the Never Ending Tour I remarked often on the "extraordinary procession of traditional songs that Dylan would cover over the years of the N.E.T." and that "night after night, year after year, they have supplied the high points. So fully does Dylan inhabit these traditional numbers that they often sound more like Dylan songs than some he has penned himself". My main beef is that this wasn't around then for me to use as a reference work, or when I came to write my next book which discussed their effect on Dylan's own writing style and how he draws his inspiration from them. Unless you have spent hours researching songs for what turns out to be one passing reference and then multiply that a hundredfold for the study of any and every Dylan album in particular you'll not appreciate the huge amount of time it takes to track all this kind of information down.

For those dealing only in pleasure I see this book having many uses, I can imagine a dedicated collector listening to a recording from a show in say 1992 checking the background to a song he's never heard before popping up in the middle of the set, similarly anyone listening to a Dylan album with the odd cover on it, or a Dylan albums that are nothing but covers. It's also perfect just for opening at random and reading whatever your eye alights upon.


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