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Computer desk child office table PC work station office desk bedroom work desk PC office table station
Computer desk child office table PC work station office desk bedroom work desk PC office table station
Offered by DEUBA GmbH & Co. KG.
Price: £23.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A little bargain, 19 Jun. 2015
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Superb, little, unobtrusive computer desk that will fit perfectly in those cramped, tight spaces. At present, I've got a large IMac, an audio interface and an Apple keyboard sitting on top of it and it's reassuringly solid. It took very little time to assemble too. The overall quality of the build is far above what the price might indicate and anything similar would cost at least twice as much on the highstreet. Good for kids, certainly. Fine for adults too, if you're not planning on using that executive office chair. The wheels are an added bonus too if, like me, you need to re-arrange your room on occasion. Good value for money.


The Metabarons: Humanoids 40th Anniversary Edition
The Metabarons: Humanoids 40th Anniversary Edition
by Juan Gimenez
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £24.66

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A breathtaking read.., 1 Jun. 2015
Jodorowsky and Gimenez have teamed up for one of the most spectacular graphic space-operas in print. The plot traces the family history of the most ruthless and powerful warlords in the entire Jodorealm, spinning off from the seminal Incal series (which saw an equally impressive collaboration between Jodorowsky and the much-celebrated French artist, Moebius). The whole series has been combined into this one weighty tome, collectively forming a sci-fi bible of epic scope, imagination and proportions. Jodorowky's characteristic writing-blend of violence, sex, honour, proto-spiritualism, tongue-in-cheek humour and hair-brained science combines effortlessly with Gimenez's bold, intricate and hyperreal water-colour and ink work. Together, they build a stunning vision of a teeming, decadent and darkly twisted universe that is so tangible, it actually leaves a taste in your mouth. Get ready to be shocked and charmed in equal measure. A heads-up for the sci-fi buffs out there: heavy influences from Frank Herbert's Dune can be found throughout the plot. This, in my opinion, augments the effect of the work rather than detracts from it (Jodorowsky had been intending to direct his own film version of Dune a decade in advance of the David Lynch version, but the project fell through and many of his ideas consequently found their way into The Metabarons). To sum up, I can't recommend this book enough. It is a rollercoaster-ride with endless twists and turns, treacherous politics, moments of real poignancy and sheer balls-to-the-wall action. You don't have to be an aficionado of the Incal universe to enjoy it, since the work is pretty much self-referential. All in all, it's a seminal classic and an incredible literary and artistic achievement to boot. Knock yourselves out.


Monocyte
Monocyte
by Menton3
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £24.69

3.0 out of 5 stars Looks fantastic but...., 19 May 2015
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This review is from: Monocyte (Hardcover)
It's only fair that I begin with this book's strengths because, as with much of Menton3's material, the artwork is exemplary. Darkly gothic, menacing, strangely out-of-focus and yet defined at the same time, Menton3 provides us with a plethora of nightmarish, superbly-painted tableaux. His twisted characters and landscapes are starkly visualused, and seem to have been plucked straight out of some hellish, fantastical, auto-erotic dream. The oversized print and paper quality of the publication really help to bring the images to life. The plot (and I use the word lightly in this case) centres around the eternal battle between two immortal races who are diametrically opposed in methods (one achieving immortality through technology and the other having always been that way), but who both enslave humans to feed off and to do their unfathomable bidding. Their complacency and immortality are brought to an abrupt end when one of Death's harbingers (known as the Monocyte) is sent to destroy them. And that's as much as I can confidently glean from it all...because the downside is the overly-convoluted and pretentious writing. Ghanbari seems to be guilty of the same hubris as his godly protagonists, as he desperately over-reaches himself in an effort to conjure up their epic/archaic mode of speech, grammar and vocabulary. Far from adding authenticity to the dark world of Monocyte, he unwittingly ends up making the script read like a low-grade pastiche of a Shakespearean tragedy. Try to imagine a verbose Yoda paraphrasing The Old Testament, and you'll be getting close to the overall effect. It's full of big, ponderous words, often used in the wrong context and threaded together with some rather shaky stabs at 'ye olde' grammar. The result is a flaw-ridden script that is often long-winded, pompous, disappointingly lifeless and in dire need of simplification. But having said that, I can't deny that Monocyte has a certain infectious vibe and flavour about it. And secretly, I sort of enjoyed it too. Despite itself. With just a modicum of consideration for the reader, this book could have been a 5 star classic. But, in the final analysis, Monocyte never really gets past gazing at its own navel.


Twenty Questions EP
Twenty Questions EP
Price: £5.69

4.0 out of 5 stars Another solid production by the Lab, 10 Mar. 2015
This review is from: Twenty Questions EP (MP3 Download)
There's no doubt that Sabre, Stray and Halogenix (collectively known as Ivy Lab) bring bagfulls of talent and innovation to their table. We've already seen it in offerings such as Afterthought and Oblique, where precision beats collided with melancholic, deep chords, presided over by the wistful soul vocals of Frank Carter III. Their Missing Persons EP was also a cracker in the large part, so the prospect of a new EP certainly had my attention. As one should expect from these guys, the envelope has been pushed yet again..But this time they seem to be steering away from their smoother, liquid side and opting for a darker, broodier, harsher approach. The beats are much more 'kitchen sink' than before, with their usual, super-clean production making way for something that sounds more like a kind of punchy, updated Lo Fi. It's different, interesting and very well executed. The headlining track, Twenty Questions, is a vocal drum & bass track that bears most of the hallmarks of Ivy Lab's undeniable skill when it comes to the deep liquid genre. It's a proper stonker, but even this more familiar sound is laced with more noise and fuzz than you would probably be used to, The following two drum and bass tracks get progressively darker and more industrial-sounding with a fair amount of glitchy chopping to keep the ears alert. And then comes the big style-change...They drop the D&B and decide to throw some nu-wave Trip-Hoppy oddness on us. It's all freakish loops, nutty sounds and quirky, mistimed beats. It almost gives you the impression that they've let a monkey loose on a Fisherprice mat. Again, it's fascinating listening. BUT (and there is a but), although I can't fault Ivy Lab for putting their creative hats on and challenging convention, AND for doing it with such customary panache and flair, I can't help wondering why no particular tune on this EP ever seems to stick in my head. It's possible that while chasing the Holy Grail of technique, originality and innovation, Ivy Lab have briefly overlooked the importance of your everyday, garden-variety ear-worm. So, although there's some great work here, I'm not sure that I've witnessed the makings of the next memorable Ivy Lab 'classic'. Anyhoo, still a cracking EP, still worth it.


Unfabulous Five
Unfabulous Five
by Jerry Frissen
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £15.58

4.0 out of 5 stars Attack of the B-movie Luchadores, 23 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: Unfabulous Five (Hardcover)
Jerry Frissen's oddball vision of a B-movie Los Angeles policed by a gang of five, masked, has-been Luchadores is initially a bit of a head-scratcher. As you progress through the two bewildering chapters of the book, you may find yourself continually asking the question `WHY?`. WHY these guys in particular? WHY are they fighting random, semi-supernatural gangs that have no explicable motive, origin or reason for existence? WHY are idiot spacemen, amphibious hoods, criminal bands of geriatric actors and outrageous giant lizards thrown into the plot so frivolously without any understandable purpose or subtext? There's very little rhyme or reason in it all. And, to be honest, nor should you waste your time looking for it. It is simply what it is: just an outrageous, tongue-in-cheek dalliance set to the backdrop of L.A's colourful and cosmopolitan underbelly, with lashings of B-movie and Manga thrown in for good measure. There's fun, frolics and fighting aplenty, and some occasionally succinct and funny dialogue between the main protagonists (who all seem to be surprisingly well-defined as characters despite the fact that we never actually see their faces). Their keenly-written interactions and relationships are infused with warmth, passion and humour and are perhaps the real crux of the book: these are, after all, characters we can sympathise with (despite the sheer lunacy of the storylines). Bill's breathtaking artwork locks the whole thing into place perfectly with confident manga-influenced pencilling, stylized yet detailed settings, and gorgeous deep colours and dynamic shading which really bring the characters and city-scenes to life. Infact, it's probably thanks to Bill's visionary talent that the comic works so well on the whole. Frissen's script may seem a little off-beat and disjointed for some, and relies on the superb visuals to deliver it as smoothly and as vividly as possible. So to conclude, then, I enjoyed the overall experience of reading this quality hard-back print. It's colourful, quirky, playful AND charming to boot. But, is it a classic? Well, perhaps not. It may not make it into the top ten graphic novels of all time but that doesn't mean it's not worth a considered read. Just try not to keep asking 'WHY', suspend your disbelief, and allow yourself the indulgence of going with the flow...


Borgias, The (Manara Library)
Borgias, The (Manara Library)
by Alejandro Jodorowsky
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £45.00

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pope-tastic, 2 Feb. 2015
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Jodorowsky's epic foray into the genre of historical period-drama culminates in this heady, brutal and salacious collection of four books. They centre around the controversial ascendancy of the infamous Rodrigo Borgia to the papal throne in the late 15th century, and the rise and fall of his power-mad family. As one should expect from Jodo, it's a thoroughly involving read, driven on relentlessly by a provocative script that focuses on political, social and familial commentary, human greed and debauchery, sexual deviancy, the corrupting influence of power and (of course) some historical research too. Although, and let's face it, Jodo is not a man who will ever shy away from the wholesale use of artistic license as a vehicle for getting his message across, so keep a few pinches of salt handy (if not a few fists). This is not material for the faint-hearted or those of delicate sensibility, so be prepared to be seduced and disgusted in equal measure and enjoy the ride for what it is; a stark representation of how far individuals will go just to sit at the top of the foodchain. Jodo's writing is perfectly complemented by the opulent, graceful and sensual artwork of the legendary Milo Manara, whose watercolour and inking not only set a vivid scene, but seem (almost magically) to convey the flavour, lifestyle and decadence of 15th-16th century Italy. No mean feat. And it also gives us the rather rare treat of seeing Manara working in colour too, which is a major boon. The whole tome is luxuriously printed on quality paper and bound by thick board and a printed dustjacket, so you can definitely rest assured of its durability and quality. If you like your graphic novels with some edge, then I would heartily recommend this one. It really is an epic tour-de-force and well-deserves a position on your shelf.


The Zombies That Ate The World Book 1: Bring Me Back My Head!
The Zombies That Ate The World Book 1: Bring Me Back My Head!
by Guy Davis
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.99

4.0 out of 5 stars A clever, fresh take on an old subject., 25 Nov. 2014
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When faced with the prospect of reading this graphic novel, you could well be forgiven for scratching your head in frustration and groaning, 'Yet ANOTHER zombie comic?! Haven't there been enough already??'. The fact is, the market has been saturated by the whole zombie format for a while now. But rest assured, this particular book is a collection of linked tales that first appeared in the cult Metal Hurlant magazine as early as 2003. That's before the current 'jump on the bandwagon' ethic took the genre over and as a result, it feels fresher and quirkier than anything that's come out in recent years. The premise of the novel is that zombies have become an everyday part of life and are living side-by-side amongst us, with rights and privileges, but still stigmatized to a large degree (much as a nation might view an ethnic minority). It's a funny concept that leaves much scope for devilish satire and irreverent commentary on human social politics in general. This is what makes Jerry Frissen's schlocky visualization of a retro/futurist dystopia so attractive compared to your standard Zombie Apocalypse. The plot centres around Karl Neard (an acne-ridden Star Trek buff self-styled as a modern-day Indiana Jones) who, along with other similarly anti-heroic and pathetic characters, try to make a living in this 'brave new world' as zombie catchers. But in most cases, they end up playing the role of zombie fixers for decadently rich clients with darker impulses to satisfy. Yes, Jerry Frissen's world is pretty distasteful and macabre, but it's also hilarious and surprisingly close to the bone. Guy Davis's inking is superb as usual, with it's attractively scruffy linework and evocative detail and there's also some nice, atmospheric colouring by Charlie Kirchoff. The artwork has a kind of slipshod late 50's/early 60's retro-future look which works very well with Frissen's cheeky script. If you don't like compendiums of short stories, this may not be for you, but the tales are linked and often alluded to as you progress through the book. It's a fun read, and a great, fresh take on a much-rinsed subject. Zombie otaku will dig this, but the start/stop nature of the novel may put some readers off.


Contradictions
Contradictions
Price: £7.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Mediocre to be honest, 13 Nov. 2014
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This review is from: Contradictions (MP3 Download)
Skyweep has released some tasty offerings over the past two years. Anyone might think that, based on the potential we've seen from him, Contradictions would be an odds-on stonker of an album. And on the very rarest of occasions, it is. But the remaining 95% is pretty non-memorable and generic. If you like your Drum & Bass on the Liquid side, then Skyweep certainly delivers the formula but seems to have very little to add of his own on this particular outing. The beats are top-notch as usual, but the music is so 'old hat', simplified and predictable that it veers towards boring. It all feels like bare bones with very little fleshing out. Lots of muted, background stuff with a lack of interesting sound-design in the foreground. The fact that there are so many two-bar musical loops on the album seems to betray some creative weakness at play. It's almost as if Skyweep just has nothing to say at the moment, unless it's something he can sample and loop. Many of the vocals sound like straight sample rips that have been sped up, and only a couple seem to be real collaborations, which is a shame. As a result, Contradictions sounds a little rushed, empty and unfinished at times, as if he was going to go back and add more stuff but never got round to it. Having said that, the track 'Everytime' truly is a Liquid banger, worthy of any big-name compilation, but you don't need to buy the whole album for one classic.


Presence
Presence
Price: £7.49

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A modern D&B classic, 7 Nov. 2014
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This review is from: Presence (MP3 Download)
A real flagship Drum & Bass album for the Liquid/Intelligent/Lounge scene. In a world where music is gradually getting harder, dirtier and more synthetic, this offering from Tokyo Prose goes unashamedly against the grain. It feels smooth, organic, thoughtful and is peppered through with superb grooves. He uses a sound palette that almost smacks of French-style Nu Jazz, with dark wistful pianos, hollow washed-out pads, and creamy rolling basses. There are some nice vocals too, all of which help to create an overall sense of haunting depth and melancholic soul-searching. Ultimately, I would file Presence under the 'Late-night' music category but that doesn't mean you can't take it for a spin during the day. It's timeless, chilled, emotive, subtle, beautiful and totally distinctive with an underlying heartbeat of infectious clickety-click beats that keep you twitching till the end. Tokyo Prose has found his muse here, and it's rare/great to hear a body of work that sounds so inspired, considered and cohesive. In fact, Presence may well be a modern D&B classic. It certainly has the right charisma for it. But because it is so contrary to current trends, it may not appeal to everyone and may never (god forbid) get the recognition it deserves. Lover's of Liquid, Lounge, Nu Jazz or just plain old good music should take to this seminal work like fish in water.


Sweet Sunday EP
Sweet Sunday EP
Price: £3.96

5.0 out of 5 stars Hauntingly Groovy, 28 Oct. 2014
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This review is from: Sweet Sunday EP (MP3 Download)
The Liquid/Intelligent Drum & Bass genre has been steadily clawing a comeback recently. This is thanks, in part, to the talents of producers like Etherwood, Hybrid Minds and Ivy Lab who have done much to steer the style away from it's somewhat tired and over-used formula. And thankfully, a Moldavian producer called Skyweep also seems to have joined the cause with a superb release in the shape of the Sweet Sunday EP. It consists of four masterfully constructed tracks which instantly remind you why this genre, if handled the right way, is such a force to be reckoned with. It is a luscious mix of airy grooves on some very beautiful soundbeds, ranging from smooth synth and piano chords, to 80's style saxaphones and atmospheric vocals. The overall effect is quite beautiful and, more importantly, quite distinctive. Skyweep is carving out his own style here and not just trying to fulfill the expectations of the genre (just like all good, self-respecting producers should). Tracks like 'My Soul' and 'Sweet Sunday' almost stand in a genre of their own, with their haunting melodies and ambient chord-driven flow. Ultimately, this unassuming little EP is a real diamond in a sea of faceless fugazis and packs a creative punch far above its weight. If Skyweep can keep this quality going, he's sure to be a household name. I would recommend it to any fans of Drum & Bass who occasionally like to kick back and stare at the stars once in a while...


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