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Adrian Gonbar (Spain)

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Outsider
Outsider
Offered by Fulfillment Express
Price: £13.60

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hats off to these veteran rockers keeping the old flame alive, 23 Nov. 2014
This review is from: Outsider (Audio CD)
Having lost their path (broadly speaking) after John Lawton's departure circa 1979, the first three studio albums since Bernie Shaw joined the band (Sea of light 1995, Sonic Origami 1998 and Wake the Sleeper 2008) supposed a return to the elaborated hard rock, moderately tinged with progressive touches, that characterized the classic 1970's era of Uriah Heep, even though with an updated sound, and, some will tell, an overproduced and a bit cold one too. Bernie Shaw is not David Byron neither, his vocal range and dynamics are quite limited (he recalls me the more recent years of Ian Gillan, in which he's obviously shorter of voice), and can become a bit tiresome to listen to after a while, a fact that has risen some old Heep's fans criticisms. However, he's an efficient, very able singer, and, besides that, I think he could have a lot to do with a certain revitalization the band has experimented in the last 20 years (certainly I think the three aforementioned works are excellent).
2011's Into the Wild was a much more down to earth album, they almost completely forsook the prog-oriented ingredients, the elaborated melodies and rhythm patterns, and let a bit aside the primarly mystical/spiritual/gothic tinged lyrics to make an album of old fashioned uncomplicated hard rock, yet with a pair of terrible tracks (the cheesy "T-bird angel" and the draggy, Judas Priest-like "Kiss of freedom"), and a too repetitive opener, "Nail to the head", that becomes really boring after a few listenings, all of which seriously weakened the album as a whole.
Well, Outsider continues the path opened by Into the Wild, but to my taste it's a more accomplished album. I find no weak tracks here, just superbly well made old fashioned hard rock with lots of organ, vocal choruses and hooky passages. As it happened with Into the Wild, they seem to be having a good time while doing this album, a bunch of sixty-year-olds youngsters doing as they please (Box is 67, Lanzon 64 and Bernie Shaw, well, 58). Wise breaks and changes of pace make many of the songs even more appealing, and the band keeps on choosing a monolithic sound: no jamming at all and very little of soloing can be found, though there are moments of brilliance (the organ solo on the final track Say Goodbye is just astonishing).
In case you expect something impressive, you'll be disappointed, as no new land is treaded here. However Outsider is a wisely crafted piece of bona fide classic rock. I don't know how they manage to do this, maybe it's just me, but while treading so well-known territory, even well-worn if you want, at the same time, ironically enough, Outsider is remarkably fresh and powerful. Guess you'll enjoy it from your very, ... ahem, ... insides.


1001: Albums You Must Hear Before You Die
1001: Albums You Must Hear Before You Die
by Robert Dimery
Edition: Paperback

17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One of those books you must skip to save your time., 13 Nov. 2014
Arbitrary, uneven and unbalanced selection, and shallow comments that will teach you nothing. The Rolling Stone Magazine cohort and its disciples telling you what to listen to, and, by default, what music and artists to ignore. It would be nice if it was done with intellectual accuracy, but this is just a product, one destined to create opinion trends and to shape (or reaffirm) people's tastes without any artistic argument or any sense of historical significance. Buy it if you like the Rolling Stone magazine ways, trust the "best of" lists resulting from its nonsensical surveys, or think that the Grammy awards mean anything. Otherwise, read books by Ted Gioia, Charlie Gillett, Simon Frith, Peter Guralnick, Clinton Heylin and many other serious writers, read iconoclastic critics like Robert Christgau, use the All Music Guide site and Amazon's customers reviews as a loose reference when it comes to buy records, and listen, listen, listen ... Be curious, investigate, seek, and build your own musical background.

Editing on 16 November 2014:

I'm afraid of some people could think I'm just a hater, a troll ... or, who knows, a resentful musician ignored by the Rolling Stone Magazine. So, I just want to complement my review with some specific information.

I'm talking as someone who's been an engaged music listener since his early teens, back in the 1970's. I've got a pretty respectable collection of about 4000 records: roughly speaking I have 3200 albums between rock & pop, 400 blues' albums, and another 400 of jazz. Of course it doesn't make me the bearer of "the gospel truth" ( I'm very aware of the subjectivity factor ), but it does make me feel free to have one opinion or two about the relative value of many albums, and makes me also a bit less prone to be cheated by, let's say, "obscure marketing manoeuvres".

A book intended to be used as a listening guide will always be an imperfect one, no matter how well researched and written it be. A work like that should be considered just a very loose reference, a point of departure. However, the least we should demand to a work of that kind is a minimun of artistic rigour and historic perspective, for the book not to become a misleading one, instead of a rough guide.

Thus, I'll remark some facts regarding the book we're talking about.

1) These are a few examples of rock and pop (or vaguely related to those genres) artists who have been totally overlooked (0 album selected). All of them are first-rate artists, otherwise they're artists who at least have contributed some essential, landmark works, to the history of popular music:

Amon Düül II, Asian Dub Foundation, Bad Religion, Botch, J.J. Cale, Calexico, Terry Callier, Camel, Canned Heat, Caravan, Cluster, Bruce Cockburn, Converge, Crass, Karen Dalton, The Dead Boys, Ani Di Franco, The Dillinger Escape Plan, Dr Feelgood, Earth, Family, Robben Ford, Rory Gallagher, Gogol Bordello, Gong, Ben Harper, Roy Harper, Horslips, Humble Pie, Little Feat, Gordon Lightfoot, Guru Guru, Isis, Magma, Melvins, Mission of Burma, Morbid Angel, The Move, Neurosis, New Model Army, The Nice, Opeth, Oregon, Pink Fairies, Poco, Popol Vuh, Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM), Primus, Steve Reich, Terry Riley, Russian Circles, Joe Satriani, Klaus Schulze, The Seeds, Shellac, Sleep, Steeleye Span, Steppenwolf, Strawbs, Swans, The Jesus Lizard, Tool, Warren Zevon ... and, not forgivable distraction ... Chuck Berry (what a calamitous beginning really).

2) There are many great artists of whom an excessive number of albums have been selected: David Bowie (8), Elvis Costello (6), Sonic Youth (5), Iggy Pop (4, 2 of them with The Stooges), Metallica (4), The Byrds (5) , P. J. Harvey (4), Nick Drake (3) ... I love all of them, however it's apparent to me that for a list of only 1001 entries, there are too many albums by the aforementioned artists. The question is: in case you listen to only 1001 albums, do you need 6 by Costello, 5 by The Byrds and 5 by Sonic Youth, seriously ?

3) On the other hand, artists with a massive and varied discography are very poorly represented: Lou Reed (2: Transformer and Berlin), Van Morrsion (3), Frank Zappa (3), Jethro Tull (1) ...
Also should deserve a much better description: The Allman Brothers (1), Jeff Beck (1), King Crimson (2) ...
However, we see The Pixies (3), My Bloody Valentine (3), Wilco (3), Blur (3), U2 (4) ... all of them have made great, or at least interesting albums (well, ahem, Wilco really not) but, let's say, ¿ Do we need 3 albums by My Bloody Valentine, really ? Not enough with "Loveless" ? Yet while we are missing Jeff Beck's "Blow by Blow", Allman Brothers' "Brothers and Sisters", Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Second Helping", or Lou Reed's "New York" ?

4) Besides that, the authors select a laughable little quantity of blues and jazz records (i.e. Muddy Waters (2), J.L. Hooker (1), B.B. King (1), T. Monk (1), Mingus (1) and Miles Davis (4)). I don't get the point. What about the rest of not less important and equally well known blues and jazz artists ? There are no albums by Ornette Coleman, Pat Metheny, John McLaughlin, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Wayne Shorter, McCoy Tyner, ...., Big Bill Broonzy, Albert Collins, Lightnin' Hopkins, Son House, Howlin'Wolf, Robert Johnson, Skip James, Elmore James, Albert King, Charley Patton, Otis Taylor, Stevie Ray Vaughan, T-Bone Walker, Sonny Boy Williamson I & II, Johnny Winter ...

5) More or less the same could be said about the selection of, for example, African and Brazilian artists. The book sticks to the three or four well-known names. Not even all of them. Where are Angelique Kidjo or Gilberto Gil, just to name two of the ignored ones ?. Still more: why not, just saying, Argentinian, Spanish or Italian artists then ?

6) Regarding the points 4 and 5, I can't help but thinking that by mentioning a few blues, jazz, African and Brazilian trite artist's names, the book pretends a supposed open-mindedness which is really a reaffirmation of the opposite. I mean, the misleading statement we could illustrate this way:

Q: What's worth listening to outside British and American rock and pop ?
A: Well, Muddy Waters, B.B. King, Miles Davis, Youssou N'Dour, Elis Regina, ... and mostly that's all. Is there anything else out there ?

It woud have been much better to stick to the British and American rock and pop, make a fair selection under a honest artistic and historic perspective, and leave the other genres (blues, jazz, the so called "world music", etc.) to the writers who have a vast knowledge on those fields.

7) And finally, of course, maybe 40 % of the albums selected for the book aren't worth one second of your life. You can imagine the proper adjectives and related words, depending on each case: corporate, commercial, MTV, Rolling Stone's Poll, Grammy, hipster, snobbish, poser, void product, ersatz, fake, garbage, ...

According to this book you MUST listen to Hanoi Rocks, Culture Club, Human League, 10 cc, Meat Loaf, Abba, ABC, Travis, Cindy Lauper, The Slits, Robbie Williams, Pet Shop Boys, Alanis Morissette, The Go-Go's, Eminem, Bon Jovi, Slipknot, Arctic Monkeys, The Strokes, Kanye West, Adele, Coldplay, Kid Rock, The Cardigans, The Fun Lovin' Criminals .... but you can rest in peace without having listened to Chuck Berry.

Draw your own conclusions. I might be completely wrong.
Comment Comments (6) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 3, 2015 10:06 PM GMT


Lulu
Lulu
Offered by mrtopseller
Price: £3.45

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Kind of XXI century's “Berlin” in a sense., 4 Oct. 2014
This review is from: Lulu (Audio CD)
First of all, Lulu is not a Metallica's album, although the band contributed not only its committed playing, but also a good part of the music's credits (to a great extent improvised). Instead, this is rather another “difficult” Lou Reed's album. A set of songs on sick sex-lust-love-hate relationships, power, abuse, perversion, sleaze, degradation, self-destruction, inner struggle, guilt, bad fate, emptiness, solitude, desperation ... yet also not so evident touches of innocence and tenderness.
“Lulu” is no ordinary material. It is based on two plays written by the German dramatist Frank Wedekind: “Earth Spirit” (1895) and “Pandora's Box” (1904), known as “the Lulu plays”. These works had previously inspired Pabst's silent movie “Pandora's Box” (1929), and Alban Berg's opera “Lulu” (1937). Much more recently, dramatist and Reed's familiar collaborator Robert Wilson was working in a new adaptation of the original plays, and through Wilson's theater project Lou became interested in making some music based on Lulu.
Then, as Mark Deming (All Music Guide) notes, in this album “Lou Reed sings from the perspective of a young woman who is corrupted by her experiences with men, as well as some of the characters she meets”.
I'm using the verb “to sing” and the noun “song” in their broadest sense here. I'm not the one to discuss the exact meaning of those concepts (a task that exceeds my knowledge, yet I confess that I don't care much about it). But certainly most of the songs have no melody at all, no chorus, some of them not even a defined key (the only “straight” song being “Iced Honey”). Reed recites the lyrics with the mastery he has exhibited many times before, while Metallica, plus a strings quartet and some electronics played by Sarth Calhoun, set the sonic landscape. This sonic landscape varies from heavy metal riffs, to free-jazz like noise to ambient music passages (the most notable of the latter being the final 10 minutes of the heartrending “Junior Dad”, which closes the album).
Thus, Lulu will infuriate both Metallica fans expecting a new thrash metal delivery with “guest vocalist” Lou Reed as well as Lou Reed fans expecting a more “classic” Reed's set of songs (whatever that means). The big picture about people's tastes and perceptions is hugely complex, but I guess there will always exist extreme reactions from people who tend to call pretentious the slightest sign of intellectual elaboration and/or cultural allusion, as well as people who tend to consider vulgar, passé, primitive and childish any display of ballsy heavy metal riffs. In short, in the matter at hand, a heavy metal “purist” vs. hypster/pseudy/snob war nobody wins. Some people think this album is a troll plotted by two famous names who had run out of inspiration and just wanted to attract attention, cash in, and so on. On the contrary I think this album is the result of a honest and courageous experiment they didn't need to do for the sake of fame and money, and being aware of the fact that not all of the “fans” were going to be obliged to like it. Sometimes the artists we love mature faster than us, or at least faster than we would like, and they leave behind some ideas and some ways we relate to our fondest youthful feelings and our perception of authenticity. You can stick forever with Ride the Lightning and/or Transformer, and that's a respectable choice, but you could also follow the evolution of your beloved artists trying to understand and relate the links which lead from one work to another, and so maybe enjoying all, or most of them.
The album requires to be approached without preconceptions, good disposition and a bit of patience: I estimate that at least three spins, 87 minutes each, are needed to begin to appreciate its merits, since Lulu is definitely a grower.
Does this experiment work ? Most of the time it does, despite there are sparse moments where the synergy fails, especially in the song Little Dog, where I feel Metallica are completely lost, seemingly not knowing what to do (a more jazz trained drummer, with more subtletly, dynamics and fresher ideas, would have greatly fit in this song, not to say, just dreaming, a guitar player like Robert Fripp).
But despite its minor flaws, this album, not being as much a milestone work as Berlin was, shares with it the fate of being a risky, compelling and strong, but difficult work, with a similar shocking, hard to assimilate material, which has been mostly not well received by critics and audience. However I'm pretty sure that, like it happened to Berlin, Lulu will become more appreciated as time passes by.


Fellowes CD Jewel Case - Storage CD jewel case - capacity: 1 CD - transparent...
Fellowes CD Jewel Case - Storage CD jewel case - capacity: 1 CD - transparent...
Offered by Vision Media Store
Price: £6.95

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good enough, 11 Sept. 2014
I often need to replace CDs' jewel cases (those which have broken during transport, or those which look very scratched or not very clean when it comes to some second hand CDs). It seems to be more and more difficult to find good quality jewel cases, so it was a nice surprise when I "spotted" these ones in my town. Yes, they are made in China, but they are undoubtedly better than the quite brittle Ver**tim, and of course vastly better than the ultra-cheap ones, with many burrs left, loose parts and bending chewing-gum-like cover piece that you can see in the typical Chinese pound shops. Not as good as Hama (also made in China, certainly), but more than acceptable. For the curious: they weigh 58 grams each, whereas a "original", out of the factory CD jewel case weighs 69 grams. Nonetheless, they almost look and feel like "the real thing". In short, they could be better, but they're still good enough. Recommended.


We Live Here
We Live Here

3.0 out of 5 stars Lounge break, 22 Feb. 2014
This review is from: We Live Here (Audio CD)
Ok. I'm ready for you to call me a too formal and uncompromising guy, but this is to me one of the few dispensable Pat Metheny records (I own, and mostly love, about 40 of his albums, from Bright Size Life to Kin).
I understand different points of view, though. For example his right to relax and simply have a good time making a non emotionally demanding, dramatic, moving or cerebral music (by the way other guitar greats have done so, v.g. John Scofield or Bill Frisell). I also consider, as another reviewer suggested, that this album could be a wise move in order to attract new followers to his body of work as a whole. So, no problem, I will not condemn Pat to the eternal fire for this. Musicians are human beings, and have their right to change, play, try a new register, embody a transitory different character, relax, have fun, experiment, even if that leaves some fans baffled or disappointed.
But that doesn't change the fact that this album is what it is. In my humble opinion, a masterfully well executed piece of good-time, entertaining music, which probably could've been written and played by someone else. I'm not interested in lounge, smooth jazz and so on. To me this album lacks the most notable and unique Pat Metheny impressions as an artist (which have to do with virtuosity accompanied by emotion, depth, a feel of trascendece and spiritual quest) and in that sense, is a disappointing one. Could I give this album 5 stars as if it was Offramp, Secret Story, The Way Up and many more ? Definitely not. Just enjoyable.


Unstoppable Momentum
Unstoppable Momentum
Offered by skyvo-direct
Price: £5.58

6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It never gathers momentum, really, 9 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Unstoppable Momentum (Audio CD)
If this was the first Joe Satriani's album we surely would be impressed by his guitar playing skills and his unique musical vocabulary. But that's not the case, of course, and considering the strenghts of his stunning body of work this is a rather weak, almost pedestrian effort, and arguably one of his few dispensable studio albums to date.

My very first impression was of a terribly uninspired album, full of easy cliches in the form of poppy melodies or, on the contrary, well-worn plodding heavy-rock riffs.
Further listenings (with headphones, which I recommend for a fuller enjoyment of this album) made me discover some charms and subtle details which save this one from being a totally unworthy set.

In short, the first six songs are well crafted "Satrianis". No new ground is treaded on this first half, but it's satisfactory enough. Maybe "Three sheets to the wind" is better than average, a really inspired, swinging and spirited song that joyfully plays with a "trombonish" a la Beatles leitmotiv: this one is by far the more exciting track on the album. This first and best half ends with "A door into summer", which could be a bit too poppy song to the taste of some Satch fans, but it's a good one: catchy, round, with a fully developed musical idea.

From "Shine on American dreamer" and on, fully developed ideas are precisely what one misses: the last 5 songs seem to be a (self)copy & paste affair. On "Jumpin' in" and "Jumpin' out" Joe just seems to mimic himself in his "Delta blues a la R.L. Burnside" and "Oriental flavour" sides, respectively. The deja-vu feeling is painfully inevitable. "The weight of the world" is kind of Satriani meets Alan Parsons for unmitigated boring result. Finally, the bland and simple "A celebration", somehow reminiscent of the great classic "Whisky in the Jar", makes me regard the latter almost as if it was a Mahler's symphony.

So, after the rather risky and adventurous "Black Swans and Wormhole Wizards", which I liked so much, this album is a big disappointment. Obviously every artist with a long and prolific career must have his ups and downs. Satriani is still a musician at the height of his powers, thus better works are yet to come, I hope.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 25, 2013 6:48 PM BST


The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration
The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration
Offered by MediaMerchants
Price: £5.14

8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The 30th Anniversary "Bob Fest" (according to Neil Young), 24 April 2013
Notice: this is not a Bob Dylan's album. This is obviously a mixed bag one, yet I'm afraid that the good performances included here are not enough in quantity, or so impressive, in order to make up for the final result. If you are not a casual Dylan fan, you most likely will not need this (unless you want to own it anyway because you are a completist or because of its symbolic significance, I mean, the friends who gather to pay homage to Dylan's then 30 years long recording career).

The problem is that it's very difficult to split Dylan's songs from Dylan's own performances. Much more, I think, than in the case of the majority of other colleagues which have an unique style too. His voice, his phrasing, the way he plays with metrics and intonation, his breathing, his tempo and his unsteady tuning make a whole thing together with the meaning and the intention of what he's singing. So, for instance, he can be romantic or idealistic without sounding cheesy, naive, boring or sickly ... and so on ... if you're into Dylan you know we could continue talking forever about his performing qualities.

Sadly, that can't be said of the likes of Stevie Wonder singing "Blowing in the wind" (after a sickly introduction that would fit perfectly on a Coke ad), or The O'Jays singing "Emotionally Yours" in their overelaborated virtuosistic gospel style. In both cases you can imagine tons of honey and sugar dropping from the corner of their mouths. Honestly unbearable to me.
Eddie Vedder and Tracy Chapman are more than decent, but also boring, on their renditions of "Masters of war" and "The times they are a -changin'" respectively. Back in 1992 it could be nice to listen to the new generation socially involved musicians paying tribute to Bob, but once the moment has passed, these performances have lost most of their interest.
Giants like Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson make forgettable versions of "It ain't me, babe" and "What was it you wanted". Equally forgettable are the rest of the traditionalist renditions by Kristofferson ( I'll be your baby tonight), The Clancy Brothers (When the ship comes in) and Carpenter/Rosanne Cash/Shawwn Colvin (You ain't going nowhere). To be honest, all of them make decent and respectful versions, and bring the songs to their own territiories, but the result is far from being engaging.
Eric Clapton tortures our ears with a blues version of "Don't think twice it's all right". Not a bad idea in itself, but his singing is really weak, and, as he was beginning to do so often by those years, he "overplays" his mosquito-like-distorted guitar, inserting completely out of place uninspired licks, supposed to be "incendiary", but which simply are well-worn licks played fast: those cliche phrases that mediocre blues guitarists make use of when they have run out of ideas but still want to impress the audience anyway. Simply irritating.
Ron Wood (Seven days), a lessened lineup of The Band (When I paint my masterpiece), Chrissie Hynde (I shall be released) and Roger McGuinn (Mr Tambourine Man) make their job just ok, in a predictable and correct vein. McGuinn in particular sounds almost exactly as if it was 1965 and he was backed by the rest of The Byrds, that is, a rather tepid nostalgia exercise.

So, what's left on the positive side ? Here it is, to my taste:

John Mellencamp provides honest and powerful (yet not revolutionary) renditions of "Like a rolling stone" and "Leopard- skin- pill- box hat", both with great accompaniment from Al Kooper (organ), Lisa Germano (violin) and Pat Peterson (stunning vocals on the first song), among others.
Lou Reed does supremely well the obscure "Foot of pride", a song that perfectly fits his persona.
In the same way, Johnny Winter performs "Highway 61 revisited" as if it was specially written for him.
Richie Havens sings "Just like a woman" in his unique moving, thrilling way. This is arguably the most memorable rendition in the whole set.
A very spirited Neil Young raises the temperature playing full-blooded versions of "Just like Tom Thumb's blues" and "All along the watchtower" while the backing band sounds like Crazy Horse (well ... it almost does so).
George Harrison enthusiastically sings a propulsive "Absolutely sweet Marie".
Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers play a convincing version of "License to kill" and a playful, spirited and enjoyable "Rainy day women".

Finally, some opinions about the last four songs on the album, featuring The Man himself.
Dylan alone with his guitar plays "It's alright, Ma (I'm only bleeding)". It's just an ok, not especially memorable performance.
It is followed by a rendition of "My back pages" performed a la Byrds' style (with McGuinn, Petty, Young, Clapton, Dylan and Harrison alternately taking over the singing dues), and afterwards comes the umpteen necessary (in the bad sense) version of "Knocking on heaven's door", with the participation of all the guest musicians. The latter is especially boring, ordinary and slightly pretentious (though fortunately not too long), and of course, both songs are partially ruined by "God" guitar solos.
Finally, Bob returns alone for a really beautiful version of "Girl from the North Country", making the song to be perceived as necessary (in the good sense), not a filler or a randomly chosen encore, closing the set with a touch of real emotion and good taste.

That said, the prevailing feeling is disappointment. I guess all this made much more sense for the people who were there (by the way, the entire show was 4 hours long), enjoying the party-like spirit of the celebration in a relaxed mood and not exclusively focused on the musical performances.

I know I might seem a bit much too uncompromising, but if not for the unfortunate performances of Steve Wonder, The O'Jays and Clapton, I would have rated this album with 3 stars (that said, I like many Steve Wonder songs, and I love most of Clapton's recordings until 1980, more or less).


Lemon Popsicles and Strawberry Milkshakes Vol.2
Lemon Popsicles and Strawberry Milkshakes Vol.2
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £4.20

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Value for money, 1 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is basically a Pop hits collection drawn from the second half of the fifties.

Undoubtedly the recordings have been processed in order to eliminate hiss and to balance the differences in volume among such uneven sources. The sound in general is just ok, quite clear but a bit lifeless too (I guess this is due to the total elimination of noise, which somehow gives the sound an artificial quality). Apart from that, the low frequencies are "beefed up" and there's a certain lack of nuances and detail. Thus, the sound by no means can be compared to the superb remaster job usually made by Bear Family Records and some other companies dedicated to reissue music from the forties and fifties, but, that said, it's more than acceptable.

There's a regrettable lack of information, as there are no notes at all, not even the recording dates. The tracks don't follow a chronological order, or any other recognizable rule. As well the selection of songs itself seems to be rather hit-and-miss, yet it is true that all of the recordings have been popular singles.

In short, considering its low price, this is a recommendable box set for casual or nostalgic listeners and for those who, like me, are interested in the history of rock and pop music or simply feel curious about the hits that people were listening to by those years on the radio, TV shows, jukeboxes, dancehalls or whatever.

I took care to seek the release year for each song, so here's the complete track listing accompanied by that information.

LEMON POPSICLES AND STRAWBERRY MILKSHAKES VOL. 2

CD 1

1. Travellin' light. Cliff Richard. 1959
2. It really doesn't matter anymore. Buddy Holly. 1959
3. Mr blue. The Fleetwoods. 1959
4. High school confidential. Jerry Lee Lewis. 1958
5. It's late. Ricky Nelson. 1959
6. Rock and roll is here to stay. Danny and the Juniors. 1958
7. Somethin' else. Eddie Cochran. 1959
8. Teenager in love. Dion and the Belmonts. 1959
9. Only sixteen. Sam Cooke. 1959
10. I want to walk you home. Fats Domino. 1959
11. Born to be with you. The Chordettes. 1956
12. Why. Frankie Avalon. 1959
13. Yes tonight Josephine. Johnnie Ray. 1957
14. Honeycomb. Jimmie Rodgers. 1957
15. Stupid Cupid. Connie Francis. 1958
16. Smoke gets in your eyes. The Platters. 1958
17. Mack the knife. Bobby Darin. 1959
18. Heartaches by the number. Guy Mitchell. 1959
19. (`Till) I kissed you. The Everly Brothers. 1959
20. Side Saddle. Russ Conway. 1959
21. Here comes summer. Jerry Keller. 1959
22. The day the rains came. Jane Morgan. 1958
23. Butterfly. Charlie Gracie. 1956
24. The three bells. The Browns. 1959
25. Sleepwalk. Santo and Johnny. 1959

CD 2

1. Battle of New Orleans. Lonnie Donegan. 1959
2. Put your head on my shoulder. Paul Anka. 1959
3. What'd I say. Ray Charles. 1959
4. Come on let's go. Ritchie Valens. 1958
5. Lonely teardrops. Jackie Wilson. 1958
6. I want you to be my girl. Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers. 1956
7. Charlie Brown. The Coasters. 1959
8. Carol. Chuck Berry. 1958
9. Dedicated to the one I love. The Shirelles. 1959
10. Go Jimmie go. Jimmy Clanton. 1959
11. Mad about the boy. Julie London. 1958
12. Sea of love. Marty Wilde. 1959
13. The girl can't help it. Little Richard. 1956
14. Personality. Lloyd Price.1959
15. Kansas City. Wilbert Harrison. 1959
16. I only have eyes for you. Flamingos. 1959
17. Blue suede shoes. Carl Perkins. 1956
18. Mambo Nº 5. Perez Prado. 1949 ? 1955 ?
19. Dreamboat. Alma Cogan. 1955
20. Little white bull. Tommy Steele. 1959
21. Seven little girls. Paul Evans. 1960 ?
22. Tiger. Fabian. 1959
23. A white sports coat. Marty Robbins. 1957
24. With all my heart. Petula Clark. 1957
25. Tammy. Debbie Reynolds. 1957

CD 3

1. Sugar moon. Pat Boone. 1958
2. Fire down below. Shirley Bassey. 1957
3. There goes my baby. The Drifters. 1959
4. Hummingbird. Les Paul and Mary Ford. 1955
5. Starry eyed. Michael Holliday. 1960
6. Rock and roll waltz. Kay Starr. 1956
7. Blue jean bop. Gene Vincent. 1956
8. A fool such as I. Elvis Presley. 1959
9. Raw hide. Link Wray. 1959
10. 26 miles (Santa Catalina). The Four Preps. 1957
11. Silhouettes. The Diamonds. 1957
12. Don't knock the rock. Bill Haley & the Comets. 1956
13. Love makes the world go `round. Perry Como. 1958
14. The Tijuana jail. The Kingston Trio. 1958 ?
15. Dreams can tell a lie. Nat King Cole. 1956
16. Misty. Johnny Mathis. 1959
17. Little star. The Elegants. 1958
18. One step at a time. Brenda Lee. 1957
19. Are you sincere. Andy Williams. 1958
20. Sugartime. The McGuire Sisters. 1957
21. Mambo italiano. Rosemary Clooney. 1954
22. A very precious love. Doris Day. 1957
23. Volare. Dean Martin. 1958
24. I go ape. Neil Sedaka. 1959
25. What a difference a day makes. Dinah Washington. 1959
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 21, 2013 7:08 PM GMT


Lemon Popsicles and Strawberry Milkshakes- Rock & Roll Heart Throbs
Lemon Popsicles and Strawberry Milkshakes- Rock & Roll Heart Throbs
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £2.92

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Value for money. But beware: this is by no means an exclusively Rock'n'roll collection, 1 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is mostly a 1959-1960 Pop, R&B and Rock'n'Roll hits collection. As most of the other LP & SM titles it combines american and british popular artists of the time.

Undoubtedly the recordings have been processed in order to eliminate hiss and to balance the differences in volume among such uneven sources. The sound in general is just ok, quite clear but a bit lifeless too (I guess this is due to the total elimination of noise, which somehow gives the sound an artificial quality). Apart from that, the low frequencies are "beefed up" and there's a certain lack of nuances and detail. Thus, the sound by no means can be compared to the superb remaster job usually made by Bear Family Records and some other companies dedicated to reissue music from the forties and fifties, but, that said, it's more than acceptable.

There's a regrettable lack of information, as there are no notes at all, not even the recording dates. The tracks don't follow a chronological order, or any other recognizable rule. As well the selection of songs itself seems to be rather hit-and-miss, yet it is true that all of the recordings have been popular singles.

In short, considering its low price, this is a recommendable box set for casual or nostalgic listeners and for those who, like me, are interested in the history of rock and pop music or simply feel curious about the hits that people were listening to by those years on the radio, TV shows, jukeboxes, dancehalls or whatever.

I took care to seek the release year for each song, so here's the complete track listing accompanied by that information.

ROCK & ROLL HEART THROBS

CD 1

1. It's now or never. Elvis Presley. 1960
2. Please don't tease. Cliff Richard. 1960
3. Rubber ball. Bobby Vee. 1960
4. Poetry in motion. Johnny Tillotson. 1960
5. Three steps to heaven. Eddie Cochran. 1960
6. Poor me. Adam Faith. 1960
7. Wonderous place. Billy Fury. 1960
8. Running bear. Johnny Preston. 1960
9. Wonderful world. Sam Cooke. 1960
10. Calendar girl. Neil sedaka. 1961
11. Come on let's go. Tommy Steele. 1958
12. Tell Laura I love her. Ricky Valance. 1960
13. Little girl. Marty Wilde. 1960
14. Pretty blue eyes. Craig Douglas. 1960
15. Why?. Frankie Avalon. 1959
16. Do you mind?. Anthony Newley. 1960
17. Ain't misbehavin'. Tommy Bruce & The Bruisers. 1960
18. Be mine. Lance Fortune. 1960
19. I love the way you love. Marv Johnson. 1960
20. Just a little too much. Ricky Nelson. 1959
21. Pistol packin'mama. Gene Vincent. 1960
22. My love for you. JohnnyMathis. 1960
23. Think. James Brown. 1960
24. Good timin'. Jimmy Jones. 1960
25. The twist. Chubby Checker. 1960

CD 2

1. Only the lonely. Roy Orbison. 1960
2. Dream lover. Bobby Darin. 1959
3. Wild one. Bobbty Rydell. 1960
4. Teen angel. Mark Dinning. 1960
5. Cathy's Clown. The Everly Brothers. 1960
6. Chain gang. Sam Cooke. 1960
7. Shazam !. Duane Eddy . 1960
8. Bad boy. Marty Wilde. 1959
9. Hello, young lovers. Paul Anka. 1960
10. Kiddio. Brooke Benton. 1960
11. Tiger. Fabian. 1959
12. Dreamin'. Johnny Burnette. 1960
13. Way down yonder in New Orleans. Freddy Cannon. 1960
14. Another sleepless night. Jimmy Clanton. 1960
15. Learning the game. Buddy Holly. 1959
16. Somethin' else. Eddie Cochran. 1959
17. Sugar moon. Pat Boone. 1958
18. It's late. Ricky Nelson. 1959
19. Because they're young. James Darren. 1960
20. The darktown strutters' ball. Joe Brown & The Bruvvers. 1960
21. Lonely pup . Adam Faith. 1960
22. What a mouth (What a a North and South). Tommy Steele. 1960
23. Strawberry fair. Anthony Newley. 1960
24. What do you want to make those eyes ... Emile Ford and the Checkmates. 1959
25. Are you lonesome tonight? Elvis Presley. 1960

CD 3

1. A teenager in love. Dion and the Belmonts. 1959
2. You're sixteen. Johnny Burnette. 1960
3. Handy man. Jimmy Jones. 1959
4. Blue angel. Roy Orbison. 1960
5. When will I be loved? The Everly Brothers. 1960
6. Starry eyed. Michael Holliday. 1960
7. Portrait of my love. Matt Monro. 1960
8. True love ways. Buddy Holly. 1960
9. Stairway to heaven. Neil Sedaka. 1960
10. I love you. Cliff Richard. 1960
11. Puppy love. Paul Anka. 1960
12. Clementine. Bobby Darin. 1960
13. Turn me loose. Fabian. 1959
14. Cradle of love. Johnny Preston. 1960
15. The heart of a teenage girl. Craig Douglas. 1960
16. Slow boat to China. Emile Ford and the Checkmates. 1960
17. You got what it takes. Marv Johnson. 1960
18. Walking the floor over you. Pat Boone. 1960
19. Here comes summer. Jerry Keller. 1959
20. The Village of St. Bernadette. Andy Williams. 1960
21. Misty. Johnny Mathis. 1959
22. Earth angel. Johnny Tillotson. 1960
23. Swingin' school. Bobby Rydell. 1960
24. Stuck on you. Elvis Presley. 1960
25. Itsy bitsy teenie weenie yellow polka dot bikini. Brian Hyland. 1960


Lemon Popsicles & Strawberry Milkshakes: Rock N Roll No. 1's
Lemon Popsicles & Strawberry Milkshakes: Rock N Roll No. 1's
Price: £7.62

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Value for money. But beware: this is by no means an exclusively Rock'n'roll collection, 1 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a (mostly) late fifties Pop, R&B and Rock'n'Roll hits collection. Really less than half of the songs could be considered as Rock'n'roll.

Undoubtedly the recordings have been processed in order to eliminate hiss and to balance the differences in volume among such uneven sources. The sound in general is just ok, quite clear but a bit lifeless too (I guess this is due to the total elimination of noise, which somehow gives the sound an artificial quality). Apart from that, the low frequencies are "beefed up" and there's a certain lack of nuances and detail. Thus, the sound by no means can be compared to the superb remaster job usually made by Bear Family Records and some other companies dedicated to reissue music from the forties and fifties, but, that said, it's more than acceptable.

There's a regrettable lack of information, as there are no notes at all, not even the recording dates. The tracks don't follow a chronological order, or any other recognizable rule. As well the selection of songs itself seems to be rather hit-and-miss, yet it is true that all of the recordings have been popular singles.

In short, considering its low price, this is a recommendable box set for casual or nostalgic listeners and for those who, like me, are interested in the history of rock and pop music or simply feel curious about the hits that people were listening to by those years on the radio, TV shows, jukeboxes, dancehalls or whatever.

I took care to seek the release year for each song, so here's the complete track listing accompanied by that information.

ROCK 'N' ROLL Nº 1's

CD 1

1. Wooden heart. Elvis Presley. 1961
2. Reet Petite. Jackie Wilson. 1957
3. The twist. Chubby Checker. 1960
4. Stay. Murice Williams & The Zodiacs. 1960
5. Save the last dance for me. The Drifters. 1960
6. Mack the Knife. Bobby Darin. 1959
7. Come softly to me. The Fleetwoods. 1959
8. Stagger Lee. Lloyd Price. 1959
9. Alley Oop. Hollywood Argyles. 1960
10. Cathy's Clown. The Everly Brothers. 1960
11. Butterfly. Charlie Gracie. 1956
12. Living Doll. Cliff Richard. 1959
13. Claudette. The Everly Brothers. 1958
14. I want to be wanted. Brenda Lee. 1960
15. Teen Angel. Mark Dinning. 1960
16. Tequila. Champs. 1958
17. Whole lotta woman. Marvin Rainwater. 1958
18. Only you. The Platters. 1955
19. Get a job. The Silhouettes. 1957
20. Hound dog. Elvis Presley. 1956
21. Yakety Yak. The Coasters. 1958
22. Poor little fool. Ricky Nelson. 1958
23. Venus. Frankie Avalon. 1959
24. Sleep Walk. Santo & Johnny. 1959
25. At the hop. Danny & The Juniors. 1957

CD 2

1. What do you want ?. Adam Faith. 1959
2. Please don't tease. Cliff Richard. 1960
3. Dream lover. Bobby Darin. 1959
4. It's only make believe. Conway Twitty. 1958
5. Poetry in motion. Johnny Tillotson. 1960
6. Are you lonesome tonight. Elvis Presley. 1960
7. Why. Frankie Avalon. 1959
8. I'm sorry. Brenda Lee. 1960
9. Twilight time. The Platters. 1958
10. Lonely boy. Paul Anka. 1959
11. Mr Blue. The Fleetwoods. 1959
12. To know him is to love him. The Teddy Bears. 1958
13. It's all in the game. Tommy Edwards. 1958
14. You send me. Sam Cooke. 1957
15. Who's sorry now. Connie Francis. 1957
16. Love letters in the sand. Pat Boone. 1957
17. Starry eyed. Michael Holliday. 1960
18. Do you mind?. Anthony Newley. 1960
19. A fool such as I. Elvis Presley. 1958
20. I love you. Cliff Richard. 1960
21. Tell Laura I love her. Ricky Valance. 1960
22. It doesn't matter anymore. Buddy Holly. 1959
23. What tdo you want to make those I at me for?. Emile Ford & The Checkmates. 1959
24. Will you love me tomorrow. The Shirelles. 1960
25. Smoke gets in your eyes. The Platters. 1958

CD 3

1. Great balls of fire. Jerry Lee Lewis. 1957
2. Jailhouse rock. Elvis Presley. 1957
3. That'll be the day. Buddy Holly & The Crickets. 1957
4. Only the lonely. Roy Orbison. 1960
5. Wake up little Susie. The Everly Brothers. 1957
6. Shakin' all over. Johnny Kidd and The Pirates. 1960
7. Three steps to heaven. Eddie Cochran. 1960
8. Stupid cupid. Connie Francis. 1958
9. Diana. Paul Anka. 1957
10. Kansas City. Wilbert Harrison. 1959
11. Only Sixteen. Craig Douglas. 1959
12. Good timin'. Jimmy Jones. 1960
13. Poor me. Adam Faith. 1960
14. When. The Kalin Twins. 1958
15. Ain't that a shame. Pat Boone. 1955
16. Party doll. Buddy Knox. 1957
17. Little star. The Elegants. 1958
18. The great pretender. The Platters. 1955
19. Honeycomb. Jimmie Rodgers. 1957
20. Travellin' light. Cliff Richard. 1959
21. Here comes summer. Jerry Keller. 1959
22. All shook up. Elvis Presley. 1957
23. Bird dog. The Everly Brothers. 1958
24. Why do fools fall in love. Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers. 1956
25. Rock around the clock. Bill Haley & The Comets. 1954


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