Profile for I. T. Turner > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by I. T. Turner
Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,975,332
Helpful Votes: 60

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
I. T. Turner (South Wales, UK.)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Mere Apologetics: How To Help Seekers And Skeptics Find Faith
Mere Apologetics: How To Help Seekers And Skeptics Find Faith
by Alister E. Mcgrath
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.79

5.0 out of 5 stars Table d'hote of apologetics, 29 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In this book Alastair McGrath writes with his usual grace and aplomb. Reasons he provides to show that theism offers better explanations for phenomena in the natural world, including those found within ourselves, are well-articulated and convincing. He updates Lewis by addressing challenges to the Christian faith from post-modernism. I am pleased to learn of his involvement as director of The Centre for Christian Apologetics. This important aspect in the proclamation of the gospel has long been neglected by churches of every denomination. However, as increasing numbers of its students graduate their impact within and beyond churches may be incalculable. Nonetheless, I'm not sure if gracious, reasonable advocates for Christianity will be given space in the media to express a differing worldview from that of raucous atheists. Moders viewers and readers, it appears, prefer vulgarity to graciousness.


The Resurrection of the Son of God (Christian Origins and the Question of God)
The Resurrection of the Son of God (Christian Origins and the Question of God)
by N. T. Wright
Edition: Paperback
Price: £28.10

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Christian apologetics at its best, 24 July 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I'm only half way through this book but, regrettably, have had to lay it down temporarily to attend to more urgent business. As an evangelical lay preacher I found the breadth and depth of Tom Wright's assessment of the resurrection of Jesus to be deeply satisfying. His analysis of 1 Corinthians chapter 15, in particular, thrilled me. We need to hear more of this kind of material suitably presented for the laity from the pulpit.

I will get back to the book as soon as possible, then, hopefully, re-read it through without an extended break. The other books in Tom Wright's series I have yet to lay hands on. What a prospect is in store!


The Genesis Enigma
The Genesis Enigma
by Dr Andrew Parker
Edition: Hardcover

15 of 49 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars pseudo science, pseudo religion, 21 July 2009
This review is from: The Genesis Enigma (Hardcover)
After reading Christopher Hart's review of the book in Saturday's Daily Mail, I have no desire to buy it. From his description of its contents the author Andrew Parker appears anxious to please both parties to a long-running scientific/religious dispute, but ends up satisfying neither.

In common with atheistic scientists and recent creationists dominated by a western mind-set, he has no understanding of ancient Hebrew language and culture. For the opening chapters of Genesis were never meant by its author(s) to be a scientific treatise, nor was chapter 1 ever meant to be understood chronologically. If God had intended to impart infallible scientific knowledge by inspiration it would have come in the form of ultimate science, understood neither by the first readers of Genesis nor, most probably, by us.

Increasingly, conservative evangelical Old Testament scholars interpret this chapter topically. Their change of emphasis has resulted, not from fear of biblical/science conflict, but from a better understanding of Hebrew language and poetic form. The Genesis author(s) purpose was to show, by contrast with prevailing beliefs of idolatrous nations around Israel, that Israel's only God, Jehovah, made everything. In chapter 2, and in accordance with the literary style of the day, the Genesis author summarises the contents of chapter 1, then focuses attention on this man and woman made in God's image in order to develop the narrative in succeeding chapters. There is no conflict between chapters 1 and 2.

Because Andrew Parker understood none of these nuances his book is not worth reading.
Comment Comments (8) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 19, 2012 5:58 PM GMT


Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design
Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design
by Stephen C. Meyer
Edition: Hardcover

21 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent response to methodological naturalism, 14 July 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As a non-specialist I found this book a challenging read. I would have benefited from a glossary that defined some of the technical words used, e.g. topoisomerase. Perhaps Dr.Meyer might consider posting one on the book's website. Otherwise, except for a few very long sentences that stretched my concentration, the case he made for ID was comprehensive, well arranged and eloquently presented. By developing upon earlier works of Dembski, Behe, etc., Dr. Meyer has demonstrated how broad the ID platform had now become. I was particularly intrigued by the way in which Dembski's explanatory filter was applied to DNA.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 15, 2009 8:14 AM BST


The Design of Life: Discovering Signs of Intelligence in Biological Systems
The Design of Life: Discovering Signs of Intelligence in Biological Systems
by William A. Dembski
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £27.89

11 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Design or Dissimulation, 23 Jan. 2008
By claiming it took only 3 hours to read this book, N.A. Rajwade betrays the fact that he couldn't have read it. He confirms this suspicion by failing to address a single issue raised in it. What a plonker!

I have just finished reading the book, although I still have to study the general notes in the included CD. In the book proper the authors present a well-researched, persuasively written argument for intelligent design of biological organisms. Perhaps the nub of their argument lies in the treatment of Oparin's hypothesis, which proposes a purely materialistic approach to life's origin. Seven assumptions underlying this hypothesis were fairly presented, then devastatingly critiqued. The authors ask readers to follow Darwin's plea that "the facts and arguments on both sides of each question" be fully stated and balanced. Clearly, the ability of N.A. Rajwade and others like him/her to heed Darwin's advice is lacking.


Shattered Tablets: Why We Ignore the Ten Commandments at Our Peril
Shattered Tablets: Why We Ignore the Ten Commandments at Our Peril
by David Klinghoffer
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Missing the Point, 27 Sept. 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book by an orthodox Jew rings with sincerity. His kind disposition toward Bible believing Christians has much to commend it. No doubt Bible believing Christians and Jews need to work more closely together to confront an aggressively secular world. I found his interpretation of Hebrew words from a Jewish standpoint to be particularly interesting.

Having said this, my general impression of the book was one of disappointment. His main contention, that the two tablets of the ten commandments can be read side by side as well as one above the other, I found strained. Although I have only a nodding acquaintance with the various rabbinical authorities quoted, I had already arrived at the conclusion that classical rabbis, by and large, have not displayed the intellectual rigour of, say, the apostle Paul or Augustine or Aquinas. Nothing in the book has has changed my opinion on this.

I would take issue on Klinghoffer's identification of poverty with envy. Much wealth has been gained by a tiny minority of the population at the expense of the poor and underprivileged. Amos, Isaiah and Jeremiah and other Old Testament prophets thundered against it. Perhaps a more balanced assessment is needed here.


Page: 1