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A Georgian Village: Wimbledon 1724 - 1765 Part IV Of A History Of Wimbledon
A Georgian Village: Wimbledon 1724 - 1765 Part IV Of A History Of Wimbledon
by Richard Milward
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting and well written booklet, 17 July 2014
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This interesting 48-page booklet gives a fascinating overview of early Georgian Wimbledon Village. It is well illustrated and easy to read.

Half of this booklet concerns the village church, the large estates and the great houses that appeared in Wimbledon in this period. Although these great houses and their estates did dominate the village, the emphasis on them may also reflect the lack of documentary sources for the poorer people of Wimbledon. In particular, the church (vestry) documents from before 1740 have not survived. However, the author is able to give lists of the names of the local tradesmen and farmers as well as the principle landowners. In the 1740s there were seven publicans and six shop keepers. Of the local farmers, two are still remembered: George Haydon and Daniel Watney. One gave his name to Haydons Road; the other was the grandfather of the founder of Watney's Brewery.

This is the fourth part in the series on the History of Wimbledon. The first was a short booklet on Early and Medieval Wimbledon. This was followed by a larger booklet on Tudor Wimbledon and then a short book on Wimbledon around the time of the Civil War. This part reverses the trend of ever-increasing size in this historical series.

THE CHAPTERS are: Early Georgian Wimbledon; The People in the Village; Parish Government; The Relief of Poverty; The Parish Church; The Great Houses in the Village; The Great Houses round the Common; Wimbledon Park House; Sources and Suggestions for Further Reading.

THIS BOOKLET has 48 pages spread over 8 chapters including 6 maps and 11 black and white illustrations. One of the maps is a reproduction of the part of John Rocque's Map of Georgian London (1746) that covers Wimbledon. The other 5 are maps or plans of the village drawn by Paul Bowness. The village plans are notable for showing the positions of the houses in Wimbledon at the time, marked as either later demolished or as still standing today. The illustrations are mainly engravings or drawings of the big houses or paintings of the big landowners or buildings of interest such as the Charity School and St Mary's Church.

THE AUTHOR: Richard Milward lived in Wimbledon most of his life and was a History Master at Wimbledon College. He is the author of many publications about the history of Wimbledon and was president of the Wimbledon Society.

This booklet is part of the History of Wimbledon series:
Part 1 Early and Medieval Wimbledon
Part 2 Tudor Wimbledon
Part 3 Wimbledon in the Time of the Civil War, link2, link3, link4, link5
Part 4 A Georgian Village: Wimbledon 1724-1765
Part 5 Wimbledon during the reign of George III


Wimbledon in the time of the Civil War
Wimbledon in the time of the Civil War
by Milward Rj
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A good, short book, 16 July 2014
This is a short book on the history of Wimbledon before, during and after the Civil War. It can seem quite detailed in places and not detailed enough in other places. This is because it is a local history and has to follow the available documentary evidence. Overall, it is a fascinating view of a turbulent time from 1617 to 1724.

This book follows two shorter publications on Medieval and Tudor Wimbledon. It is larger because more documents survive. The sources are mostly these documents; there is little archaeology from this period. These documents are patchy but when available they can be quite detailed and this is reflected in the text

At the end of the book the author gives a short review of the period 1617 – 1724. At this time Wimbledon still meant Wimbledon Village. At the end of the period there were more cottages and especially large brick houses. The village was still basically the same with its manor house, church and two chief roads; the surrounding fields were the same, but the villagers had changed. The rich were richer and the poor were poorer and a new class of villager had emerged in the tradesmen who served the rich.

THE BOOK has 168 pages spread over 18 chapters and a few short appendices. Each chapter is followed by a short Notes section starting with the sources used in the chapter. These sources can be specific, giving the location of documents and their reference numbers; for example “Inventory of Goods at Wimbledon House, 1649, at the British Museum, Harleian MS 4898”. The book is illustrated with 22 hand-drawn maps and diagrams, which are crude but effective. There are also 7 black and white illustrations, mostly reproductions of engravings.

THE CHAPTERS: The chapters are collected into three parts: Part I Wimbledon Before the Civil War; Part II Wimbledon During the Civil War; Part III Wimbledon After the Civil War. Part I contains The Village; The Ordinary People; The Gentry; The Church and its Officials; The Manor under the Cecils; The Outside World. Part II contains Queen Henrietta and the Outbreak of War; John Halfhead and the Weekly Assessment; Sir Richard Wynn and the Defence of the Manor; General John Lambert, Lord of Wimbledon; Captain Robert Knox and a Voyage to Ceylon; Reverend William Syms, a Nonconformist Parson. Part III contains The New Tradesmen; The Poor; The Rich; Changes at St Mary’s; Bristol and Danby at the Manor House; A New Manor House.

THE AUTHOR: Richard Milward lived in Wimbledon most of his life and was a History Master at Wimbledon College. He is the author of many publications about the history of Wimbledon and was president of the Wimbledon Society.

This book is part of the History of Wimbledon series:
Part 1 Early and Medieval Wimbledon
Part 2 Tudor Wimbledon
Part 3 Wimbledon in the Time of the Civil War, link2, link3, link4, link5
Part 4 A Georgian Village: Wimbledon 1724-1765
Part 5 Wimbledon during the reign of George III


History Of Wimbledon Part 111 Wimbledon In The Time Of The Civil War,
History Of Wimbledon Part 111 Wimbledon In The Time Of The Civil War,
by R. J, Milward
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars A good, short book, 15 July 2014
This is a short book on the history of Wimbledon before, during and after the Civil War. It can seem quite detailed in places and not detailed enough in other places. This is because it is a local history and has to follow the available documentary evidence. Overall, it is a fascinating view of a turbulent time from 1617 to 1724.

This book follows two shorter publications on Medieval and Tudor Wimbledon. It is larger because more documents survive. The sources are mostly these documents; there is little archaeology from this period. These documents are patchy but when available they can be quite detailed and this is reflected in the text

At the end of the book the author gives a short review of the period 1617 - 1724. At this time Wimbledon still meant Wimbledon Village. At the end of the period there were more cottages and especially large brick houses. The village was still basically the same with its manor house, church and two chief roads; the surrounding fields were the same, but the villagers had changed. The rich were richer and the poor were poorer and a new class of villager had emerged in the tradesmen who served the rich.

THE BOOK has 168 pages spread over 18 chapters and a few short appendices. Each chapter is followed by a short Notes section starting with the sources used in the chapter. These sources can be specific, giving the location of documents and their reference numbers; for example "Inventory of Goods at Wimbledon House, 1649, at the British Museum, Harleian MS 4898". The book is illustrated with 22 hand-drawn maps and diagrams, which are crude but effective. There are also 7 black and white illustrations, mostly reproductions of engravings.

THE CHAPTERS: The chapters are collected into three parts: Part I Wimbledon Before the Civil War; Part II Wimbledon During the Civil War; Part III Wimbledon After the Civil War. Part I contains The Village; The Ordinary People; The Gentry; The Church and its Officials; The Manor under the Cecils; The Outside World. Part II contains Queen Henrietta and the Outbreak of War; John Halfhead and the Weekly Assessment; Sir Richard Wynn and the Defence of the Manor; General John Lambert, Lord of Wimbledon; Captain Robert Knox and a Voyage to Ceylon; Reverend William Syms, a Nonconformist Parson. Part III contains The New Tradesmen; The Poor; The Rich; Changes at St Mary's; Bristol and Danby at the Manor House; A New Manor House.

THE AUTHOR: Richard Milward lived in Wimbledon most of his life and was a History Master at Wimbledon College. He is the author of many publications about the history of Wimbledon and was president of the Wimbledon Society.

This book is part of the History of Wimbledon series:
Part 1 Early and Medieval Wimbledon
Part 2 Tudor Wimbledon
Part 3 Wimbledon in the Time of the Civil War, link2, link3, link4, link5
Part 4 A Georgian Village: Wimbledon 1724-1765
Part 5 Wimbledon during the reign of George III


Safe as Houses: Wimbledon at War 1939-1945
Safe as Houses: Wimbledon at War 1939-1945
by Norman Plastow
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.35

4.0 out of 5 stars Not so peaceful Wimbledon, 7 July 2014
This is an interesting and detailed booklet about the bombs that fell on the Wimbledon area during the Second World War. By definition it is a very specific publication, full of the names of roads hit at various times and of the address numbers of the houses affected in those roads. Thus it would be of interest mainly to readers who know the area.

Wimbledon did not suffer as much destruction as some inner London boroughs during the Second World War, but destruction there was. This 90 page booklet reconstructs the bombing history of Wimbledon. It is notable in having an Incident Map as a folded insert. This is a map of the area marked with the different categories of bombs dropped: high explosive bombs; unexploded bombs; oil and petrol bombs; incendiary bombs (clusters); misfired A.A. shells; crashed aircraft; V.I. flying bombs. There is also a short 2-page Index of Incidents by Road. There are also 15 illustrations, mostly half-page photographs of destruction caused by the bombing.

THE CHAPTERS: Introduction; Preparation; The First Raid; The Battle; The Weapons; The Blitz; The Shelters; Target Wimbledon; The End of the Blitz; The Drab Years; Hit and Run; The Flying Bombs.

Much of the text is a horrifying list of death and destruction, alleviated with acts of heroism or humour. Bombs fall, some houses are totally destroyed and many of the other houses in the street are badly damaged; several people die, more are badly injured and some have a lucky escape. The first bombs fell on Wimbledon on 16th August 1940. Many houses were damaged and a fire was started which killed seven people. There was a story of an old man who was found wandering among the ruins holding a lavatory chain. “All I did was pull it” he said “and the whole bloody house fell down”. The last bombing was by a V1 flying bomb, a doodle bug, on 28th August 1944. It demolished 73 to 79 Lambton Road and damaged all the other houses in this road and in the surrounding area. Two people died and twenty-one were taken to hospital.


HISTORY OF WIMBLEDON PART I (TO C.1540) EARLY WIMBLEDON
HISTORY OF WIMBLEDON PART I (TO C.1540) EARLY WIMBLEDON
by R. J. MILWARD
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A good booklet but has been superseded by a shorter version, 7 July 2014
This 57 page booklet was intended to be the first in a series on the history of Wimbledon. It covers the period from the earliest times up to The Reformation. It has 8 hand-drawn maps and overall is an enjoyable read. However, it was replaced by a completely re-written booklet in 1983.

CHAPTERS: I Wimbledon before the railway; II Wimbledon BC; III Romans and Saxons; IV Norman Wimbledon; V Wimbledon under the archbishops; VI Wimbledon after the Black Death; VII Wimbledon and the Reformation.

THE REPLACEMENT was Early and Medieval Wimbledon by the same author. In the Preface to the new version the author says that he has cut the length of the earlier version to almost half by removing all material that was not directly concerned with Wimbledon. He also added some new historical information and provided better maps. Thus this booklet is longer than its replacement, contains more history about the area surrounding Wimbledon and at a national level and has less professional maps

THE AUTHOR: Richard Milward lived in Wimbledon most of his life and was a History Master at Wimbledon College. He is the author of many publications about the history of Wimbledon and was president of the Wimbledon Society.


History of Wimbledon: Tudor Wimbledon Pt. 2
History of Wimbledon: Tudor Wimbledon Pt. 2
by R. J. Milward
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A detailed and substantial booklet, 7 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Tudor Wimbledon

This is a substantial booklet on the history of Wimbledon Village from the time of Henry VIII to the start of the first Stuart king, James I. It is very readable and would be of interest both to those who know modern Wimbledon and to amateur historians in general.

The sources are mostly written documents. To quote the author: "A village transformed into a London suburb in the second half of the nineteenth century is not the ideal place to find traces of the distant past". These documents are patchy but when available they can be quite detailed and this is reflected in the text. Some of this detail may be too much for a casual reader. In the Forward the author himself suggests that Chapter V, Wimbledon in 1585, can be ". . . ignored by ordinary readers who are uninterested in the technicalities of local history."

THE BOOKLET has 128 pages spread over 8 chapters. Each chapter is followed by a short Notes section starting with the sources used in the chapter. These sources are specific, giving the location of the documents and their reference numbers. It is illustrated with 5 hand-drawn maps, a family tree and a plan of Wimbledon House and its garden.

THE CHAPTERS: I Wimbledon in 1546; II William Cecil at the Rectory; III William Walter and the Puritans; IV John Baldwyn and his Neighbours; V Wimbledon in 1585; VI Farming in Elizabethan Wimbledon; VII Thomas Cecil and the new Manor House; VIII Royal Visitors; Appendix A - A Guide to the Original Sources; Appendix B - Remains of Tudor Wimbledon.

Wimbledon in the Time of the Civil War

This is a short book on the history of Wimbledon before, during and after the Civil War. It can seem quite detailed in places and not detailed enough in other places. This is because it is a local history and has to follow the available documentary evidence. Overall, it is a fascinating view of a turbulent time from 1617 to 1724.

This book follows two shorter publications on Medieval and Tudor Wimbledon. It is larger because more documents survive. The sources are mostly these documents; there is little archaeology from this period. These documents are patchy but when available they can be quite detailed and this is reflected in the text

At the end of the book the author gives a short review of the period 1617 - 1724. At this time Wimbledon still meant Wimbledon Village. At the end of the period there were more cottages and especially large brick houses. The village was still basically the same with its manor house, church and two chief roads; the surrounding fields were the same, but the villagers had changed. The rich were richer and the poor were poorer and a new class of villager had emerged in the tradesmen who served the rich.

THE BOOK has 168 pages spread over 18 chapters and a few short appendices. Each chapter is followed by a short Notes section starting with the sources used in the chapter. These sources can be specific, giving the location of documents and their reference numbers; for example "Inventory of Goods at Wimbledon House, 1649, at the British Museum, Harleian MS 4898". The book is illustrated with 22 hand-drawn maps and diagrams, which are crude but effective. There are also 7 black and white illustrations, mostly reproductions of engravings.

THE CHAPTERS: The chapters are collected into three parts: Part I Wimbledon Before the Civil War; Part II Wimbledon During the Civil War; Part III Wimbledon After the Civil War. Part I contains The Village; The Ordinary People; The Gentry; The Church and its Officials; The Manor under the Cecils; The Outside World. Part II contains Queen Henrietta and the Outbreak of War; John Halfhead and the Weekly Assessment; Sir Richard Wynn and the Defence of the Manor; General John Lambert, Lord of Wimbledon; Captain Robert Knox and a Voyage to Ceylon; Reverend William Syms, a Nonconformist Parson. Part III contains The New Tradesmen; The Poor; The Rich; Changes at St Mary's; Bristol and Danby at the Manor House; A New Manor House.

THE AUTHOR: Richard Milward lived in Wimbledon most of his life and was a History Master at Wimbledon College. He is the author of many publications about the history of Wimbledon and was president of the Wimbledon Society.

The History of Wimbledon series:
Part 1 Early and Medieval Wimbledon
Part 2 Tudor Wimbledon
Part 3 Wimbledon in the Time of the Civil War, link2, link3, link4, link5
Part 4 A Georgian Village: Wimbledon 1724-1765
Part 5 Wimbledon during the reign of George III


Early & medieval Wimbledon
Early & medieval Wimbledon
by R. J Milward
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Short but very good, 7 July 2014
This is a short booklet that makes good use of the information available about the history of Wimbledon up to the end of the reign of Henry VIII. It is strongly focused on Wimbledon itself, which in this period was Wimbledon Village. Its shortness reflects how little information there is available. A great deal of care has gone into the writing and the illustration of this booklet of 31 pages. The front cover is a detailed line drawing by Paul Bowness in the style of the marginalia found in medieval manuscripts. Four parts of this drawing are reproduced in the text as decoration. Paul Bowness also drew the map of medieval Wimbledon that starts the booklet.

There are few archaeological remains in Wimbledon and the documentary record does not really start until the early 13th century. Wimbledon Common provides a dry flat area for settlement. The surrounding land was uninviting to early settlers being either marshy or forested heavy clay too difficult to clear with stone tools. Later, in the Iron Age, there was a hill-fort on the Common. The remains of this hill-fort are now called Caesar's Camp, but it is earlier than the time of Caesar and has no connection with the Romans, who do not seem to have had any interest in the area.

The Saxons did find it of interest and lived there. The Vikings established a base across the river Thames at Fulham and must have raided. When the Normans came in 1066, Wimbledon belonged to the Church, but it does not appear in the Domesday Book. The land belonged to the Archbishop of Canterbury until the time of Henry VIII. Thomas Cromwell, Henry's minister, came from nearby Putney. He suggested to the then archbishop, Cranmer, that they swap certain lands. It was an unequal bargain to which the archbishop wisely agreed and thus Thomas Cromwell acquired lands in Wimbledon.

THE CHAPTERS: 1 Evidence for Early and Medieval Wimbledon; 2 Wimbledon BC; 3 Romans, Saxons and Normans; 4 Wimbledon in the Thirteenth Century; 5 Wimbledon Before and After the Black Death; 6 Wimbledon's Manor Court; 7 Wimbledon's Parish Church; 8 Wimbledon and Henry VIII.

THE AUTHOR: Richard Milward lived in Wimbledon most of his life and was a History Master at Wimbledon College. He is the author of many publications about the history of Wimbledon and was president of the Wimbledon Society.

This booklet is part of the History of Wimbledon series:
Part 1 Early and Medieval Wimbledon
Part 2 Tudor Wimbledon
Part 3 Wimbledon in the Time of the Civil War, link2, link3, link4, link5
Part 4 A Georgian Village: Wimbledon 1724-1765
Part 5 Wimbledon during the reign of George III


Wimbledon: A Pictorial History
Wimbledon: A Pictorial History
by Richard Milward
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.88

4.0 out of 5 stars Mostly old photographs, 7 July 2014
This is mostly a collection of old photographs of Wimbledon. Their main source is the Wimbledon Society Museum Collection. The oldest photograph, number 126, is of Wimbledon’s postman, taken about 1858, but the majority are from the turn of the twentieth century onwards. There are also reproductions of old engravings, pictures and maps. All of them are reproduced in black and white. Each picture is numbered but, strangely, the pages are not. Some pictures take a whole page but usually there are two pictures per page. Each has a description and the pictures are grouped into sections introduced with a page of text.

THE SECTIONS: Part I Historical Outlines contains pages 1-59. Its two largest sections are Georgian Village and Railway Suburb. Part II Aspects of Wimbledon contains pictures 60-182 and has sections: The Common; Churches; Schools; Shops; Transport; Local Government; Leisure; Hospitals & Health; Two World Wars; Wimbledon since 1945.

THE MAPS reproduced are: Wimbledon area 1819; Wimbledon in the 1740s; Wimbledon 1865; New Wimbledon 1877 (south of the Broadway); Worple Road area 1890; Wimbledon Park 1882; Cottenham Park 1893; Wimbledon 1740; Wimbledon 1890.

THE AUTHOR: Richard Milward lived in Wimbledon most of his life and was a History Master at Wimbledon College. He is the author of many publications about the history of Wimbledon and was president of the Wimbledon Society.


Ancient Mysteries - Lost Castles of England
Ancient Mysteries - Lost Castles of England
Offered by Global_Deals
Price: 0.89

4.0 out of 5 stars Historical Carpentry, 7 July 2014
My heart sank a little when this DVD began with a simple, deliberate American voiceover, but once I got used to the style I realised that this DVD also had substance. It is about the original wooden castles built by the Normans immediately after the conquest and for several centuries afterwards. Eventually these castles were either replaced by stone versions or abandoned - hence the description "lost castles" in the title. The very earliest would have been simple wooden enclosures for the cavalry horses of the invaders, but the invaders soon adopted the Motte and Bailey design. This was a fortified wooden building on top of an artificial high mound, the Motte, inside a larger enclosed area, the Bailey. This design can still be seen in the stone castle descendants of the original wooden castles. At the time these wooden buildings were not considered to be temporary structures; they were built to last and with careful maintenance they lasted for generations. Strength was given to the wooden walls by building them in pairs and packing the space between them with earth and stones. Roofs were tiled rather than thatched to guard against fire and defensive walls were plastered for protection and to make them look more like stone from a distance.

TALKING HEADS: The talking heads are: Philip Barker, author of Timber Castles, and the original excavator of Hen Domen, an abandoned wooden castle on the Welsh border; John Kenyon, author of Medieval Fortifications; Brian Davison, a medieval historian and author; Peter Scholefield, an historical artist and architect.

STYLE: This is a DVD of a TV programme for the History Channel; the abrupt cuts where the original adverts would have been can seem strange. The American perspective can also seem odd, for example references to the British Empire and "Shropshire County", but the contents of the DVD and the contributors are British and it is only the voiceover style that is American. The "period" music is also quite jolly. The DVD is constructed with the voiceover, sometimes cutting to expert opinions from several talking heads, helicopter filming of various castles and their landscape settings, scans of pictures and models reconstructing the wooden castles and other scans such as the Bayeux Tapestry, the Domesday Book, illuminations from medieval manuscripts etc. The DVD is divided into five parts: Act 1 Hen Domen - The Old Mound; Act 2 1066; Act 3 Domesday; Act 4 Every Man's Castle; Act 5 Timber to Stone. Running time is 45 minutes.


Into The Woods: How Stories Work and Why We Tell Them
Into The Woods: How Stories Work and Why We Tell Them
by John Yorke
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Once upon a time in a wood near you, 23 Jun 2014
This is a book about stories and how they are constructed. Specifically, it is about what makes a good dramatic story for film and TV programmes. This is not a manual on how to write screenplays. If you are interested in how stories work or how to write them, this book will be of interest. I liked it even though it was not quite what I was looking for. This book is easy to read but to understand it will require some concentration. However, if you are not totally committed to the idea of the story it could also become quite boring and repetitive.

INTO THE WOODS: The title "Into the Woods" refers to the classic story template. A young man lives in a safe and pleasant home but undergoes a crisis. This propels him into the dark and dangerous wood. There he meets his enemy or a monster or a monstrous aspect of himself. He eventually resolves the crisis and leaves the wood a changed and better person. John Yorke considers stories to be based on a three-act structure but this is commonly expanded to five acts. He uses themes from this "Into the Woods " story to name the five sections used to group the chapters of his book. "Act I Home " introduces the 3-act and 5-act structures, the importance of change in a story and the need for a midpoint; "Act II Woodland, Day" introduces the idea of fractal patterns within the acts, the inciting incident and the scenes within the acts and their turning points; "Act III The Forest" is about giving the audience the information but not being explicit about the story-line, making the audience create their own interpretation; "Act IV The Road Back, Night" is about characterisation; "Act V Home Again, Changed" starts with discussions about actual formats: TV programmes, film and TV serials. The last chapter is titled "Why?" and asks why do stories have structure and why do we need to tell stories?

EXAMPLES: The author has been head of Channel 4 Drama and Controller of BBC Drama Productions, amongst other things. Thus many of the examples are from UK TV, as well as American films and TV programmes, folk tales, Macbeth, Homer etc. For example, having discussed the film Pulp Fiction over two pages, he goes on to mention in the following page, briefly, Orpheus and Euydice, Buster Keaton in the General and Jack and the Beanstalk.

ANTHROPOLOGY: I bought this book on impulse and immediately had some regrets, but it proved to be interesting and it gives useful references. I wanted something on stories and how humans construct their reality out of them; on how history becomes stories and stories become myths. This is not the central preoccupation of this book but in explaining what makes a good story it touches on these topics. Thus Jung is mentioned in passing. The influence of the work of the anthropologist Joseph Campbell on George Lucas and Star Wars is discussed as is Christopher Volger's distillation of Joseph Campbell's work for the screenwriting industry. I was taken by a sentence on page 29: "Storytelling, then, can be seen as a codification of the method by which we learn - expressed in a three-act shape".

THE BOOK has 230 pages plus Appendices (22 pages) giving the structure of five examples (Raiders of the Lost Ark, Hamlet, Being John Malkovich, My Zinc Bed, The Godfather), extensive Notes (37 pages), a Bibliography (4 pages), Acknowledgements (3 pages) and an Index. I agree with several other reviewers about the cover of the paperback. It is matt-black and coated with a clear plastic that is quite tactile. This looks good when new, but degrades rapidly with the coating peeling at the edges. If you like your books to be pristine, I suggest that you wrap it in a clear plastic cover, library-style, before you start to read.

OTHER BOOKS: John Yorke mentions the following in the Acknowledgements section as having laid down a path for him by their analysis of story structures: Christopher Booker The Seven Basic Plots, Christopher Vogler A Practical Guide to The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1985), David Lodge The Art of Fiction (1992), David Mamet Three Uses of the Knife (1998), Epes Winthrop Sargent The Technique of the Photoplay(1916), Joseph Campbell The Hero with A Thousand Faces (1949), Lajos Egri How to Write a Play (1942), Laurie Hutzler, Northrop Frye, Robert McKee Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting (1999), Syd Field, Vladmir Propp "Morphology of the Folk Tale" (1928), Wayne C. Booth The Rhetoric of Fiction (1961), William Archer Play-Making - A Manual of Craftsmanship (1912) and William Indick Psychology for Screenwriters (2004).


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