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Terroni. Tutto quello che è stato fatto perché gli italiani del Sud diventassero «meridionali»
Terroni. Tutto quello che è stato fatto perché gli italiani del Sud diventassero «meridionali»
by Pino Aprile
Edition: Perfect Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, a great source of the missing pieces for a puzzle., 25 Dec 2012
A very good book that is very helpful to understand the reasonns, process and consequeances of italy's birth in the 1860s. It brings light to a subject that is passed lightly by many.
It helps to understand why other powers of Europe supported and sponsored it, why the South of the Penninsula went from being wealthy to poor, and the North from irrelevant fo centuries in the European context to the leading role.
And of course, why and how Italy had the biggest diaspora of modern history for the coming century.
A recommended book for any of those interested in the foundations of Italy and he European trascending processes of the XIX cenury.


Universal Wirth Tarot/Tarot Universal de Wirth [With Instructions]
Universal Wirth Tarot/Tarot Universal de Wirth [With Instructions]
by Oswald Wirth
Edition: Cards
Price: £16.57

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A failed attempt to update a classic deck, 19 Oct 2012
For whatever reason the Lo scarabeo editors got a licence to re-arrange the old Oswald Wirth Tarot Deck.
A shame since it was a perfect transition between the Marseilles and the Rider Waite.
This revised version, released during the 2000s ( many decades after Mr Wirth's death) was "modernized" in a very childish, new age way, making cards like the Fool, The Hermit and the Magician seem like from a post-1990s-manga type of illustration.
The element correspondences for the minor arcana seem acceptable, associating the fire with the seasons and wheat, the pentacles with earth and the planets. The air element with wind and clouds. The usage of butterflies with the Cups is cute but I'm not sure how justifiable it is in symbolical terms. The worst part is the use of animal heads in many cards where other tarots don't ( even a dog head was thrown in there). It seems it was more for aesthetic reasons than grounded on symbolic meaning.
The perspective and dimensions of the drawings are specially obnoxious in the court cards, where they are mostly out of proportion regarding the space and size. In the King of Pentacles half of the pentacle he holds doesn't appear. ( much like a wrongly centered photograph).
I consider it disrespectful of the classic Wirth Tarot which sadly seems out of print and these opportunists, so-called artists ( amateur at best regarding the drawings) took advatage of this abusing the old name and only adding the word Universal. I blame whomever sold the rights or permitted this. Fortunately it's not happening with many old Tarot decks ( perhaps it is that most old Tarots have people/editors protecting the rights of the great original decks, but in the case of this one has been forgotten or in the hands of people who don't care?)

4 out of 10


Universal Wirth Tarot: 78 card tarot deck full colour
Universal Wirth Tarot: 78 card tarot deck full colour
by Giordano Berti
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.05

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A failed atempt to update a classic cult deck, 19 Oct 2012
For whatever reason the Lo scarabeo editors got a licence to re-arrange the old Oswald Wirth Tarot Deck.
A shame since it was a perfect transition between the Marseilles and the Rider Waite.
This revised version, released during the 2000s ( many decades after Mr Wirth's death) was "modernized" in a very childish, new age way, making cards like the Fool, The Hermit and the Magician seem like from a post-1990s-manga type of illustration.
The element correspondences for the minor arcana seem acceptable, associating the fire with the seasons and wheat, the pentacles with earth and the planets. The air element with wind and clouds. The usage of butterflies with the Cups is cute but I'm not sure how justifiable it is in symbolical terms. The worst part is the use of animal heads in many cards where other tarots don't ( even a dog head was thrown in there). It seems it was more for aesthetic reasons than grounded on symbolic meaning.
The perspective and dimensions of the drawings are specially obnoxious in the court cards, where they are mostly out of proportion regarding the space and size. In the King of Pentacles half of the pentacle he holds doesn't appear. ( much like a wrongly centered photograph).
I consider it disrespectful of the classic Wirth Tarot which sadly seems out of print and these opportunists, so-called artists ( amateur at best regarding the drawings) took advatage of this abusing the old name and only adding the word Universal. I blame whomever sold the rights or permitted this. Fortunately it's not happening with many old Tarot decks ( perhaps it is that most old Tarots have people/editors protecting the rights of the great original decks, but in the case of this one has been forgotten or in the hands of people who don't care?)

4 out of 10


Ayurveda: A Comprehensive Guide to Traditional Indian Medicine for the West
Ayurveda: A Comprehensive Guide to Traditional Indian Medicine for the West
by Frank John Ninivaggi
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £27.34

3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not as much it could have been, 19 Mar 2011
The first two thirds of this book are a great introduction to the western mind to the world of Ayurveda, its history, goals as well as he explanation of its basics: What the doshas are, prakuti or physical types; Lifestyles, diets and cures recommended to maintain balance and heal illnesses.
The problem comes with the last 100-120 pages. Lots of redundancy, repetitions several times over of the same information, bad writing style ( awkward and tiresome to read phrasing, lists composed mostly of synonyms, sometimes the same herbs listen twice in the same list ), a few contradictions in what is good and harmful for vata/kapha. It is as if some parts had been written by another person, maybe this author used several sources without polishing it first?
Several times he compromises the quality of the work by trying to be too politically correct in regards of sexuality (by avoiding it and suggesting very moralistic and ethnocentric suggestions to parents) and the use of adjectives unacceptable for a scientific such and "reasonable amounts of", "appropriate" mean. Whatever they mean, they are too subjective to take this book as a guide to design a diet and apply it to one's life. The last few chapters are not even dedicated to the West but only to the US society. It is as if the person who wrote the first 8 chapters was thinking about the west in general and the one who wrote the last 4 was only thinking about the US.
The ideas on psychology scattered over the last pages are pretty useful.
I think that in general, this book is a decent introduction to understand this path as a whole but if one wants to take this further and needs a thorough guide, it's better to search for a more detailed book less waffle.
Probably, a book written wholly by people from India, not Western doctors who compromise the quality of the work to serve certain interests and who after all are trapped in the same paradigm as us. I was disappointed to learn that Ninivaggi is an Italian-American, not a Hindu practitioner. I was misguided by the last name, my fault.


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