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Acton "I Am Acton" (Ireland)

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Rigid Car Seat Belt Extender - Adds 28cm, E4 Safety Certified, Type A (21mm wide metal tongue) - Stands Upright!
Rigid Car Seat Belt Extender - Adds 28cm, E4 Safety Certified, Type A (21mm wide metal tongue) - Stands Upright!
Offered by Seat Belt Extender Pros
Price: 12.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Works perfectly, 31 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Wish I had bought this a couple of years ago. Takes all the hassle from securing the kids in their seats. Works perfectly and matches the product description perfectly. Just the right length too.


Creole Belle (Dave Robicheaux 19)
Creole Belle (Dave Robicheaux 19)
by James Lee Burke
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.59

5.0 out of 5 stars The best so far, 31 Mar 2014
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This is James Lee Burke's finest book so far. It follows almost immediately from the events in 'The Glass Rainbow' but you don't need to have read Rainbow first (although all fans will have of course). Robicheaux and Purcell are back, and in some ways this is more of a Clete Purcel book than a book about Streak. Once more they are pitted against a rich corrupt family, but this time Dave is thinking and acting more like Clete, on full bore with the safety off. I really didn't want the book to end. It is very topical too as its main plot revolves around the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the later oil spill. James Burke has reached a new peek of writing with this book.


House of Small Shadows
House of Small Shadows
by Adam L. G. Nevill
Edition: Paperback
Price: 4.80

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars House of long yawns, 31 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: House of Small Shadows (Paperback)
This book was ok, but was so drawn out that by the end I didn't care what happened. A couple of hundred pages seemed to be spent doing nothing in particular. Maybe I'm being cruel but there are only so many times I can read sequences where walking down a corridor at night has cosmic significance. The main character was so useless and had less life in her than a rag doll. Pardon the pun.


Meetings with Morrissey
Meetings with Morrissey
by Len Brown
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.32

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Famous When Dead, 31 Dec 2013
I really enjoyed this book much more than Moz's recent autobiography. Len's account of Morrissey from Smiths to Ringleader is very warm and intimate and makes you fell like you were there during their conversations. The obvious friendship between the two men is the glamorous glue that holds the book together. I actually learned some new information while reading this book, which is a rare thing.
There are a couple of pesky insects in the ointment however:
1. Len spends far too much time detailing the Oscar Wilde connection and at one point in the final chapter almost seems to infer that Moz may be a reincarnated Wilde; comparing timelines and commen events in their lives. Note: He doesn't come out and say it so perhaps I am reading too much into it.
2. I was expecting more actual interviews, more transcribed conversations. Instead there was a fair amount of interviews padded out by album reviews etc. Still it was a good read and I especially liked the interviews with Stephen Street.

I didn't mind Len's dragging his own life into the story as it made the book more human. Also, Len's intelligent approach and research helped greatly in explaining Morrissey's fascination with books, film, plays and music and how they have influenced him (as detailed in the appendix on 'Morrissey's People'). Morrissey's deep interest in death and suicide is not news to the serious fan but on a few occasions in the book he mentions cases where people have killed themselves after their mother died (e.g. Jimmy Clitheroe). Let's hope this is not an idea floating around the back of Moz's mind.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 1, 2014 3:43 PM GMT


Nenuco My Little Twins
Nenuco My Little Twins
Price: 20.98

5.0 out of 5 stars Great dolls, 31 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Nenuco My Little Twins (Toy)
These are great dolls; the accessories are good and the dolls (especially the pink girl) smell very nice. This was a very popular purchase in my house. The doll's bodies are soft and not heavy and are ideal for a child who likes to carry them around the house.


Autobiography
Autobiography
by Morrissey
Edition: Paperback
Price: 3.85

24 of 31 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The unbearable heaviness of being Morrissey, 30 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Autobiography (Paperback)
First off I want to say that the autobiography is very well written and makes you want to keep on reading it. It starts off very well but to me it loses itself from the creation of The Smiths onwards.
I really wanted to like this book, and there is nothing wrong with whats in it, but what is not in it is even more important and casts a cold shadow on what could have been.
Examples (spoiler alerts below):
1. Morrissey barely takes a paragraph to describe the day Marr called to his house, AND YET he spends at least 50 pages minutely detailing and repeating himself ad nauseum on the Joyce court case.
2. Morrissey mentions Jake's arrival in his life but nothing about his departure, or really what it meant to him and his music. I couldn't even follow if his arrival impacted the 'Vauxhall' album or came afterwards.
3. Morrisey mentions Gelato's appearance but nothing about his departure.
4. The sentence where Moz mentions comtemplating having a baby with a woman is just that: a sentence. I couldn't decide if he was joking or not. She doesn't get a mention again until the acknowledgements on final page.
5. There is an overall negative and self-pitying tone throughout the book. It was funny at the start but annoying after 400 pages. I know I'll be atatcked for mentioning this, and I own and regularly listen to all of the Moz/Smiths albums and cds, but really it gets tiresome when a multimillionaore keeps carping about how tough their life is. I'm sorry but there it is.
6. Too much name checking of famous people. Also it shows a flip flop attitude from Moz where he now seems to think Elton John is ok when previously calling for his head on a plate.
7. Very negative towards Alain Whyte, while being gushingly positive about Jesse and other band members. I guess the quality of the musical output of the collaboration doesn't count for much.
8. The Smiths era was glossed over with tales about some US concerts. Nothing new was written about the songwriting process, how they put the albums together, what a day in the studio was like, what they liked to do together outside the studio (nothing?).
9. I didn't see a mention of what his favourite songs are, or his most disliked songs.
10. Far too much time talking about other songs and artists he likes. That's all very nice but tell us more about The Smiths, the split, and his subsequent stellar career as a solo artist. Most of his albums are glossed over like a montage in a cheap film.
11. The first part of the book was interesting and featured good never before seen photos (at least not seen by me),but then degenerates into self pitying rambling storytelling without plot or substance, bolstered by crappy photos of album covers that we already own.
12. No mention of the absolute crap 'true to you' website or the excellent Morrissey-solo site. The MozSolo site was a lifeline to people especially during the wilderness years, and I check it at least once per day since it sprang to life in the 90's. It's creator has received a lifetime concert ban from Moz, but of course none of this is mentioned in the book.
13. 55 pages about Judge John Weeks made me feel sick, and served only to make him even more well known. Weeks probably loves this book.
14. My wife advised me to throw the book into the fire after the first 150 pages but I stuck through to the end, but there was only so many melodramatic pages about US concerts that I could take. 'To be finished would be a relief'.

I could go on. I enjoyed the book (especially the first 100 pages or so) but feel The Smiths barely got a mention, and the solo years became a blur punctuated by accounts of US concerts and audience fanaticism. I really think this was a missed opportunity, unbalanced, and ultimately uninforming. If you really want to know more about Morrissey stick to his music. Morrissey writes very well on his autobiography, but I believe he has taken a self-indulgent attitude and beautifully describes events and milestones that are at best a sub-plot to the main story, which to me remains untold. I did like the way he explained his tendency towards depression and how it has defined his life in many ways, but more information onall of his amazing experiences from The Smiths to Refusal would have been welcome.

A reviewer mentioned that the book reads like a poem. If so then it is 'Paradise Lost', or more aptly 'Paradise Never Gained'.


25 Live [Blu-ray] [2013] [Region Free]
25 Live [Blu-ray] [2013] [Region Free]
Dvd ~ Morrissey
Price: 15.12

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The stars smile shyly down, 26 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This concert works really well because it is an intimate gig, undiluted by casual passerbys or oversized venue. Morrissey's voice, form, and mood are in pristine condition as he powerhouses through a diverse and eclectic set list that rummages through tracks from Arsenal, Meat, Quarry, Drag, Malady Just, Hate, Vauxhall, Tormentors, among others. He presents the old familiars in a new light, slight changes making some old songs sound newly born. His cover of 'to give is the reason I live' is a high point, but really the whole concert is gripping from start to finish.
The only low points are the ghouls who pour out their inanities when Moz presents them with a mike. Julia sounds vacant. The running time is the usual just under 90 mins, so it is a pity Moz didn't staple on three or four more songs at the end to round out. The bonus features are ok but only a revelation to those bereft of the Internet. The Russell Bland cling-on isn't a bonus. These low points are blasted into insignificance by the sheer quality of the main feature.
The visual quality is spot on although I do wish the director had directed the camera operators to focus more on Morrissey. After all it is him we want to see. Everything and everyone else is background scenery.
This concert reminded me of Moz at Glasgow Barrowlands during his 'wilderness' years, where he pulled out all the stops to give us a truly memorable night. I think he sings best at smaller venues like Barrowlands and Hollywood High.
I loved this blu ray. It arrived in the same package as his autobiography came in, and neither disappoint. P.s. keep an ear open for 'asleep' which is not mentioned in the track listing.


A Dark Matter
A Dark Matter
by Peter Straub
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.99

2.0 out of 5 stars A dark that doesn't matter, 12 July 2013
This review is from: A Dark Matter (Paperback)
I'm a huge fan of Peter Straub and love many of his novels. However, 'a dark matter', despite the great title, is very boring and hard to read and not an enjoyable experience. It is hard to believe this was written by the genius that gave us 'Ghost Story' and 'Shadowland' and 'Koko' and 'The Throat'. The latter part of the book was incomprehensible to me. I read it when it came out on hardback and will try to read it again someday, but it won't be easy. I think Straub is overthinking his work and his craft and his art. He needs to try having some fun with his novels, like he used to years ago prior to 'Hellfire Club'. I can't imagine Straub attracting any new fans with a book like this.


The Defenestration Of St Martin
The Defenestration Of St Martin
Price: 6.47

5.0 out of 5 stars Close the windows, 16 Feb 2013
Close the windows and turn it up. Tighten your headphones and settle in for the best album of 2012. From the first note of the first song 'three points on a compass' it becomes obvious that we're in for a deeply personal and moving album. The sparse arrangements of each song lets them breathe; Rossiter has burned out the dense woods and his minimalist approach of voice and piano are like solitary trees reaching for the sky. It is difficult to convey just how great this album really is. My favourites are 'three points', 'I want to chose when I sleep alone', 'drop anchor', and 'where there are pixels' but all of the songs are strong. I would love to see him tour Ireland with this record. If not I would make do with a concert DVD. In the meantime utube will have to suffice. Other artists should listen to 'defenestration' to see how real music is made.


Ray Bradbury Stories Volume 2: v. 2
Ray Bradbury Stories Volume 2: v. 2
by Ray Bradbury
Edition: Paperback
Price: 16.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Something wonderful this way comes, 30 Jan 2013
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This is the 2nd volume from Ray Bradbury in a two part collection of some of his best short stories. It features 100 stories ranging from some of the Martian Cnronicles to lesser known stories set in Ireland and Mexico. Every story is a little gem. After reading this I'll be looking to get Volume 1, which I hear is even better than Volume 2.
The beauty of this volume is that the short stories are the perfect lenght to allow the reader to go through one or two a day, regardless of how busy you are.
Vintage imagination from a master storyteller.


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