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A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament: 39 (Subsidia Biblica)
A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament: 39 (Subsidia Biblica)
by Max Zerwick
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 58.60

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Verse by Verse Grammar, 21 May 2013
I've been reading New Testament Greek for some time now and I've found this book useful. In fact I use it most days. If I am not sure of some grammar then this book usually answers my query quickly and easily, since it is arranged verse by verse. I also use Kubo's Reader's Greek-English Lexicon to quickly memorise rarer words before reading a passage. This is also arranged verse by verse. I like to work this way, but some may prefer modern computer based tools. If you are a serious student of NT Greek then I recommend this book. If, like me, you aim to teach yourself NT Greek, then you will need to work through a textbook such as Jeremy Duff's 'The Elements of NT Greek' first.


BIBLICAL HEBREW LAMINATED SHEET (Zondervan Get an A! Study Guides)
BIBLICAL HEBREW LAMINATED SHEET (Zondervan Get an A! Study Guides)
by PRATICO
Edition: Pamphlet
Price: 5.53

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A useful aid to study, 30 Sep 2012
I recently completed working through Biblical Hebrew for beginners by Dan Cohn-Sherbok (recommended) and am now reading a couple of verses from the Hebrew Bible every day, with the aid of a verse by verse analytical key. I've found this summary sheet by Pratico and Van Pelt to be a useful aid to study. I keep it close at hand to remind myself of things and to re-enforce what I am learning. The authors manage to fit an impressive amount of key reference information into just 4 pages. I've found this product to be more useful than the New Testament Greek equivalent. It's worth being aware that the authors do not use the modern pronunciation of Hebrew (which I have decided to use). Overall, I'm glad I purchased this product and think it is well worth the money.


Biblical Hebrew for Beginners
Biblical Hebrew for Beginners
by Dan Cohn-Sherbok
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.89

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A super little book, 30 Sep 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I worked through this book recently and I think this is a super little book. I have recently learned to read New Testament Greek but wondered whether I would be up to reading Biblical Hebrew and so wanted to start with something that is straightforward and not intimidating. This book was exactly the right thing for me. In just 84 pages it covers all the basics of Hebrew grammar and using a Hebrew dictionary. This is then followed by plenty of practice and guidance at reading selected verses form the Hebrew Bible. I found the book to be extremely encouraging and I learned a lot. I'm now ready to move on to a more advanced book with confidence. The book uses the modern way of pronouncing Hebrew which seems sensible to learn to me, since nobody is certain how it used to be pronounced in ancient times anyway. I now read a couple of verses from the Hebrew Bible everyday, using a verse by verse analytical key, to build up my knowledge. It's most rewarding. I've also found the Biblical Hebrew summary sheet by Pratico and Van Pelt to be a useful reference aid as well (though it does use a different pronunciation). I really liked the way Dan Cohn-Sherbok suggested for writing the Hebrew consonants by hand. My only minor criticism was that I sometimes wished that the Hebrew text in this book was a bit larger. This book is a great place to start on the journey of learning Biblical Hebrew and I highly recommend it.


The Myth of Junk DNA
The Myth of Junk DNA
by Jonathan Wells
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.83

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The MYTH of the Myth of Junk DNA, 3 Sep 2012
This review is from: The Myth of Junk DNA (Paperback)
Most of this book is a literature survey of other people's work in the field of genetics. The author has reviewed work that fits the idea that that non-functional genes do have wider functionality within a genome. It's the kind of material that would normally go in an annex of a book, but in the case of this book there wouldn't be a lot left over if the author did this!

I was already aware that leading Geneticists have been saying for several years that genetics is much more complicated than they originally thought. I was curious to read that genetic material that does not function directly as genes, does or may have a wider function within the genome. There were a number of issues, however, that bothered me about this book:

The criticism of Jerry A Coyne's book 'Why Evolution is True'(published 2009) was unfair. Wells criticises the fact that Coyne uses a theological argument in a science book (page 112). But Coyne is addressing people who don't believe in evolution and this includes many who don't because of their religious beliefs. So the comments are appropriate.

Wells also states that "scientists have not observed even the first step in macroevolution" (page 12). But Denis Alexander in his book 'Creation or Evolution: Do we have to choose?'(published 2008) gives several examples of evidence that this has happened recently (in Chapter 5).

This book seems to have a hidden agenda of rubbishing the theory of evolution. Yet evolution gives a very simple explanation of why there many non-functional genes and retroviruses in genomes. No better explanation was given in this book. I believe God made the Universe and everything in it, but as to the "how" I'm open-minded. I can't recommend this book.


The Elements of New Testament Greek
The Elements of New Testament Greek
by David Wenham
Edition: Paperback
Price: 18.89

5.0 out of 5 stars A superb book from which to teach yourself New Testament Greek, 16 Aug 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I can't recommend this book too highly. Jeremy Duff has produced a brilliant textbook. The book is extremely clear, concise and well laid out. Key learning points are emphasised, the grammar tables are helpful, and vocabulary lists are well organised - with useful mnemonics given at the bottom. After working my way through this book I felt confident to start reading the New Testament in Greek - with a dictionary at hand. I had learned all the key grammar and gained a working vocabulary of 600 words in just a few months.

I wish you well in your studies of New Testament Greek.


Learn New Testament Greek, with Audio CD-Rom
Learn New Testament Greek, with Audio CD-Rom
by John H. Dobson
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A different approach to learning New Testament Greek, 16 Aug 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have been teaching myself New Testament Greek for a year now and this was the first book I purchased. John Dobson offers some very helpful advice and initially I found the book extremely encouraging. The fact that it comes with an audio CD was initially helpful and makes this book very good value. He does not follow the normal more systematic approach to learning a language but his approach is more inductive. I would rate this as an excellent book but have not given it 5 stars because initially I got lost after about 17 chapters. I would have preferred there to be summary lists of vocabulary at the end of each chapter so that I could check that I knew the words so far covered. The index of words at the end of the book refers back into the book rather than giving a brief definition, and this makes it time consuming to look up words. Rather than give up after 17 chapters, I purchased The Elements of New Testament Greek by Jeremy Duff. I successfully worked my way through this book to the end and highly recommend it. Duff's systematic approach suited my learning style better. I then came back to John Dobson's book and worked my way the whole way through it. This time I thoroughly enjoyed it and learned a lot.

I summary, I highly recommend this book but be aware that it may not suit your learning style, at least initially. This means that you may need to get another more traditional book to supplement it.


Biblical Greek (Zondervan Get an A! Study Guides)
Biblical Greek (Zondervan Get an A! Study Guides)
by William D. Mounce
Edition: Pamphlet
Price: 4.50

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Initially useful summary sheet, 14 Aug 2012
I'm teaching myself New Testament Greek and initially found this 4 page summary sheet to be a useful guide to the scope of what I would need to learn. I have now worked my way through a couple of textbooks: The Elements of New Testament Greek by Jeremy Duff and Learn New Testament Greek by John Dobson (both excellent books). If I need to look grammar up when reading the New Testament in Greek then I tend to use Jeremy Duff's book which has a 20 page summary of grammar and other useful reference material. 4 pages is simply not enough information. However, I certainly think I have got my money's worth from this product. One small thing which was unhelpful initially was that the case of nouns and adjectives is given in a different order to the above 2 textbooks (nom, gen, dat, acc rather than nom, acc, gen, dat).


The Story of Christian Theology: Twenty Centuries of Tradition and Reform
The Story of Christian Theology: Twenty Centuries of Tradition and Reform
by Roger E. Olson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 23.04

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent introduction to historical theology, 20 Dec 2011
This book gives an excellent overview of the history of the development of Christian theology. The book is quite long at 652 pages but it feels like this is needed to do justice to what is covered. I am currently studying theology and wanted to read something that would give me a good overview of historical theology that would not be superficial. This book was perfect for this and I highly recommend it to students at undergraduate level as well as to other readers who wish to extend their knowledge of how theological ideas have developed over time. I found it to be both interesting and enjoyable to read and it has given me a deeper appreciation of the significance of different theologians and how ideas fit together. Well worth reading.


Christian Thought: A Historical Introduction
Christian Thought: A Historical Introduction
by Chad Meister
Edition: Paperback
Price: 25.19

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Introduction to historical theology, 5 Nov 2011
I thought that this was an excellent introduction to historical theology. It is a textbook, but nevertheless extremely readable. In fact, once I started reading it I found it hard to put down and read it cover to cover in less than two weeks. What is really appreciated about this book is that it has been written by two theologians who are also philosophers, so they were able to clearly explain how theological ideas were linked to wider philosophical ideas within history. This helped me to understand the development of Christian ideas in their historical context. The other thing that I liked about this book is that it was very memorable; the main points of each chapter are both introduced and the summarised in just a few bullet points and once the main text has been read these key points are very clear. The authors have done a fantastic job of explaining a lot of complexity in just 540 pages. The book brings theology alive and I strongly recommend it. I have read whole books on systematic theology before but found this book illuminating and feel inspired to read more...


Seven Days That Divide the World
Seven Days That Divide the World
by Lennox John
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 10.99

28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A valuable contribution to the debate, 3 Oct 2011
This book focuses on the creation account given in the early part of the book of Genesis and seeks to interpret it treating the text as authoritative scripture. Professor John Lennox makes the case for allowing scientific knowledge to influence this, where different interpretations are possible. To illustrate this he spends a couple of chapters covering the historic case of how opinion changed to accept that the earth is not fixed in space and that this is consistent with scripture even though many people initially thought not. He then goes on to explain different models of how Genesis has been interpreted and to argue which view fits both science and the biblical text the best. He argues for old earth creationism with progressive literal 24 hour creation days separated by long periods in between. On these days he sees God as providing information and energy to get life started and cause major changes followed by periods of micro-evolution with human beings created as an act of special creation. His position therefore seems to be one of 'intelligent design.' He then goes on to give the theological message of Genesis 1. The main part of the book is then followed by 5 annexes covering some issues in more detail. The book is short and concise at 192 pages (smaller pages then normal) including the annexes and is easy to read and clear. In my opinion he certainly says a lot of wise and insightful things and I think most people would learn something from reading his book. However, I wasn't convinced by some of his arguments. One of the key problems with his interpretation is Origen's observation that the Sun was created/made on day 4. This is a problem for 'days' 1 to 3. As Henri Blocher points out in his book 'In the beginning' (p45-46) 'made' should not be changed into revealed just to fit an interpretive scheme when the Hebrew of Genesis has a perfectly good word for appear. Also, God commands the land to produce all the different types of plants and animals (1:11-12, 24). God empowers the land to do all this and this fits well with the modern theory of evolution (See John Hartley, 'New International Biblical Commentary - Genesis', p57). So the Genesis text seems to be consistent with macro as well as micro evolution by unthinking material process. Perhaps God had already supplied the 'information' required? Lennox does not explain how his model accommodates the several mass extinctions throughout the history of life on earth or the fact that most species are extinct. In stating a case for a special creation of human beings he does not explain what causes humans to have fossilized genes or why retroviruses are inserted at specific places in the human genome which are at the same place as lower life forms. Perhaps this is too much to expect in a short book like this. For those who wish to read more widely on this subject I recommend Denis Alexander's 'Creation or Evolution - do we have to choose' and Henri Blocher's book 'In the Beginning' (first 2 Chapters) both of which I learned a lot from. In summary, Professor Lennox's book is well worth reading but I'd recommend reading some other books on this subject as well and then critically reflecting on what you have read.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 12, 2011 6:54 PM BST


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