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clairemoss@hotmail.com (England)

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Feeling Sorry For Celia
Feeling Sorry For Celia
by Jaclyn Moriarty
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read This Book, You Will Not Regret It., 19 Feb 2001
Although a book comprising only of letters may be assumed to be limited in content and style by sticking to this format, in this book, that simply isn't the case. Fresh, laugh-out-loud funny, almost tear inducing in places of poignency , this book is highly original.
Elizabeth is a heroine having a tough time of it, although because she is likeable, she doesn't complain. Her single mother is a busy ad exec, who communicates to her only in corporate style memo's, her ditzy best friend is missing, she has a non-existant love life, and to top it all, she has been forced by her well-meaning English Tutor to write letters to a complete stranger in rival school.
The plot keeps you, along with Elizabeth, guessing until the very end, and is in addition to a well structured read, it is a brilliant advert for letter writing. Read it. Please.


The Cuckoo Tree
The Cuckoo Tree
by Joan Aiken
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dido's Finally Home!! (But not dry), 19 Dec 2000
This review is from: The Cuckoo Tree (Paperback)
Dido's finally back in England with an injured Captain Hughs, who carries vital information about yet another plot to dethrone the current monarch- King James.
After Captain Hughs is further incapacitated, Dido seeks help at a nearby manor house, inhabited by a bored boy, a mad witch and a gambling adict. As you might expect from this setup, little help is forthcoming, and Dido is forced to depend on nursing from an alleged nurse, Mrs Lubbage with a dubious hygiene record who lives in a row of dillapidated cottages.
As usual Dido's good nature and cheerfulnes means that she is helped by as many people as try to obstruct her, including a band of smugglers a blind wise old man, (aren't they all?), and a Lord and his pet elephant.
In all probablity, I don't need to tell you that she foils the incredibily bizaare plot to undermine St Paul's Cathedral, (suspend all disbelief there), and at the end of the book, she receives a pleasant, (for once), suprise.
The usual mix of magic, mayhem and an endearingly bemused Dido combine to yet again provide an immensly readable and fun book.


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