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Accy, Ossy, Church and Clayton in Old Picture Postcards
Accy, Ossy, Church and Clayton in Old Picture Postcards
by Verina Brassington
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars About the author, 26 April 2005
This book was first published in the mid 1980's and gives an overview of the Hyndburn area, covering legends and all the properties that can be found on the "Acorn Trail" in the towns concerned, the start being at the Town Hall building in Accrington.
This is a reprint of that original and I cannot account for it's veracity. The author sadly passed away in November 2000 and, as her only child, I am pleased to see that, although difficult to obtain, this book is still in print.


Drawing Blood
Drawing Blood
by Poppy Z. Brite
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A cartoon life, 26 Dec 2003
This review is from: Drawing Blood (Paperback)
This book centers around the two boys whose lives are missing that special something..............trust and love. Trevor McGee lost his family in a brutal murder while still a small child and at the hands of his cartoonist father, he lived through the torments of his mind only to find himself forced to return to Missing Mile. Zach Bosch is a computer nerd with his own disastrous childhood behind him and now he's running from the FBI after being caught out with his hacking exploits.
This book is wonderfully rich and varied with each character, no matter how minor their role is, being an individual that seems to live and breathe from the page. Admittedly the first time I read it I was decidely ambivalent towards it but after a break of 18 months I returned to it and this novel is simply amazing.
If you've never read any of Poppy Z Brite's work then this is an excellent starting point.


One Rainy Night (Headline feature paperback)
One Rainy Night (Headline feature paperback)
by Richard Laymon
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.09

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The night the rain fell, 26 Dec 2003
The rain was black, pleasantly warm and it fell heavily in the small, unremarkable town of Bixby. After the death of Maxwell Chidi, in a possible racial attack, it began to fall with the coming of the night and it did very "strange" things to all those caught in the rain.
This book is classic Laymon and it tears along at a rip-roaring pace with little time to catch your breath between what have almost become his violent "set pieces". The premise is slightly odd but what else have we come to expect from what must be one of the modern masters of horror writing.
One Rainy Night will grab you from the first paragraph and you will feel slightly cheated when it comes to an end; not because of the ending itself but because it has ended.


The Hellbound Heart
The Hellbound Heart
by Clive Barker
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

2 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars On the way to hell, 26 Dec 2003
This is a pleasingly short book on which the horror classic Hellraiser is based. For once I really would rather watch the film than read the book, the story is sluggish to say the least. Based around the Lemarchand box and its ability to conjure up the cenobites who will lead you to pleasures untold is a good premise but one that hasn't been given that classic Clive Barker touch, maybe the problem is it is all set in "the real world" and not in one of his fantastical places - something which he does far, far better.
Whilst it will fill a rainy afternoon quite enjoyably it is not one that you will want to pick up time and time again.


Prey
Prey
by Michael Crichton
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truth is stranger than fiction, 19 Oct 2003
This review is from: Prey (Paperback)
Yet again Michael Crichton crafts a tale so compelling that you kow it could simply just happen. In a world dominated by technology it is only a matter of time before some bright spark scientist starts looking at Crichton's novels as a blueprint for world destruction.
In Prey he tackles the subject of nanoparticles and also computer intelligence with horrifying results. A simple computer program that helps systems problem solve is used to devastating effect when combined with swarms of nanoparticles allowing them to evolve independently of their creators, once released into the wild they become the hunter and their creators their prey.
Not the easiest of books to read as it contains plenty of technical knowledge but it is written with such conviction and so finely crafted that you can forgive him his forays into the "technical stuff" and just sit back and enjoy a thoroughly enjoyable ride. Dealing with human relationships almost as much as the horrifying results of man's arrogance it is a real page turner and you will not be able to put it down, not even long wnough to wonder if that itch is really an itch or part of the swarm invading you.


The Cellar
The Cellar
by Richard Laymon
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.99

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't go into the cellar, 19 Oct 2003
This review is from: The Cellar (Paperback)
Richard Laymon has the knack of turning what should be abhorrent into an entertaining literary feast and this is the case with The Cellar. The journey takes us through bestiality, paedophilia, torture and some of the most finely crafted suspense horror in a long, long time.
The Cellar is located in the only attraction in Malcasa Point, the infamous Beast House with its blood steeped history and the even stranger Kutch House with no windows and only one door. Running from her deranged husband who has recently been released from gaol Donna Hayes finds herself stranded in Malcasa Point after a car accident in the fog. At her daughter's insistence she takes the Beast House Tour and meets Jud Rucker who changes her life around, albeit temporarily.
What happens from here on in is bloodsoaked but so gripping you don't want to put the book down. Does the beast exist or is it one of the Kutch family playing dress-up? Will they all escape alive? Will they escape the clutches of the Beast House at all?
If you like your horror novels with gore dripping from the page onto your lap as you read this is definitely the book for you.


Bridget Jones's Diary (Film Tie-in): A Novel
Bridget Jones's Diary (Film Tie-in): A Novel
by Helen Fielding
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: 3.85

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars 20th Century Neuroses, 19 Oct 2003
Bridget Jones is your typical 30-something single woman in any large city around the world. At least that's what Helen Fielding would like us to believe. The truth is Bridget Jones is certainly an atypical 30-something single female from a "comfortable" background with a good job, in publishing as it happens, and all the attendant middle-class hangups about her physical size and what people think about her.
If you are not part of this "clique" and you just know that she went to a public school and not the local comprehensive, then this book may well leave you cold. The only bits that will ring true are the getting righteiusly plastered with girlfriends whilst setting the world to rights and bemoaning all men
Frankly this book fitted a time and a place that just doesn't exist any more for most of the world's population. It passes a rainy afternoon but that is about all that can be said for it.


Blood Worship
Blood Worship
by Barbara A. Mack
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars A modern Day Vampire Tale, 19 Oct 2003
This review is from: Blood Worship (Paperback)
Blood Worship is a vampire story set in the hot and steamy climes of Florida. It centres around the teen goth culture and you could at first be forgiven for feeling that Sang Adorer is just another crazed psychopath with sanguinarian tendencies......but as Barbara Mack reveals in shocking detail he is the "real deal".
Jessie Hartwell is not your typical embodiment of the media perception of a goth, having dealt with her mothers tragic and grisly demise she is well equipped for the final showdown with Sang Adorer and his minions.
This tale takes you through the standard vampire mythologies and is fast paced running rapidly into the showdown where the speed slows to create a frisson of tension as you enter the house that has been transformed into a temple of bloodlust.
To say more would be to give away the plot of the book but if you are looking for an entertaining, slightly risqué vampire tale to fill your time with this one should amply suffice.


The Vampire Armand: The Vampire Chronicles: Volume 6
The Vampire Armand: The Vampire Chronicles: Volume 6
by Anne Rice
Edition: Paperback

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars When the plot got lost, 24 Aug 2003
Perhaps one of the most enigmatic of Anne Rice's vampire community I was so looking forward to reading about Armand. Her characters have a way of being wholly believable and it was with great enthusiasm that I began this book, after all her makebelieve world is usually so vivd and consumes you so entirely.
I was sorely disappointed with this book, although Anne Rice is known for her purple prose this book takes it to new heights of tedium. So consumed is she with the power of the pen the story gets lost and left behind early on in the book. This book is an exercise in endurance, you really don't care about the story after the first 50 or so pages you just become determined to see it through to the end.
For any "fan" of the vampire chronicles it is a must read book, but it isn't a good book and definitely not one to return to again and again like an old and welcome friend.


The Mummy, Or Ramses the Damned
The Mummy, Or Ramses the Damned
by Anne Rice
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The romance of Ancient Egypt, 10 Aug 2003
A simply mesmerising book. Forget the Egyptology for a moment and it is the traditional bodice ripper, it sweeps you along on its romantic ride and you will love every second. The scenes on board the ocean liner make you wish that you were there to witness this romance of the century.
Ramses bewilderment at all the technological advances made by man makes you see the world through a childs eyes once again and you really appreciate all we have now.
Free of some of Rice's more flowery prose it is an entirely beliveable book and reminds us of how in vogue Egyptology and its archaeologists really were at the turn of the 20th century.
Not so much of a horror book but a jolly good romp that grips you from page one.
Even if the horror genre normally leaves you cold or romances leave you wanting to kick the dog this book will really deliver the goods.


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