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The Ice Age: poems
The Ice Age: poems
by Paul Farley
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.35

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Only connect, 13 May 2002
This review is from: The Ice Age: poems (Paperback)
Fans of Paul Farley have been waiting a long time for this, the follow-up to his amazing first collection, The Boy from the Chemist is Here to See You. So the questions are (1) What's it like? and (2) Is it any good? To which the answers are (1) Different and (2) Yes, you bet. On the minus side there are fewer of those visceral moments when Farley transports you to a different dimension with a well-chosen word or phrase. However, check out his description of a fly encountering a window as a "wall of light" and "the tang of a dream you can't forget/so carry around all day". On the plus side we are treated to a greater insight into what occupies Farley's mind in his waking hours. By his own admission this book is calmer and less pyrotechnic, and what we get is something more personal, philosophical and grown-up, and all the better for it. His concerns and his treatment of them are almost Larkin-esque (albeit Larkin on acid) - even down to a mutual interest in "postal districts" - and range from ornithology and oceanography (fowl and fish) to metereology, evolution, extinction and our frozen pasts. There is at least one instant classic, The Landing Stage, a powerful meditation on his mother's degenerating state of mind. In fact as you read on, these themes interweave so that by the end you feel, as Eddie Izzard says, that it all connects. With Farley it certainly does. The Ice Age is, to use 70s prog rock terminology, a slow burner. It's one I'll be coming back to again and again.


Coverdale Page
Coverdale Page
Price: 6.48

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A treat for Page's guitar fans, 13 Feb 2002
This review is from: Coverdale Page (Audio CD)
For committed fans of Jimmy Page's guitar playing, this album is a treat and sounds even better than it did when first released in 1993. At the time there was much critical ho-humming over Page's choice of ex-hairdresser ex-Purple vox David "Whitesnake" Coverdale as his frontman. But Coverdale acquits himself well, providing an adequate vocal foil against which Page pits his guitar army, with earth-shaking riffs and exquisite ballads, bringing out intricate orchestrations of light and shade not heard since Physical Graffiti. The sound is lush and widescreen, making earlier outtings with The Firm and on his own solo Outrider seem - by Page's own admission - mere demos. There's no Kashmir here, but Over Now is a riff just waiting for Page to stumble upon and Shake My Tree starts with two disparate motifs, one on "Wailing Cairo guitar" and the other a one-chord skull-hammer, that combine majestically. The ballads Take Me For A Little While and Take A Look At Yourself demonstrate a soft-rock side to Page not hitherto seen, the former graced by some wonderfully melodic guitar decoration. Easy Does It concludes with a powerful acoustic outro that Page must have been hoarding for years. The album tails off towards the end and suffers from patchy lyrics - hence the docking of a star - but will be seen in retrospect as a high point of Page's post-Zeppelin career. He followed this with Plant reunions Unledded and Walking Into Clarksdale, the latter an album with a darker, bleaker texture akin to Presence. But on Coverdale Page, Jim was playing in the sunny uplands,which suggests that if he's looking for a final platform from which to show his chops before he hangs up that trusty Gibson, a further fling with Coverdale could be just the job.


The Boy from the Chemist is Here to See You
The Boy from the Chemist is Here to See You
by Paul Farley
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.32

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lives up to its promise, 7 Dec 2001
Farley's first collection has rightly garnered critical rave reviews but it remains that rare thing in poetry circles these days - fashionable amongst the literati while packing a powerful punch for the rest of us. Farley, who was originally an artist, has an other-worldly take on life and matches it with a precision of language and form that is breathtaking. Having been honoured to meet the man in the flesh, I can only say that in real life he is every bit as captivating as a fan could hope him to be. Hearing him read "Not Fade Away" in his wonderful Liverpuddlian lilt will stay in my mind for a long time. Liverpool is important to his make-up - he has that caustic wit associated with the likes of John Lennon - but others have seen this as an excuse to badge him as an update on the Henri/Patten/McGough Mersey Sound, which is a mistake. While I am a great fan of them, Farley is technically far more accomplished and has much more to say.


GO MY WAY CD US AEZRA 2000 11 TRACK (757667060020)
GO MY WAY CD US AEZRA 2000 11 TRACK (757667060020)
Offered by EliteDigital UK
Price: 18.94

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent return to 1970s form, 8 Dec 2000
Robin Trower has always been a fan-pleaser, turning out new albums regularly and touring in the US (but sadly not the UK yet)every year, but each successive release has tended to appeal to a narrowing fan base. No longer. Go My Way is a terrific return to the form of the 1970s on which his reputation was built. The title track is an 8-minute extravaganza that will become as popular live as Bridge Of Sighs. The rest of the album is as consistent. There are two reasons for the album's success. First, Trower is now his own vocalist. He tried singing first on last year's blues-based album. Now, more confident, he is stretching his vocals further and they complement the songs beautifully. In fact, his singing appears to have changed in part the way Trower writes: vocal and guitar lines are now sparring off each other in a way difficult to achieve when the two are carried by different people. Second, on this album for the first time, Trower has used acoustic guitar as an extensive back-filler, giving his songs added depth and texture as Townshend did on Who's Next. The effect is mesmerising. If you like electric guitar with feeling, buy this album. You won't be disappointed.


Death Wish 2
Death Wish 2
Offered by games
Price: 19.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Much better, in retrospect, than it seemed at the time, 6 Nov 2000
This review is from: Death Wish 2 (Audio CD)
For true Page fans only. This was the first piece of music that Page put to vinyl after the demise of Led Zep.Michael Winner, who lived next door to Page's Tower House, asked him to score the film. The result, for Zepheads expecting more of the old, was a disappointment. Now, however, it seems a well thought-through and assembled collection of rock numbers, synthy ambient pieces, solo acoustic guitar mood pieces and orchestral interludes, which can be appreciared independently of the firm (for those of you like me who don't like the Deathwish series). For die-hard page fans this CD issue is a must - it means you can listen to the whole thing as a single collection of pieces without having to turn it over mid-point. A small but important aspect for the true fan is that the CD insert reproduces the original artwork of the LP cover beautifully (see above)with enhanced white and blue tones. Don't let the price put you off.


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