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The Establishment: And how they get away with it
The Establishment: And how they get away with it
by Owen Jones
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £11.89

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 18 Nov. 2014
A must read, I encourage everybody to buy this book!


Prisms
Prisms
Price: £3.07

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star, 3 Nov. 2014
This review is from: Prisms (Kindle Edition)
Utter s***.


The Knowledge: How to Rebuild our World from Scratch
The Knowledge: How to Rebuild our World from Scratch
by Lewis Dartnell
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.00

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, but difficult, 24 Sept. 2014
A great idea, but the execution could have been better. Dartnell covers some fascinating topics and opened my mind to how the world really works on a foundation level, but ultimately a book like this was always going to be flawed. Obviously Dartnell can not and could not provide everything to that one would need, but because of constraints in the text and over-simplifications, it becomes very difficult to follow and at sometimes this disengages the reader and runs the risk of one losing interest.

Specific chapters such as the ones on agriculture and time and place carry the best moments of the book and are fascinating. Others, such as materials and substances will find you lost and slow down the pace of the book considerably.


Ancient Greece: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
Ancient Greece: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
by Paul Cartledge
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.39

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars What it says on the tin, basically!, 26 Oct. 2012
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A Very Short Introduction to Ancient Greece is just what it says it is: a very short introduction. I bought this book completely in the dark about who the ancient Greeks were or what they did, and this does shed some light and begin painting a picture, but due to word limits and other things, I found myself having to do external research many times just to figure out what on earth the author was referring to.

Very short introductions for topics as vast as Ancient Greece are generally a bad idea. If you can only find time to read on the bus/train and need a pocket sized book, go for this one. If you have more time to kick back and really learn, I would suggest you go and find a more detailed book. I want to be clear: I have no solid complaint; I knew what I was getting in for when I bought the book. I only have a surface interest in Greek history, but for others who want to learn more in-depth, then this short introduction is just a little too short!

The way the author approaches the history is by having a chapter on several major settlements. This is a unique method and the author should be applauded for his intuition, but it gets confusing as one chapter can talk about events that happened much later, and vice versa. Luckily there is a time line at the back for clarity.


Eternity: Our Next Billion Years: Humanity's Next Billion Years (Macmillan Science)
Eternity: Our Next Billion Years: Humanity's Next Billion Years (Macmillan Science)
by Michael Hanlon
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Michael Hanlon has a curious definition of the word 'optimist'., 10 Sept. 2012
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Imagine we are sat at the dinner table, talking about addiction. Someone in the room is quick to accuse me of alcoholism, but immediately I deny it - although my words are drowned out with the free fall of vodka from the liter bottle in my hand right in to my glass. That would be a little bit contradictory, wouldn't you think? Well then imagine Hanlon here telling us he is an 'optimist' of the future and then being bombarded by hypothetical global wars, climate change (which is very real) and overpopulation/lack of sustainable resources. I describe myself as an optimistic. I always imagined things to get better and better. I imagine the world to be a green, clean, and stable place when I am an old man. But this is not so according to Hanlon. Almost every scenario he explains to use involves billions of dead and nightmarish dystopia . No thanks. In fact it is so depressing it has had a serious impact on my mood recently. That being said, it is an interesting read, and Hanlon is a good writer - but it is a little too far-fetched in some cases for me.

Although, maybe it wouldn't be a bad idea for all of the world leaders to read this book. In my point of view, the sooner we start to colonise and terraform other planets, the better.


The Third Reich at War: How the Nazis Led Germany from Conquest to Disaster
The Third Reich at War: How the Nazis Led Germany from Conquest to Disaster
Price: £6.02

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tragic, Catastrophic, Demonic; More So than Any Ficticious Work, 30 Aug. 2012
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I almost felt like I was there reading this book. So interesting particularly as it's told from an entirely German perspective (albeit from a Brit author). I didn't know prior to reading this that is was the Russians who were the Nazis main enemy. 75% of German troops where engaged on the Eastern front at any one time and 80% of German casualties lay at the hands of the Red Army.

You can't help but feel sorry for the ordinary German, who admittedly, were mistakenly led down the path of the Nazis. Great book.


How To Write Your First Novel (Creative Writing (How to Books))
How To Write Your First Novel (Creative Writing (How to Books))
by Sophie King
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.94

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Should be titled 'Women! How to Write Your First Novel', 10 Aug. 2012
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Sophie King's book isn't a bad one. It certainly has some useful insight and tips in to the preparation and development of a novel, but it is brazenly aimed just at women, and women alone. I bought this book and whilst following its helpful tips, quickly grew tired of all the examples that went something like this: "Maybe your heroine in your novel is having trouble finding a man! Or she meets a romantic lover after dropping her children off at school!" King gives the impression that only women like to write novels, and that males shouldn't even be considered. It seems that every hint or tip is just designed purely for women, making it difficult for me to relate to the message she is conveying, (no, King, I do not know what it is like to have my man leave me with my three kids) etc. This book would have been much better had it taken into account both sexes. To this I say, if you are a woman and want to write the kind of stuff other women read, this is the book for you. If you are a male reader and aspiring novelist, avoid this book and look elsewhere.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 3, 2014 7:12 PM BST


The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating
The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating
by David M. Buss
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars What about fetishes?, 24 July 2011
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Overall a very interesting book and equally a very disturbing book; it is one that I think a lot of people should read and that more research should be carried out in this field.

One thing that concerned me is that this book doesn't mention fetishes. Not at all. Not even one mention. Aren't fetishes a large and interesting aspect of the evolution of desire? Where did they come from? What are they for? Why may they have evolved? This book should have dedicated an entire chapter to fetishes and sexual preferences I believe, but it doesn't.

It also gets a tad repetitive, but I would still buy this book. I also wish there was a recent book on human mating: this came out in 2003!!


The Real Global Warming Disaster: Is The Obsession With `Climate Change` Turning Out To Be The Most Costly Scientific Blunder In History?
The Real Global Warming Disaster: Is The Obsession With `Climate Change` Turning Out To Be The Most Costly Scientific Blunder In History?
by Christopher Booker
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £17.99

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Talk about heating up!, 16 Mar. 2011
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Not a bad book. In fact, it is damn well interesting. I had heard about cracks in the consensus view for some time now but Booker really handed some amazing information to me. My only gripe is that it gets overwhelming repetitive about half way through the book. The same facts are told, and you almost feel like skipping a few pages. Fortunately there are still some bombshells to be found every now and then so I'd keep reading.

Some of it is really shocking. The fact about the NHS having to pay out for carbon credits really offended me, not too mention Gore's personal electricity bills being substantially higher than the average American. Ah well. Check it out!


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