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Reviews Written by
Norberto Amaral (Aveiro, Portugal)
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Tonight: Franz Ferdinand: Special Edition
Tonight: Franz Ferdinand: Special Edition
Price: £11.35

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, refreshed and refreshing!, 3 Feb. 2009
I am truly wondered at this album. Franz Ferdinand have been able to reinvent themselves and yet still keep their essence, their unique sound. I don't know how exactly that can be explained in words - you just have to listen to it.

The songs don't all sound the same like in previous albums (though I still loved them), some border on dance, others on garage rock, others on some kind 'dirty pop' and parts of others yet... you think you're listening to house music!

The resulting sounds are very refreshing and show that Franz Ferdinand are definitely not a one[album]-hit wonder. If they keep doing this they will surely continue being very successful in the long term. This is material for being a great rock band until for another decade or two.

You will thank me if you follow my advice to put this on the car stereo when you're sitting in the traffic; you will gain a bounce in your feet if you're listening to this on your MP3 player when you're going up and down escalators on the Tube; the sky will be bluer when you're by the pool in the Med.

Just quit reading this and other reviews, buy the whole album (only one or two tracks won't do!) and enjoy the music.


Tonight: Franz Ferdinand (Vinyl)
Tonight: Franz Ferdinand (Vinyl)
Price: £17.77

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, refreshed and refreshing!, 3 Feb. 2009
I am truly wondered at this album. Franz Ferdinand have been able to reinvent themselves and yet still keep their essence, their unique sound. I don't know how exactly that can be explained in words - you just have to listen to it.

The songs don't all sound the same like in previous albums (though I still loved them), some border on dance, others on garage rock, others on some kind 'dirty pop' and parts of others yet... you think you're listening to house music!

The resulting sounds are very refreshing and show that Franz Ferdinand are definitely not a one[album]-hit wonder. If they keep doing this they will surely continue being very successful in the long term. This is material for being a great rock band until for another decade or two.

You will thank me if you follow my advice to put this on the car stereo when you're sitting in the traffic; you will gain a bounce in your feet if you're listening to this on your MP3 player when you're going up and down escalators on the Tube; the sky will be bluer when you're by the pool in the Med.

Just quit reading this and other reviews, buy the whole album (only one or two tracks won't do!) and enjoy the music.


Tonight: Franz Ferdinand
Tonight: Franz Ferdinand
Offered by DVD Overstocks
Price: £4.61

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, refreshed and refreshing!, 3 Feb. 2009
I am truly wondered at this album. Franz Ferdinand have been able to reinvent themselves and yet still keep their essence, their unique sound. I don't know how exactly that can be explained in words - you just have to listen to it.

The songs don't all sound the same like in previous albums (though I still loved them), some border on dance, others on garage rock, others on some kind 'dirty pop' and parts of others yet... you think you're listening to house music!

The resulting sounds are very refreshing and show that Franz Ferdinand are definitely not a one[album]-hit wonder. If they keep doing this they will surely continue being very successful in the long term. This is material for being a great rock band until for another decade or two.

You will thank me if you follow my advice to put this on the car stereo when you're sitting in the traffic; you will gain a bounce in your feet if you're listening to this on your MP3 player when you're going up and down escalators on the Tube; the sky will be bluer when you're by the pool in the Med.

Just quit reading this and other reviews, buy the whole album (only one or two tracks won't do!) and enjoy the music.


Sigma 10-20mm f4-5.6 EX DC HSM Nikon Fit Lens
Sigma 10-20mm f4-5.6 EX DC HSM Nikon Fit Lens

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An almost brilliant lens but not quite, 31 Jan. 2009
I'm not going to go on about every single detail about this lens but only to say that you shouldn't shoot against the sun because if you do, and regardless of the f/stop you use, the result won't please you: there is too much ugly flare in all shapes, sizes and colours and the non-round blades will project ugly sun rays all over the place.

However, if you steer away from the sun, stop it down a bit and use a good tripod you may take some excellent, razor-sharp images. And all this for a fraction of the price of the original brand's lens!


The Undercover Economist
The Undercover Economist
by Tim Harford
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, thought provoking and fun to read, 31 Jan. 2009
Tim Harford takes you around the world armed with what may be no more than an admiration for markets, incentive schemes and an solid distrust of much of the role of the state ("taxes make markets inefficient").

At first sight you may think, like I did initially, that this guy is nuts. After all, we're in 2009, we're just on the verge of the most serious economic crisis since the Great Depression and this book, though having been written a few years ago, is still droning on 'markets rule' and 'the state should keep to itself'.

In fact, despite the fact that the author devotes a full chapter to 'perfect markets' (ha!) and arrives to a number of startling (and equally implausible) consequences, he then goes on to state that markets aren't perfect after all and that efficiency isn't the only measure of success for markets. After that the rest of the authors ideas become 'easier to swallow' and you keep reading without even pausing to breathe, for the book is well written, extremely interesting in all its subjects, from the reason why coffee at crowded places is so expensive to the reason why some countries are poor, to proposals to curb traffic jams, to why a perfect market may in fact be very volatile.

I find this book intriguing, provoking and quite capable of turning me into an Economics fan, if only for the way I now look for solutions for problems involving people and prices by asking myself about motivations and incentives and so go under the surface of oversimplified assumptions.


The Long Tail: How Endless Choice is Creating Unlimited Demand
The Long Tail: How Endless Choice is Creating Unlimited Demand
by Chris Anderson
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Simple concept yet important consequences, 31 Jan. 2009
This is an extremely simple yet important book about the effect of digital goods and their availability via the internet on the economics of product variety.

The basic premise, the author argues quite convincingly and correctly, is that digital goods (e.g.: music files) combined with virtually free storage allows businesses, and retailers in particular, to have a much larger variety of products to sell than regular businesses that depend on physical goods that need to be brought in, stored in a warehouse, and shipped out to customers. The internet does the rest: it guarantees a huge number of consumers whose combined needs make it easier to sell all kinds of products. This is why it's called the Long Tail: what used to be a large number of unsold products is now getting both larger (more products) and more profitable (higher sales of these 'niche' products).

Traditional businesses focus on getting as much value as possible from a small number of products, therefore restricting consumer choice. They focus on what's called the 'top' products. In fact, though they may be getting more sales from a small number of products, they are losing a lot of money because they're not carrying a large enough variety of products. The author also takes on Barry Schwartz's 'The Paradox of Choice' by arguing that more choice doesn't have to be detrimental to quality of life (as Schwartz argues) because Internet-based businesses allow consumers to easily filter and compare products in order to make a choice. I think here the jury's still out and only time will tell in the long run if a huge variety of available products is a good or a bad thing for modern life.

The concept of the Long Tail has revolutionised modern retail. If you go back to 10 or 15 years ago and compared retailers you'd find huge differences.

I quite enjoyed reading this book. Don't pay too much attention to what other reviewers might say about how simplistic this book is: it may be simple, but not simplistic, and regardless of how simple is the concept, it is important to understand the mechanics and consequences of the Long Tail.


The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More
The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More
by Chris Anderson
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple concept yet important consequences, 31 Jan. 2009
This is an extremely simple yet important book about the effect of digital goods and their availability via the internet on the economics of product variety.

The basic premise, the author argues quite convincingly and correctly, is that digital goods (e.g.: music files) combined with virtually free storage allows businesses, and retailers in particular, to have a much larger variety of products to sell than regular businesses that depend on physical goods that need to be brought in, stored in a warehouse, and shipped out to customers. The internet does the rest: it guarantees a huge number of consumers whose combined needs make it easier to sell all kinds of products. This is why it's called the Long Tail: what used to be a large number of unsold products is now getting both larger (more products) and more profitable (higher sales of these 'niche' products).

Traditional businesses focus on getting as much value as possible from a small number of products, therefore restricting consumer choice. They focus on what's called the 'top' products. In fact, though they may be getting more sales from a small number of products, they are losing a lot of money because they're not carrying a large enough variety of products. The author also takes on Barry Schwartz's 'The Paradox of Choice' by arguing that more choice doesn't have to be detrimental to quality of life (as Schwartz argues) because Internet-based businesses allow consumers to easily filter and compare products in order to make a choice. I think here the jury's still out and only time will tell in the long run if a huge variety of available products is a good or a bad thing for modern life.

The concept of the Long Tail has revolutionised modern retail. If you go back to 10 or 15 years ago and compared retailers you'd find huge differences.

I quite enjoyed reading this book. Don't pay too much attention to what other reviewers might say about how simplistic this book is: it may be simple, but not simplistic, and regardless of how simple is the concept, it is important to understand the mechanics and consequences of the Long Tail.


The Long Tail: How Endless Choice is Creating Unlimited Demand
The Long Tail: How Endless Choice is Creating Unlimited Demand
by Chris Anderson
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple concept yet important consequences, 31 Jan. 2009
This is an extremely simple yet important book about the effect of digital goods and their availability via the internet on the economics of product variety.

The basic premise, the author argues quite convincingly and correctly, is that digital goods (e.g.: music files) combined with virtually free storage allows businesses, and retailers in particular, to have a much larger variety of products to sell than regular businesses that depend on physical goods that need to be brought in, stored in a warehouse, and shipped out to customers. The internet does the rest: it guarantees a huge number of consumers whose combined needs make it easier to sell all kinds of products. This is why it's called the Long Tail: what used to be a large number of unsold products is now getting both larger (more products) and more profitable (higher sales of these 'niche' products).

Traditional businesses focus on getting as much value as possible from a small number of products, therefore restricting consumer choice. They focus on what's called the 'top' products. In fact, though they may be getting more sales from a small number of products, they are losing a lot of money because they're not carrying a large enough variety of products. The author also takes on Barry Schwartz's 'The Paradox of Choice' by arguing that more choice doesn't have to be detrimental to quality of life (as Schwartz argues) because Internet-based businesses allow consumers to easily filter and compare products in order to make a choice. I think here the jury's still out and only time will tell in the long run if a huge variety of available products is a good or a bad thing for modern life.

The concept of the Long Tail has revolutionised modern retail. If you go back to 10 or 15 years ago and compared retailers you'd find huge differences.

I quite enjoyed reading this book. Don't pay too much attention to what other reviewers might say about how simplistic this book is: it may be simple, but not simplistic, and regardless of how simple is the concept, it is important to understand the mechanics and consequences of the Long Tail.


Dane-Elec zLight No Limit USB 2.0 Drive with Extra 1GB Online Archiving 8GB Ref DA-ZP-08GZLNO-R
Dane-Elec zLight No Limit USB 2.0 Drive with Extra 1GB Online Archiving 8GB Ref DA-ZP-08GZLNO-R

2.0 out of 5 stars Not crazy about it but does the job just enough, 31 Jan. 2009
Here's a quick view of this product. On the up side:
1. Does what it says, reliably
2. Nice feel to the touch. Good quality rubber
3. Very compact. Not one of the smallest, yet much smaller than the average

On the down side:
4. Very slow writing, quick enough reading
5. Cap becomes loose after a short while
6. Whole to put a wire handle through is located on the cap so if the cap comes off (it will, just give it enough time) you will lose the USB drive


Making Sense: Philosophy Behind the Headlines
Making Sense: Philosophy Behind the Headlines
by Julian Baggini
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoughtful, mind provoking and with lasting effect, 31 Jan. 2009
I read this book over a year and a half ago and every now and then I still think about some of the points the author made. Most of the contents of the book felt brand new to me and left quite an impression.

In this book the author looks at some headlines in the mass media and makes the reader rethink what by now seem implied truths by methodically thinking through each one. The best chapters are about the morality of war, GM foods and ethics (positive and negative freedoms, i.e. 'freedom from' and 'freedom to') and made me think particularly hard, if only because I had to dig deep to understand why I disagreed with the author in some cases - I had a strong gut reaction against some of the points, but then if the book is meant to make you think hard, then it matters little if you reach different conclusions.

The book is extremely well written and definitely not dull. You will most surely enjoy reading this just for the pleasure of it.


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