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Susman "Susman" (London Mills IL)
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Davidoff - Cool Water Eau De Toilette Spray (Limited Edition) - 200ml/6.7oz
Davidoff - Cool Water Eau De Toilette Spray (Limited Edition) - 200ml/6.7oz
Offered by Good-Trade
Price: £69.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A cool and vibrant fragrance (Citrus/Fruity, Fresh/Aquatic), 5 Mar. 2015
For me this is a classic fragrance.

A cool and refreshing fragrance that's not overpowering - it's very pleasant and fresh, and not overpowering. I have been using this fragrance off and on for 20 years and its great. Its longevity could be better - but it is not bad as it wears well and it really does smells divine and is very masculine fragrance. if you shop around you can get this for good price.


Eagle (Saladin Trilogy) by Hight, Jack (2011)
Eagle (Saladin Trilogy) by Hight, Jack (2011)
by Jack Hight
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth a Look, 5 Mar. 2015
This is the second novel after his successful novel the Siege, I found the book very interesting from two aspects the content of History, while the work is fiction, the background and the Historical content seem well researched and one can see that in the last 800 years or so we still dealing with the fallout of what happened, and the problems of the Middle East today, in this case however, the Religious extremists are from the West. The author seems to wrap himself in dialogue, he enjoys the interaction and word play between his characters. It is nice to see the way in which the interaction is being created. At over four hundred pages this novel does take some small commitment, I would not call it a 'light read'. That said it is readable and if you like your fiction with a heavy dose of History then this is the book for you. What is also nice, in-deed more helpful is the fact that more detail and background information is available on the internet. So if you wanted to know why Muslim prayer is five times a day, the Author's web page explains some rather interesting facts about this, the eye opener for this reader was the fact that some early Christian prayer and tradition showed great similarity to the way Islam prayer is performed, I am just illustrating one small thread. You do not necessarily need all these bits of information, as the book carries itself well. From my perspective all these little nuggets of information made the novel that more interesting. All in all a good start to series of books, I keenly await the next novel in the series. For my tastes the book rated a good four stars, certainly worth reading - enjoy!


Ultradex Daily Oral Rinse 500ml
Ultradex Daily Oral Rinse 500ml
Price: £6.38

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Works well enough, 5 Mar. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The mouthwash has no after taste, although for those people that need it, there is a `Peppermint flavour sachet' in the box. Even after eating breakfast, my mouth still felt clean - in fact, my mouth feels fresh all day. They are, however, on the expensive side. This product also deals with the plaque and bacteria that causes decay.

I also use the toothpaste, from the same brand and on first time use, the taste took a little getting used to it, but by the next day, I did not notice at all. What is great got is that clean feeling that you only normally experience after a visit to the dentist and hygienist.


By Jack Hight - Holy War (Saladin Trilogy 3)
By Jack Hight - Holy War (Saladin Trilogy 3)
by Jack Hight
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good, 5 Mar. 2015
This tome makes for an excellent ending to an enthralling to trilogy that traces Saladdin’s life. The author seems to wrap himself in dialogue; he enjoys the interaction and word play between his characters. It is nice to see the way in which the interaction is being created. At over four hundred pages this novel does take some small commitment, I would not call it a 'light read'. That said it is readable and if you like your fiction with a heavy dose of History then this is the book for you. What is also nice, in-deed more helpful is the fact that more detail and background information is available on the internet, via the book’s website. So if you wanted to know why Muslim prayer is five times a day, the Author's web page explains some rather interesting facts about this, the eye opener for this reader was the fact that some early Christian prayer and tradition showed great similarity to the way Islam prayer is performed, I am just illustrating one small thread. You do not necessarily need all these bits of information, as the book carries itself well. From my perspective all these little nuggets of information made the novel that more interesting. All in all a good series of books, for my tastes the book rated a good five stars.


By Michelle Paver - Gods and Warriors by Paver, Michelle ( Author ) ON Aug-28-2012, Hardback
By Michelle Paver - Gods and Warriors by Paver, Michelle ( Author ) ON Aug-28-2012, Hardback
by Michelle Paver
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The first of a quintet of novels, 4 Mar. 2015
This is the first offering, from what is to be a five-part series that is a mixing of magic with ritual from Michelle Paver. Her new series of books tells the narrative of Hylas, a 12-year-old goatherd, whose adventures take him to Ancient Crete and Ancient Egypt. He also has a potent ally in the form Pirra; the stubborn daughter of an Egyptian priestess, the scene is set during the Bronze Age. Other characters featured in the plot, of non-human variety are a lion cub, a falcon and a dolphin (called Spirit).
Book 1 shows our hero Hylas given a bronze dagger by a dying slave, though he is both mystified and at loss to understand why the dreaded Crows – the warrior clan of Koronos and rulers of Mycenae – will do anything within their power to retrieve it. Hylas finds himself on the run. On his fraught journey Hylas encounters the daughter of the High Priestess, courageous 12-year-old Pirra, who has boldly branded her own cheek and escaped an arranged marriage joins him on his journey. Soon they find themselves marooned on an Island, and here they are caught up in hostile enmities between Lakonians, Mycenaeans and Minoans. They soon find that they must rely on each if they are to survive, and this growing shared dependency drives the story.

While a number of other fashionable children's authors imagine a future regularly described in dystopian terms, Paver’s work looks backwards more with a positive eye to the past. This book illustrates the quality of Paver's research is impeccable and, reading her intense accounts of Bronze Age life really the narrative to the fore. Paver’s brings in well-rounded and stalwart characters that always seem to do the right thing, helped by generous helping of flukes and a succession of eleventh-hour escapes. The authors’ story telling maybe a blend of fantasy and adventure, however, the background to the narrative is facts based archaeology of the Greek Bronze Age and its belief systems of that time frame. It is this attention to detail - innovative storytelling and clean grammatical style as most of written word is written in short, stabbing sentences. The wide ranging success of the first set of books has assured her popularity and success, in my opinion this series will do as well hence my 5 star rating.


The Screaming Staircase (Lockwood & Co.)
The Screaming Staircase (Lockwood & Co.)
by Jonathan Stroud
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £15.58

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just a great read, 4 Mar. 2015
If you have read any of Jonathan Stroud’s other works such as the books in the Bartimaeus Sequence you know you are onto a winner. If you are new to his work then you’ll find in this offering that there is Ghost hunting, - where Ghosts kill, cause murder and mayhem. From the get go the book is great read, and once again the Mr Stroud’s abilities to generate some quirky but always well rounded and interesting characters is amazing. Really what is there not like about this book? In short this very good story telling and please do not pigeon hole yourself over which age group may read it, whether you in your teens or your sixties this book covers all.


The Thing From Another World (1951) [DVD]
The Thing From Another World (1951) [DVD]
Dvd ~ Margaret Sheridan
Price: £4.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scientists who meddle with things better left alone, 3 Mar. 2015
The Dramatic "slow burning letters through background" opening title sequence; were enough to sear this film into my childhood psyche, and maybe that is why speculative fiction has attracted me so much. This is a film is based on the 1938 novella "Who Goes There?" by John W. Campbell.

The narrative of the film, is already been done well in other reviews. What I wanted to try in my review is to look at other aspects. Our lead, forced by the circumstances of the situation is Captain Hendry (Kenneth Tobey) who plays a credible leader of his men. He exhibits a very human side in that he realizes he does not know everything and is willing to take pertinent advice. Robert Cornblaithe is excellent as Dr. Carrington. He comes of being "highbrow" and arrogant - yet still likeable enough, as he does admire Captain Hendry - that said, he cannot see eye-to-eye with him on their circumstances or how best to deal with the "Thing From Another world." Every character in the movie is well played. Their look and attire fit their characterisations and each Professor/scientist is believable. However, Margaret Sheridan seems only there to add a feminine touch and love interest, sadly this is, for me anyway, is the only thing that makes this production somewhat dated. Apart from the obvious villain of the piece, the so called "intellectual carrot" - as one person calls him. Dr Carrington character is an amalgam 20th century scientists, which the public felt were out of touch, and were too focused on the science, then over concerns surrounding the perceived negatives of the new nuclear age.

--" A film that tapped into a post-Hiroshima uncertainty about science and antagonistic views of scientists who meddle with things better left alone"--

The creature is better presented as being frightening. You hardly ever see him. When you do, it is only for brief moments at a time and usually in the dark. That frightening vocalization of "The Thing" is very original in that it is not just a growl but sounds ethereal at times. This is all very spooky. The narrative that is being told; is well known, and still gives it a good account of itself, as it is easy to identify with the creature since he is humanoid.

If you boil down the constituents, you get suspense, drama and mood - this original production had the benefit of being monochrome to add to the suspense and unreserved danger the players are in. The choice is yours. I myself enjoy the original a little more as it holds up today probably better, While Jon Carpenter's version is more in line with the book, and it just feels different.


Braun Silk Epil 7 7561 Wet/Dry Cordless Epilator with 5 Attachments
Braun Silk Epil 7 7561 Wet/Dry Cordless Epilator with 5 Attachments
Price: £84.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Exceedingly effective when used on both wet and dry skin, 2 Mar. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is pretty much my partner's review

This epilator can be exceedingly effective when used on both wet and dry skin. It "tweezed" hairs at a notable rate, thus attaining regularly smooth results, I only needed to go over most areas of the legs once to get a hair-free finish, and especially good at removing even the shortest hairs. The epilator comes with extra caps shaped to suit different body areas and give varying levels of comfort whilst epilating. The sensitive area (body) cap is used for smaller areas such as underarms. The instructions warn that underarms are `particularly sensitive to pain'. The increasingly loud, high-pitched noise the epilator makes when you first turn it on is `quite scary', but I soon got used to it. The device itself needs charging for around 1 hour before you can use it, but when fully charged you get just under 50mins usage from it. The device has a light, which can be useful when shaving legs.

The epilator was easy to clean after I had used it wet, as I simply ran each part under the tap. However, for best performance best to clean the tweezers with the small cleaning brush that comes with it. So, a bit of effort is required to keep this epilator in good condition. This is a good all round product with a good variety of attachments.


The Algebraist by Banks, Iain M. (2005) Paperback
The Algebraist by Banks, Iain M. (2005) Paperback
by Iain M. Banks
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ian Banks had the skill to paint a portrait of a universe from the ground, 2 Mar. 2015
The Algebraist is a speculative fiction novel by the writer Ian M. Banks; this was his third science-fiction novel that was based wholly outside of his long-standing culture series. It can be further said that the narrative and the encapsulating universe are not the same as The Culture books.

This novel is based in the year 4034 A.D. where we find that with the assistance of other sentient beings, humanity has spread far across the galaxy. Here Human Mercatoria society is a complex one in that is based on feudal hierarchy, and the overriding religious zeal to rid the galaxy of artificial intelligences. This is because it is believed that artificial intelligences were the cause of a catastrophic previous war. As the narrative progresses, a calamity ensues in the form of a large fleet of marauders, known as the Beyonders. These marauders destroyed the local faster than light portal. Thus ensuring that they have cut the system of Nasqueron's star (Ulubis) off from the rest of the galaxy by virtue of the fact that nobody can leave, or arrive by faster than light travel, and hence have to use sub-light travel. This then means it would seemingly take an eternity to go anywhere, or for that matter arrive from any other star system.

Our main protagonist is one Fassin Taak who is a Slow Seer at the court of the Nasqueron Dwellers. The Dwellers are in interesting race of sentient beings that inhabit gas giants throughout the galaxy, their lives are based on prestige in the form of kudos. They are beholding to no other species, largely they do not get involved with other species, which they consider "Quick". Essentially this means that all sentient beings that have a similar lifespan of human beings can be considered this. However, the "Slow", such as the Dwellers experience life at a much slower rate. For those Dwellers who survive the rigors of adolescence, they can live for millions of years. As a species, it is rumoured that they have been around for billions of years.

Our unlikely hero Fassin Taak is subtle, intelligent and a resourceful individual and he is somewhat of a reluctant participant in the events that are about to transpire. He soon finds himself earmarked for a special mission. For on a previous trip to the Dweller world, he had uncovered a text containing information about the Dweller list. This list is of import as it gives various coordinates of transferable wormholes, which only the Dwellers use to travel faster than light. That said, some say that due to their longevity they do not need faster than light travel, as they could easily transverse the galaxy at sub - light speeds and feel nothing of it - purely because of their long life spans and hence this list does not exist. For Fassin, the stakes are high for if he finds this long lost knowledge, it could perhaps reshape the entire eco-political nature of the known universe. Unfortunately his singular mission goes wrong from the get go, placing Fassin at the mercy of the Dwellers. If things were not bad enough, a tyrannical warlord, in loose alliance with the Beyonders, has decided to invade Ulubis system- as he too wishes to have the secrets of the Dweller portals. To help defend Ulubis the Mercatoria have sent their own fleet to protect the system against this warlord. Fassin's world is on tender hooks, to see which of the two fleets that are approaching their system at sub- light speed will get their first. Will the Beyonders and the tyrannical warlord arrived first and create havoc and destruction? On the other hand, will it be the Mercatoria forces that will help defend the system against this evil alliance.

What follows is pretty much an octane driven espionage tale that is full of imagination and mega ordnance, which seems to permeate Fassin's travels. Ian Banks explores both the humane and the not so humane aspects of his characters showing their self-deception, their complexities and weaknesses. A narrative that is very much a Baroque painting of aliens in capitalist overdrive, we see the author present an eloquent form of his twin obsessions of having rumpus fun and dealing with socio-politics. The attention to detail is meticulous, as Banks details new worlds, with all their peculiar personalities, and he then has the ability; to show the reader the full gamut of his skill to paint a portrait of a universe from the ground up in terms of the chemical to the emotional. We are shown planets, moons, interstellar dust and the stormy nature of gas giants. For me this narrative is a large-scale science-fiction endeavour at its best, although some have labelled this weighty tome, as being bereft of a good editor. At times, the plot can seem somewhat confusing. However, this book needs to be read slowly to fully appreciate the huge canvas that the author has brought us. It is interesting to note that in an interview in 2004 Ian Banks had commented that this particular novel could become part of a trilogy, however, now it is a stand-alone novel as Ian Banks passed away in the summer of 2013.

It is said that we are all made from, and are the products of former stars. In my opinion Ian Banks was a star that shone many times more brightly, who had both insight and unbelievable imagination and I like many of his fans, are appreciative of his sharing this great talent with us. This is a book that I come back to every year or so. I either read it or listen to the audible version, and without fail always come away with something new I have just gleaned. This book is worthy of a good five stars, and is thus highly recommended.


Invasion of the Body Snatchers [Blu-ray]
Invasion of the Body Snatchers [Blu-ray]
Dvd ~ Donald Sutherland
Price: £10.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A potent re-creation that expands upon themes and ideas from the original, 2 Mar. 2015
There is a lot more, to the film than you'd think from just reading the movie title.

This is the first remake of assimilation and covert Alien infiltration classic of the 1950s, the new setting for the invasion from a small town to the city of San Francisco, in the late 1970s, and starts as Matthew Bennell notices that several of his friends are complaining that their close relatives are in some way changed. This is a solid speculative fiction narrative tinged with within a horror context with rather good production values. Those values include good direction by Philip Kaufman, camera-work by Michael Chapman in the form of the facial close-ups and interesting camera angles. The acting of the cast of main characters was comprised of Donald Sutherland, Brooke Adams, Veronica Cartwright, Jeff Goldblum and last but not least the late Leonard Nimoy whose characterization; as the all explaining psychiatrist was exceedingly well done, as you really want to believe his explanation of events, as the truth is all too frightening. Donald Sutherland had quite a lot of the dialogue and was the most notable. All of it added up, for me anyway to a very good re-make that really brought the original themes to a more modern setting and a much darker closure.

--------------------Dare you take a nap?-------------------------

For me, this movie did so well in the build-up, with the uncertainty and suspense that translates into a real crescendo, and proved you don't need a lot of violence and body parts to scare the viewer. In fact the creepiest thing of the movie - and it WAS scary too - was the eerie guttural sound - the piercing pod scream. The film is a visual treat. The star of the first film, by the way - Kevin McCarthy, makes a great cameo appearance, which was a nice touch. Due to Kevin McCarthy's appearance and warning, some viewers have seen this movie as possible sequel to the 1950s movie.

If there is anything to dislike about the film, it's the fact that it seems to be shown on TV late at night, which makes this viewer very apprehensive about going to bed.


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