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The Vampire Lovers Blu-Ray Remastered
The Vampire Lovers Blu-Ray Remastered
Dvd ~ Peter Cushing
Price: £15.80

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ... up the scatches and speckles and the picture looks great but sadly the opening decapitation has not been reinstated, 9 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Final Cut have cleaned up the scatches and speckles and the picture looks great but sadly the opening decapitation has not been reinstated. Catch it on youtube. Otherwise excellent.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 12, 2014 12:00 PM GMT


Blood and Roses (1960) Import DVD aka "Et mourir de plaisir" aka "...und vor Lust zu sterben"
Blood and Roses (1960) Import DVD aka "Et mourir de plaisir" aka "...und vor Lust zu sterben"
Dvd ~ Mel Ferrer

4.0 out of 5 stars with icy Annette Vadim perfect as the porcelain articulation of a romantic tragedy, 25 Oct. 2014
"...And Die Of Pleasure"

Modern (contemporary 1960) adaptation of Joseph Sheridan le Fanu’s classic 1872 vampire tale “Carmilla”, proposing a narrative ambiguity as to whether or not the protagonist is actually possessed by the spirit of her long dead ancestor or rather suffering from a depressive illness. Despite some unfortunate misogyny the text works well, with icy Annette Vadim perfect as the porcelain articulation of a romantic tragedy. The erotic and the lesbian undercurrents seem quite mild in comparison with contemporary cinematic vampire fiction, so if one is looking for sensation one must look elsewhere, and although narrative driven and virtually sans action, the film climaxes with a memorably hallucinatory dream sequence. Unfairly criticised by Phil Hardy's 'Encyclopedia of Horror Movies' as plagiarising Cocteau (homage might have sounded more appropriate if that was what Vadim intended), "...And Die Of Pleasure' manages to stand artistically alone and seems a refreshing take on a theme made bombastic by Hammer.

Distributor Paramount re-edited and re-titled the film “Blood and Roses” for its American release in 1961, using an English language version shot simultaneously and no doubt voiced by the same cast. The film subsequently lost several minutes of footage (including Director Roger Vadim in cameo in a window seat on the Caravel) and gained some aerial shots for padding while Carmilla informs us of her new reincarnation. The voice-over is truly embarrassing and serves only as clumsy exposition for the targeted unsophisticated 'horror movie' audience, and along with shots of a full blown rose this reconstructed narrative needlessly emphasises the fact that our lovely heroine 'is' indeed a vampire. Also included in the American version are a couple of musical queues where sequences run silent in the Continental version- one after the party, one in the crypt, one at the dinner table and of course during the entirety of the famous dream sequence. Controversial shots of brief nudity and violence were also excised from the export print. Removed were the naked and bloodied breast that is exposed when Carmilla tears her ‘wedding’ gown before the mirror, the uncovered nipple of the dead girl Lisa at the police station and the topless shots of Carmilla’s stunt double during the operating theatre part of the dream sequence. Note that there is a brief full colour shot of Georgia in the dream sequence that is not in either the German DVD or the American version, and the topless operating shot and most of the blood gushing from Carmilla's precognitive bomb-torn dress is missing from this German release.

Despite minor niggles- the soundtracks of both the German and French versions are very noisy and the contrast is a little high, this German release is still a great buy.

A fine film and so very neglected.


Dracula [Blu-ray] [1979] [Region Free]
Dracula [Blu-ray] [1979] [Region Free]
Dvd ~ Frank Langella
Price: £12.77

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I have always enjoyed Badham's overblown Gothic romantic version of the Deane and ..., 22 Sept. 2014
I have always enjoyed Badham's overblown Gothic romantic version of the Deane and Balderston stage play because it delivers mostly all it sets out to achieve, mood, music, romance, excitement, violence (but not the sex), and yet I have harboured a little negative ever since I saw it back in 1979... a small thing no less to my 54 year old sensibilities, but it illustrates quite vividly the ransacking of obscure classic works that are never given credit.

In 1977 I purchased a Corgi paperback entitled "The Rivals of Dracula" edited by Michel Parry and it includes a lost story from 1860 called "The Mysterious Stranger".

Badham's film-

Dracula (to Lucy) having invited her to his candlelit castle for dinner-
Dracula: "But I must warn you to take care."
Lucy: "Whatever for?"
Dracula: "If at any time my company does not please you, you will have only yourself to blame, for an acquaintance who seldom forces himself... but is difficult to be rid of." (Dracula can be forgiven his lazy English, in Stoker at least, for ending his sentence with a preposition, but screenwriter W. D. Richter cannot, and not only proves sloppy English but also plagiarism... or is that 'homage'?!)

Compare with the 1860 Anonymous story "The Mysterious Stranger"...

Franziska: "Well, since the moon is your sun, pray pay a frequent visit to our castle by the light of its rays. I think ... it will be very nice for us to be acquainted."
Knight Azzo: "If my company does not please you at any time, you will have only yourself to blame for an acquaintance with one who seldom forces himself, but is difficult to shake off."

There are so many similarities in "Dracula" to this almost forgotten Gothic gem that prove Stoker's inspiration, and for Sheridan Le Fanu's "Carmilla" for that matter... just like when Argento ripped off De Quincey, yet it is almost sad that so often it is the case that there is no respectful acknowledgement for the source prose.

So the prose lives, and as far as I am aware, Badham's film is the only adaptation of Dracula to lift this dialogue.

That said, I look forward to the Bluray. It would be nice to think that the print being used was the original Technicolor one and not Badham's dull-toned 'muted' version that robs his romance of its lush vibrancy. Dreaming of course...


Fall of the House of Usher [Blu-ray]
Fall of the House of Usher [Blu-ray]
Dvd ~ Vincent Price
Price: £12.20

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Rise'of 'Fall', 11 Mar. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent bluray. Even better with the restoration of the 'full' title. Highly recommended. Bring on more Corman, especially 'Tomb of Ligeia'.


The Mummy (Blu-ray + DVD) [1959]
The Mummy (Blu-ray + DVD) [1959]
Dvd ~ Peter Cushing
Price: £20.93

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wraps off!, 1 Nov. 2013
Great release and many thanks for including the superior 4:3 version. (Not a fan of cropping away picture information to justify 16:9 framing). Top drawer Hammer.


The Art of Hammer: Posters from the Archive of Hammer Films
The Art of Hammer: Posters from the Archive of Hammer Films
by Marcus Hearn
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £24.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Under The Hammer, 3 Nov. 2010
Nice coffee table browser. My only gripe: Marcus, why omit the original British poster for Lust for a Vampire in favour of the less than spectacular Belgian offering?


Lust For A Vampire [DVD]
Lust For A Vampire [DVD]
Dvd ~ Ralph Bates

15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Strange Love, 29 April 2005
This review is from: Lust For A Vampire [DVD] (DVD)
In 1970 Hammer continued the adventures of Carmilla Karnstein with this silly but entertaining and oft maligned follow up to The Vampire Lovers. Every forty years the vampire family Karnstein return to wreak havoc among the peasantry, only this time there's an all girls finishing school to sink their teeth into. Danish pastry Yutte Stensgaard steps into Ingrid Pitt's role as the seductive predator, putting the bite on Pippa Steele and Judy Matheson and she looks absolutely ravishing! Michael Johnson is the weedy love interest, as shallow an individual as you will ever meet who beats poor Ralph Bates to square one, the latter knocked off in one of those glorious dream-like sequences that make these films a wonder to watch. Mike Raven gives an hilarious turn as Count Karnstein and his prognosis of "a heart attack!" is a real rib-tickler. Centre stage is taken by the cemetery love scene; swirling ground fog, Carmilla doffing her clothes and going cross-eyed at the moment of orgasm, Tracy warbling the title theme Strange Love... "...if I were a vampire, then you would die." Gorgeous production, even if the camera crew are glimpsed unintentionally during the coachman staking scene and the special effects are not so special. Followed a year later by the even sillier and over rated Twins of Evil.


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