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Anne Bradshaw "Anne Bradshaw" (UK)
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The Fun Starts Here: A practical guide to the bliss of babies
The Fun Starts Here: A practical guide to the bliss of babies
by Paula Yates
Edition: Paperback

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Inspiration for New Mums!, 3 May 2007
This was the book that made motherhood cool for me!
Forget Doctors Spock, Leach, Stoppard and all those other 'old school' experts - Paula tells it how it is, and she doesn't make you feel guilty about not being perfect in every way.
She is extremely amusing and warm and approachable to read. Ignore everything you THINK you might know about her - as an inspirational confidence-booster for new mums, this book is hard to beat.


Notes on a Scandal
Notes on a Scandal
by ZoŽ Heller
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Be Warned!!, 2 Mar. 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Notes on a Scandal (Paperback)
Be warned, reader! This book will take your hand, then it will possess you and absorb you whether you like it or not. It's like a car-crash on a page, and it turns you into a rubber-necked voyeur; or a crack-addict helplessly craving the next chapter ...

While reading it, Barbara Covett's voice (that of the narrator) seemed to be constantly lurking in my head, like some unwanted mother-in-law or persistent neighbour who outstays her welcome. I even found myself dreaming about the two main characters!

And I have never been so engaged by a book whilst feeling so completely unsympathetic to either of the protagonists. Heller writes wonderfully; it's tempting to dash down the page, in a rush to find out what will happen next, and she writes so fluidly that you CAN do that. But it wouldn't do justice to Heller's prose, her observations and characterisation, her wryness which underpins everything in this novel.

So, if you feel able to read this without letting it get under your skin ... go ahead, try it! But I'm still wondering how something which leaves such a nasty taste can be so elegantly done.


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