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Orome "Aldaron" (Lexington, MA USA)

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Cycling Traffic Free: London
Cycling Traffic Free: London
by Jules Selmes
Edition: Paperback

0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars "Traffic-Free", Really?, 30 May 2011
A completely useless book. Poorly organized and presented, with bad maps and difficult to follow directions, none of which, in any case, actually result in anything remotely like a "traffic-free" experience.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 15, 2011 1:32 PM BST


Master Of Disguise [DVD] [2003]
Master Of Disguise [DVD] [2003]
Dvd ~ Dana Carvey
Offered by Qoolist
Price: £6.75

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Criminally Bad, 13 May 2005
Perhaps the worst film I've ever seen. It says something sad about the film industry that this film was ever made. Couldn't they see in the initial concept reviews that there was nothing funny or entertaining here? Couldn't they tell in casting that no one was capable of carrying the roles they were assigned (least of all Cavey). Couldn't they see from the rushes that the film was actually painful to watch?


Adobe Acrobat 7.0 Professional (Windows Upgrade)
Adobe Acrobat 7.0 Professional (Windows Upgrade)

56 of 63 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Avoid: "Worse than Malware", 15 April 2005
Don't take my word for it that's a quote from the title of a recent post excoriating this irritating and increasingly bloated product on Slashdot.
Be warned: Adobe has not learned its lesson, and despite the outcry that followed the release of version 6, this latest release of Acrobat continues Adobe's aggressive trend of intruding into your desktop environment, again, as in version 6 without providing an easy way to undo the damage once its done--in fact, it's now nearly impossible. Like earlier releases, this version of Acrobat adds startup macros and new toolbar buttons to your existing applications and adds menu entries to your desktop "right click" menus. Adobe argues that these are conveniences, but they are entirely unnecessary (for most of us "printing" to Adobe PDF achieves the same result, is much more convenient, and a more natural model), and clutter what for most users is either a too-crowded user interface (for those who don't have the knowledge or patience to customize it) or a carefully tuned one (for those who do). Unlike many well-behaved applications that provide obvious ways of avoiding this kind of intrusive and disruptive behavior (e.g. through a simple checkbox option in a settings dialog), Acrobat's "option" for disabling this behavior, once deeply hidden in the setup process,is now almost completely absent. To disable the "Convert to Adobe PDF" button that mysteriously appears in the Outlook mail editor, for example, one has to be sure to choose "this feature will not be available" from the "Microsoft Outlook" option under "Acrobat PDFMaker" under "Create Adobe PDF". Simply deleting the button using Outlook's toolbar customization feature will not work: it comes right back when the editor is next opened. Similar problems arise in Word, Excel, Visio, Project, and Internet Explorer. And there's simply no way to get rid of the never-used "Convert to Adobe PDF" and "Combine in Acrobat..." entries in that appear in the desktop context menus for files (even if one installs none of the Acrobat PDFMaker features).
For the technically inclined wishing to repair some of the damage that Acrobat 7 does, there are complex but largely effective step by step instructions available on the web, but even the authors of these are driven to despair by version 7: ("Adobe has really pushed the boat out with Acrobat 7 and managed to screw Word royally") .
In short, Acrobat will make a mess of your working environment, there's no way to completely fix it, and even the partial fix is a pain (and not well documented). (This may seem a minor issue, but if every application followed Adobe's reckless example, our working environments would start to look like strip malls, crowded with features screaming for our attention to the point where it is hard to find what we need when we need it. One of the great strengths of the personal computer desktop is that users can configure it in ways that suit their needs; no application should interfere with that.)
Experienced Acrobat users will also notice that this version continues another frustrating trend for Acrobat (and most other Adobe applications): it is yet again slower to launch than the previous version. In fact, on my 2 GHz Pentium 4, it takes longer to launch than the entire Visual Studio .NET development environment, and longer than the boot sequence for Windows XP!
There are other minor problems as well (arbitrary rearrangements of menu and tool bar items, etc.) but these two major flaws are more than bad enough. Unless you really need the latest Acrobat features, you should probably avoid this upgrade. And if the "improvements" in this release are any indication of where Adobe plans to go with future releases, it may be time to start looking elsewhere for a tool for digital document management.
Fortunately, there's no reason at all to upgrade. Version 7 offers no usefully new features, so you can (and should) avoid this one (at all costs).


Adobe Acrobat 7 Professional Full Product (Windows)
Adobe Acrobat 7 Professional Full Product (Windows)

71 of 79 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Avoid: "Worse than Malware", 14 April 2005
Don't take my word for it that's a quote from the title of a recent post excoriating this irritating and increasingly bloated product on Slashdot.
Be warned: Adobe has not learned its lesson, and despite the outcry that followed the release of version 6, this latest release of Acrobat continues Adobe's aggressive trend of intruding into your desktop environment, again, as in version 6 without providing an easy way to undo the damage once its done--in fact, it's now nearly impossible. Like earlier releases, this version of Acrobat adds startup macros and new toolbar buttons to your existing applications and adds menu entries to your desktop "right click" menus. Adobe argues that these are conveniences, but they are entirely unnecessary (for most of us "printing" to Adobe PDF achieves the same result, is much more convenient, and a more natural model), and clutter what for most users is either a too-crowded user interface (for those who don't have the knowledge or patience to customize it) or a carefully tuned one (for those who do). Unlike many well-behaved applications that provide obvious ways of avoiding this kind of intrusive and disruptive behavior (e.g. through a simple checkbox option in a settings dialog), Acrobat's "option" for disabling this behavior, once deeply hidden in the setup process,is now almost completely absent. To disable the "Convert to Adobe PDF" button that mysteriously appears in the Outlook mail editor, for example, one has to be sure to choose "this feature will not be available" from the "Microsoft Outlook" option under "Acrobat PDFMaker" under "Create Adobe PDF". Simply deleting the button using Outlook's toolbar customization feature will not work: it comes right back when the editor is next opened. Similar problems arise in Word, Excel, Visio, Project, and Internet Explorer. And there's simply no way to get rid of the never-used "Convert to Adobe PDF" and "Combine in Acrobat..." entries in that appear in the desktop context menus for files (even if one installs none of the Acrobat PDFMaker features).
For the technically inclined wishing to repair some of the damage that Acrobat 7 does, there are complex but largely effective step by step instructions available on the web, but even the authors of these are driven to despair by version 7: ("Adobe has really pushed the boat out with Acrobat 7 and managed to screw Word royally") .
In short, Acrobat will make a mess of your working environment, there's no way to completely fix it, and even the partial fix is a pain (and not well documented). (This may seem a minor issue, but if every application followed Adobe's reckless example, our working environments would start to look like strip malls, crowded with features screaming for our attention to the point where it is hard to find what we need when we need it. One of the great strengths of the personal computer desktop is that users can configure it in ways that suit their needs; no application should interfere with that.)
Experienced Acrobat users will also notice that this version continues another frustrating trend for Acrobat (and most other Adobe applications): it is yet again slower to launch than the previous version. In fact, on my 2 GHz Pentium 4, it takes longer to launch than the entire Visual Studio .NET development environment, and longer than the boot sequence for Windows XP!
There are other minor problems as well (arbitrary rearrangements of menu and tool bar items, etc.) but these two major flaws are more than bad enough. Unless you really need the latest Acrobat features, you should probably avoid this upgrade. And if the "improvements" in this release are any indication of where Adobe plans to go with future releases, it may be time to start looking elsewhere for a tool for digital document management.
Fortunately, there's no reason at all to upgrade. Version 7 offers no usefully new features, so you can (and should) avoid this one (at all costs).


Xbox Music Mixer
Xbox Music Mixer
Offered by marxwax
Price: £15.56

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Expensive and Disapointing, 9 Jan. 2005
This review is from: Xbox Music Mixer (Video Game)
Terrible in almost every way. Not HD (as claimed), ugly UI, overpriced and poor quality karaoke tracks, difficult to use, and poorly integrated with existing Windows networks. This is a product that cries out for seamless integration with your home music library which the current Xbox deliberately avoids. The few karaoke tracks that are available are overpriced and not what anyone really wants to play with anyway.


The Official Fahrenheit 9-11 Reader
The Official Fahrenheit 9-11 Reader
by Michael Moore
Edition: Paperback

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Mixed Bag, 16 Dec. 2004
This book is a useful but unnecessary appendix to the (excellent) film. The bulk of this book is taken up by the script of the film, something that I suspect few readers will have much use for. There are also several short articles and a collection of e-mails to Moore, both of which don't add much that can't be found at various websites. Perhaps the most (or only) useful feature is footnotes indicating the sources for most of the key claims in the film.
Disappointing overall, and certainly lacking any of the compelling energy of the film, but useful if you really need to refer back to sources for the film's assertions.


The Official Fahrenheit 9-11 Reader
The Official Fahrenheit 9-11 Reader
by Michael Moore
Edition: Paperback

8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Mixed Bag, 1 Dec. 2004
This book is a useful but unnecessary appendix to the (excellent) film. The bulk of this book is taken up by the script of the film, something that I suspect few readers will have much use for. There are also several short articles and a collection of e-mails to Moore, both of which don't add much that can't be found at various websites. Perhaps the most (or only) useful feature is footnotes indicating the sources for most of the key claims in the film.
Disappointing overall, and certainly lacking any of the compelling energy of the film, but useful if you really need to refer back to sources for the film's assertions.


Lord of the Rings Risk Trilogy
Lord of the Rings Risk Trilogy
Offered by Smaller World Future
Price: £171.49

23 of 58 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cynical Marketing; Much Better Alternatives Available, 30 Aug. 2004
Lord of the Rings has, unlike the Harry Potter series, inspired some truly excellent games, most notably the rich and subtle cooperative game by Reiner Knizia (one of the best games available on any topic) and the much simpler but still quite deep 2-player Stratego-like 'Confrontation' game (also by Reiner Knizia), both of which, in addition to being excellent games in their own right, are also superbly 'themed': the Lord of the Rings feel and atmosphere comes through during play and one really feels involved in an adventure in Middle Earth. (The 'children's game', again by Knizia, is also worth a look for kids under 8.)
But this game is just junk. Not only is it inherently a dull and tedious game (unless your are a die-hard Risk fan or just don't really care about the game and are looking for a beer-and-pretzels distraction), but it also has absolutely nothing to do with the Lord of the Rings. This game 'theming' at its most cynical: some (not very good) changes in art and some nonsensical rules additions (that don't even work well from a gaming perspective) are all you get with this game.
If you like Risk, stick with the original, or try the sci-fi themed version (2210); if you like Lord of the Rings, avoid this game entirely (and consider some of the superb games mentioned above).


Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Book 3): Adult Edition
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Book 3): Adult Edition
by J. K. Rowling
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Elegant Edition, 27 July 2004
It is not completely accurate to claim, as some reviewers have, that this "adult edition" is no different from the children's edition. Two points are worth noting: first, as compared with the hardcover version, the print is somewhat larger and easier to read, and the pagination is more convenient (not to mention the fact that the book is lighter and thus much easier to hold for sustained periods); second, the cover design is much nicer than the children's edition.
However, for most shoppers, the decision being made is likely which paperback version to pick up and re-read as review for the film or in preparation for "The Half Blood Prince". If that is the case, the only difference is the cover design and, at least for adult readers, the "adult" version's is superior.


Apple iPod mini 4GB - Gold [M9437B/A]
Apple iPod mini 4GB - Gold [M9437B/A]

27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much Cooler Than Expected, 25 July 2004
After all the anti-hype surrounding Apple's "overpriced" low-end iPod, I expected to be very disappointed by this, especially since we already on a full 40G current-generation model; but I was very pleasantly surprised.
The mini's smaller size is far more of an advantage than I had expected, making it the first truly pocketable iPod, and one of the nicest pocketable MP3 players ever. The smaller display (which omits album name) is crisp and clear, and the new control, which combines the wheel and select control of the current generation iPods with the four function buttons, is actually an improvement over the full-sized version's controls.
In every other respect the mini is indistinguishable from its (surprisingly much) larger cousins, except for two: (1) it is still a bit overpriced (but those who must have one need not hesitate) and (2) it's much smaller capacity may not work for many users.


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