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Great Leader, Dear Leader: Demystifying North Korea Under the Kim Clan
Great Leader, Dear Leader: Demystifying North Korea Under the Kim Clan
by Bertil Lintner
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.22

3.0 out of 5 stars Military first, people last, 4 Jan. 2011
The book is more on North Korea and how the image of the country is defined and projected by the two cult like figures; the Great (father) and Dear (son) Leaders rather than about the two personalities itself. The author writes in a very knowledgable style and makes good references to insiders view mainly from defectors and other reports. Bertil Lintner demonstrates the intricate style of autocratic rule exercised by the Dear Leader (son) who appears to be more of a political strategist than the Great Leader (father) who is a guerilla fighter with inflated ego and personality. The author is not patronising in his description of the country. He also highlights aspects when North Korean politics and repressions are wrongly potrayed by the Western media, thereby undermining outsiders view of North Korea and weakening the demands made by human rights groups. The last chapter (Chapter 9 on Future) throws up some interesting strategic speculation on united Korea. Who wants it? What are the assumption? Will South Korea be drowned in financial burden? What would Japan do if they see North Korea, rich in natural resources united with South Korea which has advanced heavy industry pull their forces together. Would Japan tolerate this? Then there is the nuclear issue. Conclusion, for North Korea to really emerge from obscurity, United States must take on North Korea on the nuclear issue.


The Japanese Experience: A Short History of Japan (History of Civilisation)
The Japanese Experience: A Short History of Japan (History of Civilisation)
by W.G. Beasley
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Elaborate because its intricate. Abandoned, 22 Dec. 2010
Cannot entirely agree with G. Carrolls review. Completed two chapters, interesting read but difficult to follow the thread of the story. Beasley is very knowledgeable indeed on the subject but the writer shows the knowledge rather than tells the story. Delves deep and makes too many references to too many characters and periods in his writing which makes it go off tangent. Abandoned after going into Chapter 3.


Saudi Arabia Exposed: Inside a Kingdom in Crisis (UPDATED)
Saudi Arabia Exposed: Inside a Kingdom in Crisis (UPDATED)
by John R. Bradley
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive coverage, 13 Dec. 2010
Well written, easily accessible and meaty. Bradley not only writes this from his desk research but mingles with the ordinary people, speaks to them and asks probing questions when analysing the state of present Saudi Arabia. He has excellent grasp of the powers revolving in the various regions of Saudi Arabia and brings the various social elements together to highlight the tension between the Wahabis and the Al-Saud royal household and the consequences on the general population and its implication on the region. Readers must cope with multitude names of Prince(s), Mohammad(s) and other Arabic names, but manageable to get a grip of the story. Easy read, not deep intellectual stuff.


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