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Wimbledog (London, England)

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Eco-Friendly Wind-Up AM FM Radio With LED Torch
Eco-Friendly Wind-Up AM FM Radio With LED Torch

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works like clockwork, 15 Dec 2010
A small wind-up FM/AM radio with torch, but a handy performer. Radio reception was clear, and the claim of 30 minutes' use from just 1 minute of winding proved more than correct in testing. The speaker was good enough quality for everyday listening, and there's an output to attach headphones.

"Eco-friendly" claims were dented by the volume of plastic packaging, but of course I'd hope for energy savings over the long-term as the product does not use batteries. There is space for a 5v mains adaptor to power the unit if you require.

The torch is just bright enough to be useful in the event of a power cut, but you'd struggle to use it for anything other than checking the fuse box or finding your keys, for example.

Three stars overall, but I'd have thought almost unbeatable considering the low price.

If you're looking to spend more money but want to keep the environmental credentials, try a solar-powered DAB radio.


8 X GU10 LED LIGHT BULBS ENERGY SAVING 3W WARM WHITE ** 3x1W HIGH POWER FOR REPLACING 50W HALOGEN **
8 X GU10 LED LIGHT BULBS ENERGY SAVING 3W WARM WHITE ** 3x1W HIGH POWER FOR REPLACING 50W HALOGEN **
Offered by Brightlightz
Price: £68.95

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bright, white light - they're alright, 28 Nov 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
These bulbs are great - just know what you're getting before ordering.

Ordered as a replacement for 50 watt halogen GU10 bulbs, these 3 watt LED lights consume only 6% of the energy. I find the light more "white" than the yellowish halogen light, which can take some getting used to but was actually what I was looking for. More like actual daylight in spectrum.

The light is much more directional, giving more of a spotlight effect, and I would guess they're only marginally dimmer than their halogen equivalent.

In a while the price will come down and you'd expect that these will become the standard option for spotlights, in the meantime these bulbs are still a great buy once energy and replacement costs are factored in (the manufacturer gives a 50,000 hour lifespan - approaching 6 years).

UPDATE - NOV 2011 - I've decided to re-rate these as 3 stars after three out of 8 bulbs have malfunctioned or blown since purchase. That simply isn't good enough for this price, although it's a given that this could be a power issue in the property we rent.


Thermometer-Hygrometer Instrument Room Control Anthrazit-White
Thermometer-Hygrometer Instrument Room Control Anthrazit-White
Offered by Wetterladen24
Price: £15.99

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Your doubts will evaporate, 13 Nov 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Great little humidity meter and digital thermometer that performs well. A little more than you'd pay for a basic model, but this features daily low and high recordings and the display is clear. We actually bought this for the humidity meter, but the digital thermometer agreed to within 0.3oC with another we had already in the house - giving confidence in its accuracy.

An unexpected bonus was the size - actually small enough that it (just) fitted through our letter-box, saving a trip to the Sorting Office!


Kidde 9CO-5UK Carbon Monoxide Detector (discontinued by manufacturer)
Kidde 9CO-5UK Carbon Monoxide Detector (discontinued by manufacturer)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too many false alarms, 8 Nov 2010
This carbon monoxide alarm didn't perform well for us.

First the positives - easy to set up, uses standard AA batteries, and a loud alarm that can probably be heard throughout the house.

However, after three false activations we've changed this model for one with a digital display for extra information about the level detected. Of course it's better to have a false alarm than a real one, but although an emergency engineer can do a basic safety check, an expensive call-out might be required to check gas appliances. And as you can't see, hear or smell carbon monoxide, leaving the house or opening all the windows in the middle of the night in winter is an inconvenience.

Note that this alarm is not recommended by the manufacturer as a smoke detector.


ProTemp S 100 W
ProTemp S 100 W

4.0 out of 5 stars Ideal for a small-to-medium size aquarium, 23 Oct 2010
This review is from: ProTemp S 100 W
This heater will warm a 50 - 150 litre tank, assuming it's located indoors. So far it's proved reliable, and a thermometer in our tank shows that the settings are accurate.

It was easy to set up and install, and the plastic safety cage will prevent thermal injury to your fish. It is quite unobtrusive, but struggles to fit vertically in our 40cm tall tank due to the size. At 100w rating, it is unlikely to give you a running cost over £5.00 per month (at 2010 prices), assuming that the heater is only on intermittently.

I'd recommend it.


Fluval U3 Underwater Filter 800LPH
Fluval U3 Underwater Filter 800LPH
Offered by aquacadabra
Price: £31.50

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Easy to use, 23 Oct 2010
This filter, suitable for aquariums 90 - 150 litres in size, is relatively quiet and easy-to-use. There are three types of filtration provided - granules in a central compartment give biological filtering, mechanical filtering is carried out by the sponge filters, and carbon cartridges will clarify the water and remove harmful chemicals. Note that the carbon will also remove some medications from the water, so be careful with a sick fish.

The price seems fair, although the recommended replacement rate for parts means buying new carbon cartridges every few weeks, foam pads every few months, and replacing a few of the granules every 6 months. Aquarists may argue over the necessity of such frequent changes, but this schedule is given in the instructions.

I found the filter easy to install on the side of our tank, and it can be set to provide either powerful surface agitation or more gentle flow in a planted tank. The noise level is hardly audible when, for example, a television is on as well.

Overall recommended, and a good choice for beginners like me.


The Perfect Aquarium: The Complete Guide to Setting Up and Maintaining an Aquarium
The Perfect Aquarium: The Complete Guide to Setting Up and Maintaining an Aquarium
by Jeremy Gay
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.49

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The perfect guide, 23 Oct 2010
This is an excellent book, and a great starting point that begins with the very basics. Step-by-step instructions with pictures take you through setting up a tank, and concise descriptions of technical topics like the nitrogen cycle and testing the water will help you avoid many of the mistakes that are often made when starting out in fishkeeping.

The 'Choosing the Fish' sections provide beatiful colour pictures to assist you in choosing your pets, and helpful information is provided in a text box (will it get on with the others already in the tank?). There's good coverage of saltwater, 'brackish', and freshwater tropical fish, and some advice on what to do if things go wrong. The text is well-laid out and readable.

This is the best book if its type I've read through, and comes recommended.


Freshwater Aquariums For Dummies
Freshwater Aquariums For Dummies
by Maddy Hargrove
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars There are better alternatives, 23 Oct 2010
This book didn't quite live up to my expectations. Although all the information you might need was right there, the relative lack of pictures or diagrams actually made some of the topics quite difficult. This is perhaps a general trend in the "for Dummies" series, but when selecting your fish for a new aquarium, or diagnosing a disease, I reckon that "a picture speaks a thousand words". After all, despite the technical knowledge required for fishkeeping, most people's excitement about starting a tank is choosing the colourful pets to go in it.

The do / don't sections are quite useful, and there's plenty of reading on chemistry and the nitrogen cycle. If you like a chatty style of writing rather than a simple encyclopaedia you'll like this book.

However, I much preferred The Perfect Aquarium: The Complete Guide to Setting Up and Maintaining an Aquarium for it's concise two-page spreads on particular topics, facts about each fish (e.g. what temperature they require), and practical walk-throughs for setting up a tank.


Road Atlas Australia (AA Road Atlas)
Road Atlas Australia (AA Road Atlas)
by AA Publishing
Edition: Paperback

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good map, reasonable price, 19 July 2010
Easily beats roadmaps from the standard Australian mappers. Users from Europe or North America will find the format unusual - with different scale representations of the same areas on consecutive pages - but Australia is mainly empty in the middle with large cities situated around the coast, so this approach makes much more sense. Aimed at both the urban and rural road traveller, useful information such as which roads are sealed and the location of petrol stations is included.

Not really useful as a street directory on a local level - so best used for state/interstate travel, or that big road trip of a lifetime.


Economics (2nd edition): Making sense of the Modern Economy (Economist Books)
Economics (2nd edition): Making sense of the Modern Economy (Economist Books)
by The Economist
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Out of date, but not outdated, 19 July 2010
I really enjoyed reading this book. A collection of articles from 'The Economist' magazine written before the 2006 publication date of the book, they predate the current economic crisis - and so the book is probably due for an update.

However, don't let this put you off a book that explodes the myth that 'no-one could have predicted' the subsequent demise of banks and the housing market. There isn't a neutral viewpoint - there are unapologetic arguments in favour of globalization, for example, but this is offered with data and expert opinion to back up the views expressed. And there is an acknowledgement that money and the markets do not always work to the benefit of everyone, and of the problems that capitalism has created.

2011 edition, please?


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