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Hrorvendel (Copenhagen, DK)

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"The Lurking Fear" and Other Stories (A Del Rey book)
"The Lurking Fear" and Other Stories (A Del Rey book)
by H. P. Lovecraft
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Unnameable and forbidden abominations, 21 July 2008
This is the first collection of Lovecraft I read, and it's still the most macabre, as it contains some of his earliest and most gruesome efforts. If you count the pages and divide by the frequency of shrieks emitted you'll probably get the highest screaming rate of any Lovecraft collection, from the extraordinary quality and magnitude of Denis Barry's desperate wails as he's turned into a frog (The Moon-Bog) to the frenzy of screaming of one descendant of a certain Innsmouth sea merchant as he sees a "shoggoth" for the first (but, it appears, not the last) time ...


I Feel Like I'm Fixin' to Die
I Feel Like I'm Fixin' to Die
Price: 8.41

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars War and Peace, 8 July 2008
Best psychedelic album ever made? I'd rather say, it's the best psychedelic concept album ever made, the concept being the interplay between war, peace, love and mind-expanding. Superbly, the opening Anti War Theme is followed by a question: Who Am I? Gradually, if the listener started out in anger and frustration over the Vietnam War, he and she will soon be led to other less grim perspectives. So if psychedelic albums are meant to guide the listener's mood in logic and aesthetic progression, this is the best, and the most positive, although Sgt. Pepper is also quite good in this respect.


The Morning of the Magicians (Mysteries of the Universe)
The Morning of the Magicians (Mysteries of the Universe)
by Louis Pauwels
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.49

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Original mind-changer, 23 Sep 2007
Remarkable work that came out in France in 1960, in Denmark 1963; I read it over and over again at the time though I understood little at the age of 14-16. The book contained, for the times, completely unheard-of concepts, one of them that the international emancipation and solidarity of the working classes were of little importance, something that had profound influence on my world view afterwards.

Taking another look at "Morning of the Magicians" - you'll find what the content is all about elsewhere - I think it still holds a position as the most important book of that remarkable decade, much more so than "Chariot of the Gods" by von Däniken or, in a completery different vein, Herbert Marcuse's "One Dimensional Man".

Heavily criticized for lack of source material, hard proof, empirical research, control of facts, footnotes and bibliography I think you could bear with that for sheer excitement and with some of the over-dramatizations or exaggerations. There's no denying that Louis Pauwells is a man of very grande gestures. For example: There's a dramatic reference in the part II dealing with Nazi occultism to a book by Jack Fishman: The Seven Men of Spandau. In reality, there is nothing unusual about this matter-of-fact description of the lives of Rudolf Hess a.o. in the Spandau Prison after World War II, once you consult the book referred to.

Another source pointed out by critics as receiving overdue sensationalist attention by the authors is Hermann Rauschning's "Talks with Hitler"; here I think the authors are justified, however, in their interpretation. Hermann Rauschning - describing Hitler as man going completely mad at times - could not just make up such extraordinary quotes by the Führer.

I think it comes out between the lines that Jacques Bergier is the more, so to speak, naive of the two, although he represents the scientist, and Louis Pauwells is the journalist - who in the following decades entered the scene of political debate by supporting the so-called New (e.g. no longer Marxist) Philosophers Glucksmann and Levi by far exceeding them in taking up Right positions - what a shock to realize he was no part of the 60's movement at all! Let History judge - and let it be known that there would have been no psychedelic etc. 1960's if not for this book!


The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories (Penguin Modern Classics)
The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories (Penguin Modern Classics)
by S. T. Joshi
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great varied collection, 19 July 2007
This collection contains some quite different stories, from Arthur Jermyn (of opening paragraph fame: Life is a hideous thing), The Picture in the House (takes place in a modest and quiet New England farm house, but the mere sight of such dwellings always fills the author with extraordinary horror), Herbert West (eventually torn to pieces by legions newly out of the tomb lead by a certain resurrected Thing waxen head in hand orchestrating the ceremonious clawing asunder of the mad scientist responsible for animating their corpses) to the excellent and really uncanny "Whisperer in Darkness" and the unbelievable "The Shadow over Innsmouth". Well worth it.


The Silmarillion
The Silmarillion
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.30

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Look below for more extensive reviews, 18 July 2007
This review is from: The Silmarillion (Paperback)
I wish to state here, briefly but earnestly, that this is the most important and impressive book I've read since, say, The Bible, Dante's Divine Comedy, the Aenid and, of course, Lord of the Rings, but this surpasses LOTR in some respects; a work of such profound and imponderable insights, I find it impossible to believe that there does not lie some universal educational motive, and, fantastic as it may be, a marvellous connection to some real, subconsciously remembered, prehistoric conditions and events on this planet behind presenting it to mankind.


Secret Places of the Lion
Secret Places of the Lion
by George Hunt Williamson
Edition: Paperback
Price: 12.39

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars UFO-classic of the 1950's, 18 July 2007
This is a must read - because it's one of the most unusual and strange books ever written, dealing with Ancient Egypt, the Bible, the time of Moses and, especially the Pharaoh Akhnaton, precessor of Tuth-Ankh-Amon, reincarnation - including a list of the former lives of a large number of personalities working for the spiritual world - and UFO's. It's extremely suggestive and convincing, but, all in all, the sources for all this sensational information are to be found in extraterrestrial contacts or in hints by "Those Who Know", without the slightest proof or research. It's a classic of UFO-literature out of the 1950's written by one who was a co-worker of George Adamski and even went on an European lecture tour, and, ever shrouded in mystery, clearly is identical to Brother Philip, author of "Secret of the Andes".


The Three Impostors
The Three Impostors
by Arthur Machen
Edition: Paperback

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The title to choose, 12 July 2007
This review is from: The Three Impostors (Paperback)
What makes this stand out among other Arthur Machen collections is that it's not a collection but an original work, entwining three stories together and it is, also, precisely the incidents that hold the stories together that are particularly evocative of undefineable horror. H.P. Lovecraft used "The Novel of the Black Seal" (The Whisperer in Darkness) and, especially, "The Novel of the White Powder" (The Thing on the Doorstep), as basic inspiration. The reaction to coming horror by the protagonists of Machen is, however, neither a frenzy of screaming nor seeking admittance, mercifully, to madness' ebony gates of oblivion, for they await their Doom with awful foreknowledge.


The Spirit Of Philadelphia Volume 1
The Spirit Of Philadelphia Volume 1
Offered by Fulfillment Express
Price: 10.92

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't pass this one by, 11 July 2007
A little too much on the disco side for my liking this is the still best ever compilation of lesser known tracks out of Philadelphia in the 1970's. "Stay With Me" by the Futures is one of the very best Gamble-Huff songs, from 1973, when this sound was at its creative height, it's got a great syncopated hookline (if you know what I mean ...) This compilation showcases much the string arrangements, ever simple and catchy, in contrast to the often absurdly contrived string arrangements of many other soul music productions incl. Motown. Bobby Martin and Thom Bell just don't know how to do anything wrong. This album features mostly their disciple-arrangers re-using some of the classic riffs to advantage.


The Templars' Secret Island: The Knights, The Priest And The Treasure
The Templars' Secret Island: The Knights, The Priest And The Treasure
by Henry Lincoln
Edition: Hardcover

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes, it truly was a great read, 31 Jan 2001
...even more convincing, less intricate and mysterious than the Rennes-le-Chateau story outlined in the author's (Lincoln) "Key to the Sacred Pattern". Most of these facts, including the two most important, The Templars in Denmark and the Baltic and the incredible accurateness of the placing of the four round churches on the isle of Bornholm, have, of course, been known to historians as well as land surveyers all along, but deliberately put down as romanticism and coincidence bad for the public's mental health. There is an obvious german link to the baltic crusades not gone into in this work, which has found a kind of norwegian counterpart in Harald Sommerstedt Boehlke's: The Norwegian Pentagram, published by Eutopia, Norway.


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