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Reviews Written by
Thomas Tinney "AZpir8King" (Hartford,WI USA)
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Nexus (Sontem Trilogy Book 1)
Nexus (Sontem Trilogy Book 1)
Price: £2.22

4.0 out of 5 stars A speedy ride with clever writing, 6 Jan. 2014
Science fiction and fantasy are usually considered water and oil as far as genre's go. Purists cringe easily when the two are combined. Technology should trump magic or vice versa. Well, in this case, the purists should just hush their mouths.

Colony Earth presents multiple intersecting plots, characters and worlds in a creative and interesting way. The author is able to twist together historical perspectives, technological marvels, political intrigue and a little "Clan of the cave bear meets Chariots of the Gods" in a varied palette of colors she uses to paint her canvas.

While she takes some license with the time scale and technology of the ages involved, the reader never feels lost or presented with an unbelievable reality. If you can accept the primary premise, you are "all-in" for the rest of the novel. I enjoyed the characters, their interactions, as well as the solutions they worked out to resolve their various conflicts and solve their mutual problems. The book is well-paced and the dialogue is witty and real.

It's a great first effort.

The author has created a universe that allows her to take this story deep into a series and I look forward to the next book.


Colony Earth (The Alterran Legacy Series, Book 1)
Colony Earth (The Alterran Legacy Series, Book 1)
Price: £0.99

4.0 out of 5 stars A great place to visit, 6 Jan. 2014
Science fiction and fantasy are usually considered water and oil as far as genre's go. Purists cringe easily when the two are combined. Technology should trump magic or vice versa. Well, in this case, the purists should just hush their mouths.

Colony Earth presents multiple intersecting plots, characters and worlds in a creative and interesting way. The author is able to twist together historical perspectives, technological marvels, political intrigue and a little "Clan of the cave bear meets Chariots of the Gods" in a varied palette of colors she uses to paint her canvas.

While she takes some license with the time scale and technology of the ages involved, the reader never feels lost or presented with an unbelievable reality. If you can accept the primary premise, you are "all-in" for the rest of the novel. I enjoyed the characters, their interactions, as well as the solutions they worked out to resolve their various conflicts and solve their mutual problems. The book is well-paced and the dialogue is witty and real.

It's a great first effort.

The author has created a universe that allows her to take this story deep into a series and I look forward to the next book.


Crash Landing: Aurora Conspiracy Prequel Series - Episode 1
Crash Landing: Aurora Conspiracy Prequel Series - Episode 1

5.0 out of 5 stars In the Blink of an Eye, 6 Jan. 2014
In the blink of an eye...

I know when I picked up Aurora Conspiracy: Crash landing, that it was a short book and part of the series. I started reading, turning pages as the story zipped ahead and then I was turning the last page. Like a chocolate brownie covered with ice cream, I got to the bottom of the bowl and was left to ponder where all of that good stuff had gone so quickly.

The premise is an interesting one. A futuristic alien, with human qualities, has a mishap while time traveling and ends up stuck in the late 1800's. The Author set the stage to make these two interesting worlds collide: time traveling advanced species and a generation of Americans that were self sufficient, resourceful, tough and looking at a new century just around the corner. The story was face paced and entertaining, although the characters were a little naive and maybe to open to an alien in their midst (I have seen things pop out of peoples stomachs, so I would be somewhat reserved when talking to someone who fell from the sky).

The book is only 8 chapters, so there was not a lot of material to develop characters and back story, but I am going to assume that occurs over the length of the series. The glimpses we see of the characters makeup and history in the book is credible and interesting. It was slightly rushed, but the conclusion was sound and left me wanting to read further into the series.

You won't be disappointed.


Passive Income for Life [A Proven Blueprint for Financial Freedom]: A Time-Tested Secret Recipe for Building a $50,000 Cash Machine Selling on Amazon ...In Your Spare Time (Almost Free Money)
Passive Income for Life [A Proven Blueprint for Financial Freedom]: A Time-Tested Secret Recipe for Building a $50,000 Cash Machine Selling on Amazon ...In Your Spare Time (Almost Free Money)
Price: £2.32

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Handy guide for self Starter, 6 Jan. 2014
I had no idea that selling online could be tackled in a coherent and straight ahead fashion.

Having heard stories from "I made it big" to "I lost it all" for novice Internet sellers using Ebay and Craigslist, I have always been wary of over-hype for online business opportunities (and books about them). I recently opened my first createspace store for my book through Amazon and it seems easy enough...although I am not retiring quite yet..

The big takeaway from "Passive Income for Life"is the idea that you can inventory items of interest without a business/store front or paid for storage space, turning a hobby into a home based business with a small investment. It is work. I can see that, and the author highlights that he was "Lucky" in some respects relative to found inventory and turnaround profits, but the principle looks sound.

This is not a step by step path to a million dollars book, but a guide that points you to the resources you need to start your business and what pitfalls to avoid. The title is not exactly accurate.."Passive income" is being generous. You will need to work quite a bit, but the marketing machine of Amazon will take up the sales aspect that many of us are not familiar with, nor have the savvy to exploit. You will need to become an expert in certain aspects of the method and system that Amazon utilizes, but the book points you to the things you need to review, learn and live. The book is almost an "Amazon selling for Dummies" without the derogatory overtones. I liked it.

The author focuses on books, CD's and collectables as his examples, but I would have liked to have seen a take on other items that sell "used" through the Amazon site.


Beneath the Willow
Beneath the Willow
Price: £0.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read., 6 Jan. 2014
I enjoyed this short read immensely. We follow a flawed and torn character as his normal life is waylaid by supernatural forces and he must face the tragic loss of his true love .

The author explores the depths of commitment we have for our loved ones, in life and beyond. And that there might be consequences for broken promises that go well beyond hurt feelings and the silent treatment.

The characters and world are well written. The author "reveals" the past as the present unfolds and the reader is along for an interesting ride. Twilight this is not (thankfully).

I look forward to more short stories and an extended endeavor from this author.


Place of Many Birds: Australian Stories
Place of Many Birds: Australian Stories
Price: £1.97

4.0 out of 5 stars One the edge of something..., 6 Jan. 2014
Place of many birds puts the reader in the author's concept of Australia circa late 40's to early 60's. With the exception habitual reliance on run on sentences, I found the characters believable, the interactions appropriate and the settings distinct. It was an easy read.

But I kept waiting for a moment, scene or circumstance to draw me into the world, rather than just observe it. The stories did not excite me, depress me or involve me. They were not bad, but they are plain. The author is talented and vivid in her descriptions, but she would have been served by more plot in each story. I kept waiting for a "Stand by Me" or "To kill a mockingbird" moment that would lend some sort of relevance to the story. Something that would make it more than a diary of observation, but in the end, it was not to be.

I hope the author takes her talents, along with her love for the time and place, and tells me a story of the people she shows me. Not just the who, when and where...but the why and the why not.


Black Redneck vs. Space Zombies (A Black Redneck Adventure Book 1)
Black Redneck vs. Space Zombies (A Black Redneck Adventure Book 1)
Price: £2.30

5.0 out of 5 stars Where's my Popcorn and $6 soda?, 6 Jan. 2014
While the title may put you off, once you start reading, you won't put it down. In our PC world, a title that starts "Black Redneck" might make you wary, but don't be. If you enjoy, and I do, 40's, 50's or 60's "B" Sci-Fi movies ("Them!", "Forbidden Planet", "The Thing From Another World", etc) you will enjoy "Black Redneck Vs Space Zombies". The pace is quick, the characters crisp and the premise is made for a Saturday morning matinee, popcorn and red vines in hand.

We follow Jefferson Balladeer as he comes home to administer the family estate and deal with his past. He is a Sci-Fi writer that finds out it is more fun to write it, than live it. No spoilers in this review, but definitely fun to read how he deals with family, friends, enemies and alien face munchers.

Some of the other characters can be somewhat predictable, cliché's, but the interactions are entertaining, and sometimes we need a little cliché in our matinee. The southern feel of the book is genuine and "Mary" is priceless, with her homespun perspective on people and no-nonsense approach to alien interaction. The conversations are up to date and in your face at the right time, but there is a homey feel to the location and people created in the book.

In a good Sci-Fi matinee, we have to believe the unbelievable, but not be told that is what we are being asked to do. Does that make sense? Well, this book succeeds at that. No long technical explanations about widgets working with flux capacitors, just Aliens, Spaceships, Zombies, Cowboys, Guns, Beer, Flatscreens and pretty southern gals...that can shoot. And a horse.

If you are even remotely interested in Sci-Fi, or enjoy old Sci-Fi movies, you need to put some time aside and read this book. Kudos to Stephen Roy for some great work.


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