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M. A. Jones (Notts)
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Caesars Legion: The Epic Saga of Julius Caesar's Elite Tenth Legion and the Armies of Rome
Caesars Legion: The Epic Saga of Julius Caesar's Elite Tenth Legion and the Armies of Rome
by Stephen Dando-Collins
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

1.0 out of 5 stars Claptrap and a Handful of Rubbish, 22 Nov. 2013
I was given this book as a present by someone who wanted to say thank you for help that I had given, knowing that I am very interested in Roman history. How on earth I will answer when I am asked if I enjoyed it I do not know. Others giving poor ratings have spelled out many of the errors, not all, but many. I agree with them and the doubts expressed as to Dando Collins' having ever done any research at all. As I read I became more and more exasperated, what on earth were the publishers doing to publish such claptrap? Including the appendices there are three hundred pages; I got as far as page 140 and gave up.
If you have read much about the 1st Century BCE you will have come across one senator called Lentulus Spinter. At the top of page i40 we find Pompey "having sent Generals Lentulus and Spinter to Rhodes....." and I gave up! But it made me wonder about the author.
Dando Collins I decided, either knows nothing at all about what he is writing or he set out to prove that armed with schoolboy history anyone can write a historical treatise.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 9, 2014 8:17 PM BST


The Strangest Man: The hidden Life of Paul Dirac, Quantum Genius
The Strangest Man: The hidden Life of Paul Dirac, Quantum Genius
by Graham Farmelo
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Biography of a Genius, 22 Dec. 2011
When, by chance, I saw this book for sale, I recalled reading the eulogy by Stephen Hawking when a plaque, commemorating Dirac, was placed in Westminster Abbey. I couldn't believe that I knew nothing about him; so I bought the book. It is a biography of the highest order. I found it gripping and detailed and at the end I came to the conclusion that he may have had Asperger's Syndrome and perhaps focused on his maths rather than communicating with the wider public through the media as we have become used to the likes of Hawking, Richard Dawkins and Brian Cox doing.But that is just my opinion. Whatever his motivation, he helped to change our world and we are indebted to Graham Farmelo for the care that he has taken in writing this biography. I think it is superb.

I might add that rather than loan it to friends, I have bought two further copies as Christmas presents!


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