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Bugs "buggle26" (Arklow, Ireland)

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Antarctica: An Intimate Portrait of the World's Most Mysterious Continent
Antarctica: An Intimate Portrait of the World's Most Mysterious Continent
by Gabrielle Walker
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

4.0 out of 5 stars A Bit Too Intimate..., 23 Feb 2014
...In the sense that it would appeal more to family members and the people she encountered in Antarctica. However I did enjoy this quirky collection of sketches of the Southern Continent. There is oodles of information, historical and present, to titillate anyone interested in Antarctica. The writing is clear and jaunty. I read it daily in small bursts and had no bother finishing it. It is a cut above other travelogue books and I can well see myself dipping in again in the future.


Kill as Few Patients as Possible: And Fifty-six Other Essays on How to Be the World's Best Doctor
Kill as Few Patients as Possible: And Fifty-six Other Essays on How to Be the World's Best Doctor
by Oscar London
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 11.35

5.0 out of 5 stars GP Trainee alert. READ!!!!, 4 Dec 2013
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A fun read for medics! I am now 31 years qualified and still enjoy the short
vignettes he describes. I buy each of my registrars a copy before they leave,
after their year with me. Short chapters with a message. Addictive reading.


Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human
Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human
by Richard Wrangham
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, readable hypothesis!, 20 Aug 2013
Other reviewers have described the content so I will not go over the same ground. The ideas and reasoning are first class. I was astounded. It compares to "Guns, Germs and Steel" in its originality and cogently arranged arguments. This, in my opinion, makes the book an important and essential study for those who wish to learn about our beginnings as humans. It is a truly readable book, short and pacy enough to read on holidays!


The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason
The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason
by Sam Harris
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't try to climb Mt Impossible!, 15 Aug 2010
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Finding it very difficult to believe in God for some years now, I have read many books that purport to disprove its existence. To be fair I have read others that do the opposite. Despite the multitudinous assertions/proofs of the atheists, not one has "proved" the fairy-tale thesis. Harris, in this book, has produced the most cogent, coherent and apposite demolition of liberal approaches to religion. He does not hate as Dawkins does, or sneer like Hitchens. He absolutely refutes the idea of a Creator, but does not attempt to make science or reason disprove one. It seems that he has realised God and Schrodinger's cat are equivalent at this point in time. He makes extremely valid and vital observations about the current state of religions and how the various strands are likely to cause untold misery, if not disaster. His stance is more powerful than the absolutist position. His purpose is to explain that all isms are false and so non-compatable that reconciliation is impossible unless mankind abjures the "Books" that were inspired by God. I feel his view is right: remember one can't disprove God however grotesque it may be to be a non-believer. The book is worthy even if one reads merely the first paragraph; it is something to be related in any discussion of God! This book is valuable and has none of "The Dawkins' Delusion". It is the most illuminative and enjoyable book of its genre that I have read. It is also well written, easily absorbed by a layman(!) and, ultimately, comprhensible. A caveat; it is particularly harsh on Islam, not usual in other books which tend to harp on against Christianity, that being the safest bet. Highly recommended.


Victor Mollo's Bridge Club
Victor Mollo's Bridge Club
by Victor Mollo
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.74

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, even for a Toucan or Walrus!, 16 Mar 2010
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This is the most imaginative, insightful and hilarious bridge book I have read. It and its successors are famous and I am surprised there are no prior reviews. Each animal represents a true type of player. Super/Boastful, Great/Unlucky, Bad/Lucky and Brutal/Unlucky are all shown here. The hands are well described and the proper management of the cards is explained. I laughed out loud reading this repeatedly, as others to whom I have given it as a gift. I am a very moderate player but have learnt a good amount. An absolute 100% smash guaranteed.


AK47: The Story of the People's Gun
AK47: The Story of the People's Gun
by Michael Hodges
Edition: Paperback

0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Amateurish schoolboy rubbish., 16 Mar 2010
This should never have been printed. I thought it would give insights to the gun, its battles and symbolism. Score nil on all counts. His interviews with Kalashnikov reveal nothing about the inventor other than hagiographical platitudes. The book appears to have been tossed off by a lazy undergraduate doing his cute first year project. I could not believe there was not one picture or drawing of the eponymous assault rifle or even the inventor. The stories are second-hand bragging. The Vietnam one had close to zero dealing with the rifle. Wikipedia would provide more detail and better prose. On the credit side this waste of currency can be flipped through in jig time. Avoid even if given as a present.


The Wasp Factory
The Wasp Factory
by Iain Banks
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not sure., 7 Nov 2009
This review is from: The Wasp Factory (Paperback)
Rave reviews, five stars mostly and a famous author! Surely a cracker. Not really. I found it gripping at times, often funny, sporadically disgusting and eloquently written, but there was always a niggling doubt that this is a great book. The ending, which I was hoping to come soon and demonstrate what the message was, did not really shed any light on the purpose of the preceding pages. Does the book imply that madness and sickness travel down the genes? If so, this book does not go to the trouble of explaining its case. Perhaps Banks is trying to say that trauma to the body breeds depravity. Again there is no thesis for this opinion. I do agree with an earlier reviewer that Banks's idea is good but he did not think it through. What I was left with was a litany of tortures, insanity and weirdness. It is not a surreal work of art. I would not dismiss it entirely, but read it just to confirm the unctuous and kowtowing nature of critics; the professional ones, not the reviewers on Amazon! A moderate work at best. I also think that the young 16yr Amazon reviewer is spot on. This does not deserve a place on any curriciculum of English literature. This is not in the same class as Clockwork Orange and never will be.


A Brief History of the End of the World
A Brief History of the End of the World
by Simon Pearson
Edition: Paperback

2.0 out of 5 stars Bloody Hell. End it now!, 8 Sep 2009
A great idea but poorly constructed, repetitious and quite frankly vacuous. The writing and thinking seem strained. It seems that the author felt obliged to fill 290 pages. The research, going by the index and references, is voluminous but the narrative is dull. By midway I did not care if the world ended immediately. I also deplore the use of pretentious words and phrases, which abound. Avoid.


A Guide to the Birds of East Africa
A Guide to the Birds of East Africa
by Nicholas Drayson
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A merry little conceit!, 8 Sep 2009
I bought this on a whim. It is charming, funny and interesting. The chapters are short and pithy, with intriguing illustrations. Human feelings of love, regret, sadness, insecurity, bravado and duty interact throughout. You sympathise with the hero yet his nemesis is likeable. Really worth a read. My family have taken it to heart. Better than McCall Smith!


The Stars: A New Way to See Them
The Stars: A New Way to See Them
by H. A. Rey
Edition: Paperback
Price: 7.83

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How the ancients really saw the stars!, 9 Jan 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Every year I buy this remarkable book for presents. Nobody has been disappointed. With it everyone can see the constellations, as I am sure ancient people originally did. The diagrams and accompanying text are brilliantly concise and stimulating. It certainly inspired me to look up at night, for over thirty years. Incredibly original. A classic.


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