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The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson (Zero Books)
The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson (Zero Books)
by Mark Fisher
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

16 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hard to imagine a better book on Jackson, 1 Dec. 2009
I have not been a fan of Michael Jackson, let me say. Yet this fabulous book inspired me to listen more closely to at least a handful of his songs from the fresh, stimulating and provocative 'points of audition' it contains. And, lo and behold, they sprang to life in all their jouissance. This is not a book that will pin Jackson down for you. It does quite different and much more interesting things. It is a book about masks and simulacra in the context of the global culture industry. It is another great entry to the list of amazing books that Zero have put out this year (see also 'Capitalist Realism' by Mark Fisher, 'Cold World' by Dominic Fox, 'Militant Modernism' by Owen Hatherley, 'Fear of Music' by David Stubbs, the novel 'Picture of Contented Wealth').


21st Century Man "Limited 2CD"
21st Century Man "Limited 2CD"

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Underwhelming, 12 Nov. 2009
I agree with the 'Middling' review. I've only fairly recently gotten into Luke Haines - I checked out 'After Murder Park' because of David Peace's recommendation in an interview and think it's tremendous. Much of his other work is also really interesting, quirky, insightful, good tunes, etc. The last one, 'Off My Rocker', was notable for 'Leeds Utd' and one or two other tracks, but showed clear signs of evaporating energy. This new one is really underwhelming, can scarcely be bothered with it. Lyrical observations are not particularly gemlike. Give me Mark E Smith's '50 Year Old Man' anyday over the whine of '21st Century Man'. The spoken word thing, 'Great Brain Robbery', on the bonus disc, is just tedious. Oh dear.


The Picture of Contented New Wealth: a Metaphysical Horror (Zero Books)
The Picture of Contented New Wealth: a Metaphysical Horror (Zero Books)
by Tariq Goddard
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Van Greenway, R. Corman, M.R.James, live on, live on..., 5 Oct. 2009
I read this swiftly, in two sittings. Highly enjoyable stuff, tongue slipping into cheek somewhat in certain parts. The lyrics of Mark E. Smith (The Fall), notably from 'Spectre Vs. Rector', intrude occasionally. Indeed, the novel takes its point of departure from this song. Yuppies, migrating from the city into the isolated Tyger Tyger House - one of the great haunted houses of supernatural fiction, surely - encounter a fascinating and seductive demonic power. The spectre takes possession of the woman of the house, Brigit, apparently having opened her up to its influence years prior through the medium of Deleuzian theory (brilliant!!!) and the only hope lies with The Rector ('came from the hills-ah!'). Highly recommended. Sludge Hai Choi!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 12, 2013 7:30 PM BST


Hammer and Beyond: British Horror Film
Hammer and Beyond: British Horror Film
by Peter Hutchings
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Actually an astute and engrossing discussion of British horror cinema, 5 Nov. 2008
Those who have previously commented on this book have been unfair. This book is not a coffee table volume - it seeks to contextualize British horror cinema in terms of troubled notions of masculinity, etc. It does not fall prey to the 'reflectionist' trap in which movies are seen simply as reflecting their social context and is particularly strong in its sensitivity towards the imaginative ways in which specific films interrogate their context. Whilst it's possible to quibble with some interpretive claims, analyses of films from 'Dead of Night' onwards are always astute and engrossing. Worthwhile for any scholar/student of British horror.


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