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N. Wistreich "Nicol" (Glasgow, UK)
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The Wicker Man: Conversations with Robin Hardy, Anthony Shaffer & Edward Woodward
The Wicker Man: Conversations with Robin Hardy, Anthony Shaffer & Edward Woodward
Price: £1.95

4.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating read, 19 July 2012
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One of the best film interviewers around pulls together years of conversations with Hardy, Shaffer and Woodward to create a fascinating insight behind the making and thinking behind The Wicker Man - as well as the distributor's reaction when they finally saw it.


Life Inc: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take it Back: How We Traded Meaning for Markets, Society for Self-interest, and Citizenship for Customer Service
Life Inc: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take it Back: How We Traded Meaning for Markets, Society for Self-interest, and Citizenship for Customer Service
by Douglas Rushkoff
Edition: Paperback

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Long overdue, 13 July 2009
The first point to note is that Rushkoff isn't attacking money or trade in itself: "Commerce is good" he says, "Corporatism is something else entirely". Tracing corporations back to the monarchy, and showing them as an extension of the same power-hungry, oft-corrupt idealogoy, Rushkoff explores the same territory as Joel Bakan's The Corporation and the Yes Men's stunts and films. But it's a vital and urgent issue: how centuries of corporate influence have turned us into a world of "isolated, individualistic people pitted against each other" at a time when cooperation is more urgently needed than ever.

It seems a vital debate as the big three problems of the modern world - poverty (and related conflicts), global warming and lifestyle/mental health problems, are linked in a vicious circle supported by corporations so massive and far removed from their original purpose as to have forgotten making money is far less important than (and often inversely related to) wellbeing and survival. Lives of unfulfilling, unproductive work that we don't believe in making us miserable, forcing us to buy more stuff we don't need made by cheap, exploited foreign labour, in turn using up valuable resources and bringing the planet closer to enviro-catastrophe. It's a circle where no-one benefits other than a few large shareholders, and even they are endangering their own heirs - a non-Darwinian illogicality.

As is often the case, the problems seem to be spelled out here in far more detail than the solutions, but there is the general argument in favour of the group over the individual, interdependence, collective action as well as small scale thinking and personal life changes. There is, however, a strong warning against 'branded movements', the corporate/institutional solution and Bono-esque save-the-world "ego trips" that "are the artifacts of the strident individualism we were taught to embrace".

Essential reading, even if you don't agree with everything within it.


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