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Around the World in 80 Days: English & French
Around the World in 80 Days: English & French
Price: £0.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Riveting Read - Easy Learning., 15 Oct. 2014
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Pretty soon after your French Primer, you can read/ study this with very great pleasure, for this simplified dual-language book by 2Language Books is a terrific story with lots of dramatic incident missing from the various films, particulary the saving of Mrs Aouda from being burnt alive with her Maharaja-husband's corpse. She is rescued by Passepartout and Phileas Fogg and, after many shared cliff-hangers, she marries the impurtable Foggy Front. There is a good deal of travel vocabulary, especially oceanic. It is, of course, an abridged version of Verne's book, but the chief translator, Nik Marcel, excels: when I got the end of the French-English story, I was confronted with three more versions - French to English, French alone, and English alone. And all for 77pence! 2Language Books have published other dual-language books and a French Grammar, also inexpensive. I found this book an absolute joy - when one is learning one has a right to feel virtuous! Strongly recommended.


Times Jumbo Cryptic Crossword 11: The world's most challenging cryptic crossword (Crosswords)
Times Jumbo Cryptic Crossword 11: The world's most challenging cryptic crossword (Crosswords)
by The Times Mind Games
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Jeremiad, 14 Sept. 2014
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In my view it is not a proper Jumbo, only 23 x 23 and not 27 x 27 which is the real Daddy Jumbo. They are still quite good though the print looks a bit cheapskate. The reason one doesn't see larger Jumbos is that there is a clever - but expensive - computer program (one can buy) with grids up to 23 x 23 with which one gets the grid and on pressing Return the grid is filled. You can imagine how much quicker it is to produce such a cryptic. Also, if, for example, a corner of it is too erudite (eg, scientific uses), one can delete and by Return get another sample for the corner. This is why one does not find proper Jumbos (27 x 27), but it does not mean that cryptics of even minimum grid (15 x15 ) cannot be very enjoyable but there are never enough with four 15-letter answers (particularly perimeter 15s). One has to be flexible and realise that clueing a cryptic is not easy but, my opiniion is that setters should never be pedantic (with very tenuous links), unless the crossword is famed for its pedantry. An example is furnished by 1. Across of this week's Sunday Times 23 x 23: "Twenty-eight countries, typically crude oil producers" (9). My assist is: the anagram indicator (mixer) is deliciously clever, though it opens with pedantry. I suppose we should thank the Times for producing a 23 x 23, but they really should eschew the pedantry.


Sennheiser HD 202 Closed Back On-Ear Stereo Headphone
Sennheiser HD 202 Closed Back On-Ear Stereo Headphone
Price: £28.80

5.0 out of 5 stars Good Product, 12 Sept. 2014
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Very good value indeed. Well designed too, for if you tangle your feet in the leads and discover your earpieces have come adrift, it is relatively easy to fit them back in their grooves, leaving you to appreciate their durability. The sound quality is very good and much ambient noise excluded. I am happy to use mine mosts of the time, for I find that TV dialogue - often garbled or rushed by poor-speaking actors - is better defined. Orchestral music is more of a test, but still, the headphones remain adequate.


Times Cryptic Crossword Book 14: 80 of the world's most famous crossword puzzles
Times Cryptic Crossword Book 14: 80 of the world's most famous crossword puzzles
by The Times Mind Games
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Cryptic Comparison, 12 Sept. 2014
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After sampling the Daily Telegraph's cryptic crosswords, I now realise that printing of the Times crossword books is inferior (elderly eyes have difficulty with numbers in the grid). There is no such cheapskate printing in the DT books. Although the wit and subtlety of both are equal, I detect a greater absence of the pretentious clue in the DT. The Times setters are too often eruditely difficult with links that scarcely hold up. Perhaps a bit of a quibble, but not if you are trying to fill the grid while commuting to work. Setters should always remember that users are extremely time-stressed and REALLY appreciate wit and acumen when divorced from intellectual affectation.


Delphi Complete Works of Henry James (Illustrated)
Delphi Complete Works of Henry James (Illustrated)
Price: £1.83

5.0 out of 5 stars Educational Reading, 12 Sept. 2014
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Although I can't feel passionate about HJ, I like him, chiefly because he introduces one to fresh vocabulary, including European languages. The endings of his novels are often indeterminate, probably the result of a passive nature. Even so, his characters are interesting, and his uper-class milieux dominated by repressive propriety. If you have an ambition to write, HJ's disciplined writing would benefit you without overwhelming you for, whatever aridity you find in him, he will leave you strangely enhanced for the scribblers' trade.


Samsung Chromebook XE303C12-A01UK 11.6-inch Laptop (2GB RAM, 16GB HDD)
Samsung Chromebook XE303C12-A01UK 11.6-inch Laptop (2GB RAM, 16GB HDD)

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I have a hunch that it will be a super device, if I can avoid LARGE FILES which ..., 12 Sept. 2014
It is probably worth five stars, but I'm still trying to familiarize myself with its many difficulties. The whizz son of a friend has connected the machine to my desktop's CLOUD so that my files are transferred to the Chrome together with Microsoft Word which can thus be used 'on line'. My work done on the Chrome can then be transferred to my desktop. I don't pretend to understand it, but when I do, I have a hunch that it will be a super device, if I can avoid LARGE FILES which it does not like. It is this limitation that has held me up. I have taped over the keypad and installed a mouse; but I am not at all sure that it is working properly. So, where am I? In a blanking CLOUD, ready for sentimental novels and the moody food of love. Perhaps I should have waited before rating it, but it loads up very fast, and it has great potential, which I hope I can understand - at least by Christmas 2015!


Daily Telegraph Big Book of Cryptic Crosswords 16: Bk. 16
Daily Telegraph Big Book of Cryptic Crosswords 16: Bk. 16
by Telegraph Group Limited
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Peerless, 26 May 2014
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I'm pleased to say that this DT volume knocks the spots off The Times crossword books which are cheapskate in comparison. What a joy to be able to read the numbers clearly! Excellently produced and lacking in nothing. Recommended.


Let Shakspere Die!: Long Live the Merry Madcap Lord Roger Manner, 5th Earl of Rutland the REAL "Shakespeare"
Let Shakspere Die!: Long Live the Merry Madcap Lord Roger Manner, 5th Earl of Rutland the REAL "Shakespeare"
by Brian Dutton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £22.08

5.0 out of 5 stars Augment to John, 4 May 2014
Augment to John
By Brian Dutton, the author of the book awarded 5 stars (below) by John ("John 75222"). I have awarded myself 5 stars although - constrained by neglect to be my own advocate (more below) - I would accord it a galaxy of stars, for only I am au fait with its brilliance. and what it has cost me. But, no more of that. It is very good of John, whom I met recently, to be so appreciative. As my work has been ignored by literary critics, his enthusiasm for my book has lifted my gloom more than somewhat. Thank you John. My intention here is to provide you, the general reader - anterior to your possible purchase of my book (and, hopefully, the second volume) - with a conspectus of my evidential proofs of Lord Rutland's authorship of the literary canon mistakenly ascribed to William Shakspere, the Stratford ignoramus who was unable to produce a coherent signature. His father signed with a mark - that is, an `X' - and William's children were illiterate. Would the real writer of the canon (Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland, 1576-1612), one of the best-educated men of his time, have scanted the education of his children?
The gist of what you need to know of Lord Rutland's prime motivation for writing the Sonnets is that at puberty he discovered that he was afflicted with erectile disorder (he couldn't achieve a penile erection). Almost immediately, at age 13, his best friend, Henry Wriothesley (pronounced Rosely or Risley), 3rd Earl of Southampton (at the time bisexual), seduced him (LS, buck, our poet, LR, doe). Thus, in bewilderingly short time, LR travelled from despair to euphoria, realising that sexual pleasure was not completely denied him, even though he was still unable to experience a penile orgasm. The evidence of the Sonnets - it must be faced head-on - is that he found his satisfaction in an anal emission, causing him profound shame; and, hence, this cathartic, cryptic, private diary, which never he intended to publish (when they were pirated and published he used his influence to have them called in). His Sonnets comprise a private diary of his personal Treatment Plan - by cathartic laughter (risotherapy: Latin 'risere' to laugh), effected by his peerless wit, adolescent rambunctiousnesss, and his immense courage in fearing nothing human, to assuage the torment of mental suffering.
For example, sonnet 65, ostensibly lauding the immortality of love-through-verse, but cryptically (covertly) uproariously describing a tit-ride, the cryptics expressed in 'all' (penis: phonetic `awl' a penetrating instrument) in `mor...tity', of the plain-text word, `mortallity'). Later in the poem he interpolates two witty anagrams - `tit-schemes' (line 10) from `Times chest', and `off-tits woe' (line 11) from `swift foote', strongly suggesting that he read some of his sonnets as Puzzle Poems to a coterie of responsive friends, whose exchanges would have greatly ameliorated his acute psychological distress. He ends the poem with a bawdy, cryptic envoi, for line 14's `That in black inck my love may still shine bright' translates: `That in back Clink (anagram of `black inck': the Clink a 16c prison in Southwark) my lover's cock may still prove active up my cooch (from `my love may still shine bright', for love, shine and bright have cryptic extensions throughout the Sonnets)'. One must admire his intrepid defiance of a malign fortune
It is intersting that LR's first lover, the EoS, has - according to our poet - a commendable joystick, while a later lover, King James the First, also the victim of malign Fortune, possessed but a wee-bitty penis. So, we have a limp penis, a whopper, and a cocklet: extremeties that LR cannot resist burlesquing, including his own deficiency. Typically - like Chaucer, often adolescent - LR burlesques both the King and LS in several sonnets: e.g. s.10.1-4 (LS the butt): `For shame deny that thou bear'st love to any [carries thy exposed pego to any man or woman],/ Who for thy selfe art so unprovident [anagrams `driven to pun'],/ Graunt if thou wilt [thy cock detumesce: the pun immediately appearing], thou art belov'd of many,/ But that thou none (= nought/ O /orifice) lov'st is most evident (thy profligate rod still pronged)'. His motive is adolescent fun, but the cryptic control -with overarching wit - is masterly, especially for a lad of 13. We know his age for he and LS had the same birthday, 6 October, though his friend was 3 years his senior; and as the first 17 sonnets were a birthday gift from LR to LS, when the latter became 17, our poet was celebrating his 14th, and hence he must have written them at age 13.
LR first met James Stuart (King James 6th of Scotland) when that monarch stopped off at Belvoir Castle, our poet's pad in Rutland, on his way south to become King James 1 of England; and our egregious poet is very quick in penning a sonnet of deferential restraint - hemmed in by a legal framework - but surprises with an arresting envoi, for he has discovered, 'de nuit', that the Scottish King's penis is too small to work an adequate frig, ending s.87: `Thus have I had thee as a dream doth flatter,/ In sleep a King, but waking no such matter', where `such matter' anagrams `rectum hast [a common contemporary spelling of `haste']': i.e. `I shall be in no great haste to take Your Majesty's wee-bitty rod up my cooch again'. But he certainly did, for he writes some dozen burlesquing sonnets with the same daring theme. LR's facetious wit, couched in semantic virtuosity, is epitomized in line 11 of s.64: `Ruine hath taught me thus to ruminate', where `ruine' expresses our poet's chagrin not only at the King's tichy presence in his culo but also in its premature exit, leaving him to rue - sorrow for - his `nate' (usually buttocks (nates), but here anus)'. Probably the wittiest encryption in all literature: certainly with claims of the most hilarious.
You will notice that I have not discussed John's review. I believe, you see, that he did not wish to steal my thunder by presenting any of my evidential proofs of R's authorship. As my book (published - at my expense - by Rosedog Books in Philadelphia in 2008) got under the radar; and as I sent copies to several Orthodox scholars who deigned me no reply (their mumchance modesty not at all surprising); and as I have cancer (prostate) and now a heart condition (the Grim Reaper's snickers becoming more audible), John's 5-star appreciation is a terrific tonic. In 2008, ill with exhaustion (ensconced in the madhouse at Moxton), I did try mainstream publishers, hopeful, despite the book's lack of an Index - I actually thought - given its sensational, manifest proofs of LR's authorship, and the avid international interest in the subject - they would be pleased to produce one. But no: I should have known, for Shakespeare is a big industry (as hidebound as Big Tobacco, whose 7 CEOs declared under oath in Congress: `I do not believe that nicotine is addictive', when they had, in fact, added ammonia to make cigarettes more addictive).
I had written articles of my proofs and sent them to the prestigious Shakespeare Quarterly. Here is a summary of one, entitled 'But Me No Buts'. LR concludes s.136.13-14: `Make but my name thy love, and love that still,/ And then thou lovest me for my name is 'Will''. The `but' of `Make but my name' = phonetic `butt', and 'OED' (the multi-volume edition of the Oxford Dictionary) provides butt n .6.1: `One of the parallel divisions of a ploughed field contained between two parallel furrows (`furrow' = `rut', OED 4a.), called also a rig, land, selion'. Hence, rut + land = Rutland (his titular name). The injunction, `Make but [into] my name' is clear - the covert couplet expressing: `Make but into my name, and love that still,/ And then thou lovest me for my name/ moniker/ nickname is 'Will'' [there is evidence in Spenser of Rutland's 'Will' moniker]. The `but' usage is again found in s.42.13-14, where overtly he concludes: `... she loves but me alone', which translates, 'Rutland (but) one lame (anagram of 'me alone', LR poignanly joking about his sexual `lameness'). A certain Thomas Powell pens a brief tribute to LS (hoping for patronage no doubt), referring to LR as `But traytor...'. During the trials following the Essex Revolt, LR's written `evidence' (he had been threatened with execution) was presented to the court, proving prejudicial to some conspirators, including LS, although, such his semantic subtlety, he is likely to have amnestied the complotters and burlesqued the Prosecution. Beneath the wall-monument to Shakspere in Holy Trinity Church, Stratford, appears a couple of lines of abstruse Latin, followed by three pentameter couplets, also deliberately convoluted. Its last `but' usage is found in the wall-monument text, concluding: ALL, YT (that) HE HATH WRITT,/ LEAVES LIVING ART, BUT PAGE, TO SERVE HIS WITT. The medial, BUT PAGE, is a notable anomaly never before adequately explained. Clearly, however, it means: `Rutland (cryptic 'but'), a record (a page of text, as found here, covertly establishing Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland, as the real author of the literary canon (LIVING ART) ascribed to Shakspere, the Stratfordian'. The writer of this wall-monument (probably Ben Jonson) answers his own tart, hortatory, READ IF THOU CANST, with a riposte for posterity in the concluding covert text memorialising Roger Manners, our beloved poet. The secretary of the 'SQ' rejected my articles with: `Our Editorial Board has recommended against publication of your essays, Aristo Strife and Further to Rollins [But Me No Buts had already been rejected]. It is our belief that the authorship question has long been settled by the weight of solid historical evidence and sound scholarship, and that we are not interested in publishing material that seeks to re-open it. Thank you for your interest in 'SQ' [The Shakespeare Quarterly]'. In effect, what the letter asserts is, `We are settled in our comfortable complacency and do not wish to be incommoded by the truth'. That is, like Big Tobacco, they are amorally content with the status quo: they would rather not memorialise the world's greatest poet and playwright, Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland, for they are content with the remunerations of the Stratford ignoramus.
While looking for typos in my proposed second book, I revisited s.121, significant for its historical veracity, attested by some indisputable anagrams (discoverd after the publication of my 2008 book). It is generally considered - particularly by captious Stratfordians - that one can prove anything by anagrams; but one cannot, for letters do not behave with the same predictability as numbers. Anagrams (of length) are very difficult to solve. Sonnet 121 contains two historically significant anagrams in lines 12 (20 letters) and 14 (12 letters) respectively, 'their rancke thoughtes' anagrams `the treacherous knight' (Sir Walter Ralegh); and 'all men are bad' yields `damnable Earl' (Northumberland), reprising Sir Robert Cccil's allusion to Raleigh's `damnable crew', luminaries of the 'School of Night', described by Judith Cook ('Simon Forman, A Most Notorious Physician', Chatto and Windus, London, 2001): "... a loose club or gathering of scientists, mathematicians, astrologers, astronomers and writers, who met under the joint aegis of Sir Walter Ralegh and Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland, nicknamed `the Wizard Earl'". This 'School' was considered by governing Authority to be atheistically - and therefore politically - subversive. LR's critique of this body declares his aristo standing. It is difficult to imagine the Stratfordian rustic being 'au fait' with such secretive threats to the state.
Apropos my 2008 book: it is true that there are in-house faults: there is no Table of Contents (somehow, in transit, it got lost) no Index (I produced 3, but my editing kept muddling the page numbers), probably too many typos, plus a certain naiveté of sexual expression (e.g. too much colloquial `dick'); but I did manage to provide an Appendix of Cryptic Terms, a Bibliography and some Endnotes, and the book has a fresh bouquet provided by its relentless honesty which, after Orthodoxy's mantra, `In duress, suppress' (in effect, `tell lies'), is surely to be preferred. I have finished my analyses of all 154 Sonnets for my second book; but I am again exhausted and struggling with an Intro; and I may, perforce, allow 'Let Shakspere Die!' to do duty as Volume One (to get my second book out before I snuff it!). But, it is mandatory to remember that Lord Rutland - despite his great mental distress - is - often - hilariously funny, and, I do believe I have done justice to his abounding wit. Certainly, LR's love of a joke redeems the obscenities of his Sonnets, and his valiant motives for writing them should always engage our profoundest gratitude and sympathy. Therefore, happy reading, fellow Rutlander, for if you are not now, he will quickly persuade you otherwise...


The Girl Who... Millennium Trilogy (Extended Versions) [Blu-ray] (Digipak)
The Girl Who... Millennium Trilogy (Extended Versions) [Blu-ray] (Digipak)
Dvd ~ Noomi Rapace
Offered by MusicnMedia
Price: £10.89

5.0 out of 5 stars Fine Entertainment, 19 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I've given the trilogy five stars for its entertainment, but, seriously, some of the characters are awfully Gothic. It's all too easy to generate action when the evil of so many characters are lunatic. The murderer of Tattoo (1) is a Gothic monster, and Lisbeth's father in Fire (2) is even more demonically Gothic. The giant maniac (in Hornets (3)), although Gothic, had a reason for his evil - he is incapable of feeling pain. Artistically, the three episodes epitomize how thrillers should not be written; but the cast made it excellent entertainment, and a small, abused female adversary was realistic: the effecting of her revenge, in the person of Noomi Rapace, mitigates somewhat the overall Gothic horrors. I don't doubt the network is planning a sequel. I hope they are - but I shouldn't!


400 x Premium Oxygen Cleansed White Cone Filter Coffee Papers - Size 4
400 x Premium Oxygen Cleansed White Cone Filter Coffee Papers - Size 4

5.0 out of 5 stars Rescue Service, 19 Feb. 2014
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I was in despair trying to buy filters. I couldn't believe that big stores who charge the earth for filter coffee did not sell filters. And then I thought of Amazon and - whizz! - I'd got a year's supple the next day! The filters are excellent with a perfect fit: the best I've ever had. Trouble is - I'm drinking too much coffee! So I've started diluting it - really, there is still a nice taste and it goes down so easy! Thank you Amazon and Connoisseur for coming to the rescue!


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