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Louis Jebb (London, UK)

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On the Move: A Life
On the Move: A Life
Price: £6.64

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A master story-teller's moving memoir, 24 Jun. 2015
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Oliver Sacks tells a case history - medical or otherwise - like no one else. He is neurology's answer to Malcolm Gladwell. Here the subject is Sacks's own life and the stories of love and loss - and it is unsparingly told - are moving and inspiring in equal measure. As good as anything this master storyteller has given us before.


The Guy At The Bar: Notes from a father who lost a lot, but gained a little.
The Guy At The Bar: Notes from a father who lost a lot, but gained a little.
Price: £1.99

5.0 out of 5 stars A moving account of true hope found in great loss, 27 May 2015
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Adam Griffin provides a great guide to finding true hope in adversity.
The adversity, beautifully and honestly described, is the death first of his best school and college friend, in the prime of life, and then of Cade Griffin, first born son of Adam Griffin and his wife Emily, 30 hours after Cade was born with a rare, unsurvivable, condition.
Grief does not come much rawer. And Griffin's account of how he and his dear ones encountered and got through the pain - eating the elephant of bereavement one bite at a time - is elegantly, unflinchingly told.
I would recommend this book to anyone who is feeling overwhelmed by life. Or who needs help in getting the priorities of life organised in a generous, enriching way.
Griffin is great company as a writer. A believable narrator. Honest in his self-appraisal. An expert guide to finding true hope.
I give this book 5 stars because I read it in two sittings, lost in concentration and empathy with writer and subject. It has helped me to recover the habit of reading. What more could you ask of a book?


Contagious: How to Build Word of Mouth in the Digital Age
Contagious: How to Build Word of Mouth in the Digital Age
Price: £5.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great exposition, 3 Feb. 2014
Jonah Berger provides a compelling analysis of how word of mouth works. Full of memorable examples, laid out in prose of exemplary clarity. Great reading for anyone who is launching a new product and needs inspiration in telling their story. And for anyone interested in how society works today. It's Contagious stuff!


Stone Soup: The Secret Recipe for Making Something from Nothing
Stone Soup: The Secret Recipe for Making Something from Nothing
by Bill Liao
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.00

5.0 out of 5 stars A leader for the post-recession world, 19 May 2010
Bill Liao is a true original.
He has taken the philosophy of the internet - the free sharing of knowledge - and created something parallel in the practice of business. What drives him is the chance of empowering other people. And he has pursued this governing credo with great success. Stone Soup shows just why he is a business leader to look out for, one who business writers will look back on in 50 or 60 years as a catalyst for change at the beginning of the 21st century.
In this accessible introduction to his philosophy, Bill Liao shows how, and why, ventures flourish through shared endeavour. The narrative is carried forward by the gradual assembling of the recipe for Stone Soup, in which many parties add different elements to an initially unpromising base ingredient to make a collaborative, and nourishing, dish. This use of timeless parable and an engaging storytelling voice are reminiscent of Paulo Coelho, as has been pointed out elsewhere. Yet there is no wishful thinking on show here. There are instead unflinching case studies from Bill Liao's own experience and some firm principles.
- Disruptive, or negative, influences need to be identified and removed if any venture is to flourish.
- Any decisions taken under the influence of fear or greed are bound to be flawed decisions.
- And, most importantly, all business leaders are judged, in the end, on their integrity. They, and the success of their ventures, stand or fall on their ability to keep their word.
There are plenty of moments in Stone Soup that made me cry out in recognition, plenty that would shame any open-minded business leader into rethinking everything they do.
I studied Stone Soup immediately after reading Jessica Pryce-Jones's no less revelatory Happiness at Work. There is something serendipitous in having these two very different but complementary books appear in print at the same time. Each is enlightening and authentic in equal measure. And each provides a real-world guide to empowering people in their daily lives.
Both books share something of the special character of a classic of self-healing, Ingrid Bacci's The Art of Effortless Living - where intuitive understanding is mixed with experience and scientific study, and articulated through superior expository powers - but applied to healing the working life.
It is a recipe palatable to the general reader and specialist alike.
The joint arrival of Happiness at Work and Stone Soup feels like a special moment in business studies. And a moment well-timed for the intelligent building of work systems in a post-recession world.


Happiness at Work: Maximizing Your Psychological Capital for Success
Happiness at Work: Maximizing Your Psychological Capital for Success
by Jessica Pryce-Jones
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Happiness as an agent for prosperity, 19 May 2010
The double meaning in the title of Jessica Pryce-Jones's book is the first indication of its intelligent, eye-opening stance.
Happiness at Work is indeed about happiness in the working environment - and the benefit it brings - but also about happiness as an active agent for change, as a catalyst for prosperity in all walks of life.
Far from being a hymn to wishful thinking or warmly held ambition, this is a well researched manual for a modern, practical approach to the working life.
Starting from an easily grasped premiss - that a happy worker is a more productive, more creative worker - Pryce-Jones considers in depth how and why this is. Her whole thesis is is profoundly considered, engagingly expressed and anchored in reality. This is not a book about hugs and happiness gestures it is about how pride, recognition and trust underpin everything in a happy working environment, and help establish five crucial components - contribution, conviction, culture, commitment and confidence - in the specific context of happiness at work.
Four things make the book stand out.
- The author knows her field. She swims happily in the latest streams in research psychology.
- The book is completely clear in its goals, and sure in the exposition that delivers these goals. The case studies are intriguing and compelling, and the graphs and diagrams worthy of repeated study. (My own favourite, on page 90, is the "cultural fit matrix", an intriguing guide to identifying the kind of business you would like to run or work for.)
- She and her colleagues at iOpener, her Oxford-based consultancy, have planned, executed and acted on extensive research programmes of their own. And this is freely shared in Happiness at Work.
- Nothing is held back
This last point is what gives the book a special character. It is an exemplar of knowledge freely shared. For a few pounds, a reader receives the fruits of years of consulting and teaching at top-level businesses and business schools. It is truly a work for the open-source world.
I studied Happiness at Work shortly before reading Bill Liao's equally revealing Stone Soup. There is something serendipitous in having these two very different but complementary books appear in print at the same time. Each is enlightening and authentic in equal measure. And each provides a real-world guide to empowering people in their daily lives.
Both books share something of the special character of a classic of self-healing, Ingrid Bacci's The Art of Effortless Living - where intuitive understanding is mixed with experience and scientific study, and articulated through superior expository powers - but applied to healing the working life.
It is a recipe palatable to the general reader and specialist alike.
The joint arrival of Happiness at Work and Stone Soup feels like a special moment in business studies. And a moment well-timed for the intelligent building of work systems in a post-recession world.


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