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Brian-in-Bewdley (Worcestershire, UK)

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ADAPTOR UK TO CHINA, AUSTRALIA, NEW-ZEALAND AND THE SOUTH PACIFIC ISLANDS
ADAPTOR UK TO CHINA, AUSTRALIA, NEW-ZEALAND AND THE SOUTH PACIFIC ISLANDS
Offered by ADAPTOO
Price: £6.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Not happy with Apple devices, 25 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As mentioned by a previous Amazon reviewer, this item has great difficulty in accepting plugs for Apple devices.


Philips Nivea Coolskin HS8060 Moisturizing Rotary Rechargeable Shaving System
Philips Nivea Coolskin HS8060 Moisturizing Rotary Rechargeable Shaving System

4.0 out of 5 stars Good - up to a point, 2 Aug. 2009
I've been using this product for about six weeks now after having taken the plunge and changed over from wet shaving. My previous experience with an electric razor was in 1967, and that was a disaster - so with that in mind I felt I was taking a chance with this. Was it worth it? Definitely yes.

I find that it gives me a good enough shave for everyday purposes - efficiently, and comfortably. For me it doesn't work quite so well with a wet face, but very well with a dry face. (Other people use it in the shower, but for me that doesn't quite work.) My only reservation is this - that had I still been serving in the RAF, which I was for 22 years, I'm not so sure that it would have given me a shave up to 'parade ground' standard. But - I'm now out of the working world, and it keeps my facial appearance just fine. So - worth four stars, but for me maybe not five.

Am I glad I bought it? Yes, no doubt about it.


The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure
The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure
by Diana Cooper
Edition: Paperback

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Little Light on The Silent Stones, 15 July 2002
Having already read a couple of Diana Cooper's works on Angels and Spiritual Laws, I was quite keen to see how she would handle a novel. My first thought, on reading the cover blurb, was that The Silent Stones contained themes and elements reminiscent of James Redfield's 'Celestine Prophecy'. For example, the narrative follows a small group of individuals who meet by 'chance', and suddenly find themselves in possession of a sacred scroll which, when deciphered, will reveal the seven Great Mysteries that reveal the spiritual laws governing our planet (cf Redfield's 'Insights').
The group is very quickly targetted by baddies, who track them closely across three continents throughout the course of the novel, starting in India. From there, the main nodal points are Stonehenge, then Mount Shasta (California), the whole culminating in a final showdown at Machu Picchu in Peru. (More echoes of Redfield here). Each 'chance' event, or meeting, is revealed as one of the synchronicities which govern the universe - the notion that there is no such thing as chance or coincidence - that everything in the universe, meaningful or banal, is choreographed to provide a given outcome: that the universe is, indeed, a giant and (very) complex computer. (Shades of Redfield.)
As new characters are introduced, we are led to ask ourselves 'Can we trust this person? Are they on the side of the angels, or ... what?'. So, an element of suspense is offered which, with the close pursuit of the known bad guys, keeps us turning the pages to see what happens next. There is also (of course) a boy-meets-girl theme, which is introduced within the first few pages, but which develops oh-so-delicately, only 'coming out' towards the finale.
Although 'The Silent Stones' presents as a novel, much of the spiritual detail it contains, and its insights into the true origins of Stonehenge and Machu Picchu, originate from Diana Cooper's awareness of, and close cooperation with angelic and spiritual beings. The novel is NOT a 'me-too' of Redfield's work, and such similarities as there are serve to underline the central themes which run through much spiritual teaching.
I would not hesitate to recommend 'The Silent Stones' to anyone who is interested in spiritual insights - or indeed who isn't, yet. As Diana herself has said, the novel might serve to introduce people to the spiritual laws of the universe - people who might never dream of picking up a book which more obviously and openly speaks of the angelic and esoteric influences in our lives. The events certainly transformed the perspective of one of the central characters - from recently-made-redundant young exec., to fully-committed right-brain-oriented spiritual groupie. Much like myself, I guess!


The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure
The Silent Stones: A Spiritual Adventure
by Diana Cooper
Edition: Paperback

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Little Light on 'The Silent Stones'., 10 July 2002
Having already read a couple of Diana Cooper's works on Angels and Spiritual Laws, I was quite keen to see how she would handle a novel. My first thought, on reading the cover blurb, was that The Silent Stones contained themes and elements reminiscent of James Redfield's 'Celestine Prophecy'. For example, the narrative follows a small group of individuals who meet by 'chance', and suddenly find themselves in possession of a sacred scroll which, when deciphered, will reveal the seven Great Mysteries that inform the spiritual laws governing our planet (cf Redfield's 'Insights').
The group is very quickly targetted by baddies who, starting in India, track them closely across three continents as the novel progresses. After India, the main nodal points are Stonehenge, and then Mount Shasta (California), the whole culminating in a final showdown at Machu Picchu in Peru. (More echoes of Redfield here). Each 'chance' event or meeting along the way is revealed as one of the synchronicities which govern the universe - the notion that there is in fact no such thing as chance or coincidence - that everything in the universe, meaningful or banal, is choreographed to provide a given outcome: that the universe is, indeed, a giant and (very) complex computer. (Shades of Redfield.)
As new characters are introduced, we are led to ask ourselves 'Can we trust this person? Are they on the side of the angels, or ... what?'. So, an element of suspense is offered which, along with the very close pursuit by the known bad guys, keeps us turning the pages to see what happens next. There is also (of course) a boy-meets-girl theme, which is introduced within the first few pages, but which develops oh-so-delicately, only coming to a head towards the finale.
Although 'The Silent Stones' presents as a novel, much of the spiritual detail it contains, and its insights into the true origins of Stonehenge and Machu Picchu, originate from Diana Cooper's awareness of, and close cooperation with angelic and spiritual beings. The novel is NOT a 'me-too' of Redfield's work, and such similarities as there are serve to underline the central themes which run through much spiritual teaching.
I would not hesitate to recommend 'The Silent Stones' to anyone who is interested in spiritual insights - or indeed who isn't, yet. As Diana herself has said, the novel might serve to introduce people to the spiritual laws of the universe - people who might never dream of picking up a book which more obviously and openly speaks of the angelic and esoteric influences in our lives. The events certainly transformed the perspective of one of the central characters - from recently-made-redundant young exec., to fully-committed right-brain-oriented spiritual groupie. Much like myself, I guess!


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