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Sir Furboy (Aberystwyth, UK)

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Trademarket® New Replacement Battery for Iphone 4 S with Repair Tools kit for Apple iPhone
Trademarket® New Replacement Battery for Iphone 4 S with Repair Tools kit for Apple iPhone

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Product may be okay when it turns up, but ..., 28 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Product may be okay when it turns up, but it is still on h ocean between here and China, and I had no idea that it was going to take over a month to deliver when I chose the fast free UK delivery option. It took a bit of detective work to discover that the seller was in China (the only clue being that on their detailed seller page, their phone number as a Chinese country code). This seems to be a common problem with market place, so check the seller carefully or the delivery estimate after you have ordered rather than taking the fast delivery options on face value.


Wars of the Roses: Stormbird: Book 1
Wars of the Roses: Stormbird: Book 1
Price: £1.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Getting me Interested in the Middle Ages, 22 Oct. 2014
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I have read all of Conn Iggulden's earlier works and a firm fan of his writing. He writes fluidly, creates interesting multi-faceted characters and sets his stories firmly in a historical setting that is entertaing, enjoyable but also quite educational.

Battle scenes are a particular strength of this author, and I often feel myself immersed in the battle scenes. This was true also in this story of a brief naval battle, where the descriptions of how the ships moved and were swept by the seas were very cleverly done. Conn Iggulden writes excellent stories, and this is one such, and highly recommended.

I am a fan of some historical fiction, particularly the classical period, but have not read much set in the late Middle Ages, other than a bit of Shakespeare (mostly for school). My knowledge of the War of the Roses was mostly from playing Kingmaker when I was younger! Thus this was a period I was not very familiar with, and not one I thought myself much interested in. Nevertheless I greatly enjoyed the developing story around Henry VI, his illness and weakness, the loss of France, and the machinations of Richard of Yourk, and have already bought the sequel to this book.

Having said that, in books where I knew the history better, I have noticed Conn Iggulden's tendency to tweak the history to make a better story. He is quite up front about doing that in this book in his epilogue, and you realise, when you get to the epilogue, that the fast moving events of this story actually played out over a longer period. I don't fault him for that, as he has told us what he has done, and this is not a history text book, it is a story, and a good one.

I cannot imagine anyone with the vaguest interest in historical fiction being disappointed with this book.


New GoSea Padded Kayak Thigh Straps
New GoSea Padded Kayak Thigh Straps

1.0 out of 5 stars Not Suitable for Rolling, 30 Sept. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
These look the part with brass fittings, and as long as I was just paddling,they worked just fine. However I tried to use them to roll my kayak this weekend and they immediately snapped on my first attempt. The stitching gave way, roll obviously failed, and although I was able to reverse some straps and tie things together, the straps are nnot up to the job.

If you just wish to stay in touch with your kayak, these might be ok, but then I suspect if they could give way on a roll on about their third ever use, and first ever roll, then they would not last the rigours of repeat use either.


For Apple MacBook Pro A1278 / A1286 / A1297 Replacement 4 Pack Rubber Feet / Foott Kit 13" / 15" / 17" - Brand New
For Apple MacBook Pro A1278 / A1286 / A1297 Replacement 4 Pack Rubber Feet / Foott Kit 13" / 15" / 17" - Brand New
Offered by Mac-Parts4u
Price: £4.99

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Product, Beware the Seller, 17 Oct. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This product is what it claims to be - replacement plastic feet for your Mac laptop. No problems with that, does the job and looks fine.

However beware the supplier. I bought mine from "Crown Trade" but this review could turn up under the same product from other suppliers. Crown Trade seem to be based in the Far East, although they don't tell you that. This means that they will promptly post your order and then you get to wait a month as it makes its way overseas on a container ship. For a small replacement item, this is clearly nonsensical, so you will want to find a trader that is closer to home.

How you do that, though, is not clear. Checking Crown Trade's page, the only clue they are in the far East was that they say they work on HK time - presumably Hong Kong (although the item was shipped from Singapore). It may well be that all the other suppliers of this item are also based overseas, so you may wish to email the supplier ahead of placing the order, or else go look for it somewhere that is genuinely UK based.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 23, 2013 2:55 PM BST


Black Rubber Feet For MacBook Pro A1278 A1286 A1297 13" 15" 17" Replacement
Black Rubber Feet For MacBook Pro A1278 A1286 A1297 13" 15" 17" Replacement
Offered by CrownTrade
Price: £2.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Product as described - Beware the Supplier, 17 Oct. 2013
This product is what it claims to be - replacement plastic feet for your Mac laptop. No problems with that, does the job and looks fine.

However beware the supplier. I bought mine from "Crown Trade" but this review could turn up under the same product from other suppliers. Crown Trade seem to be based in the Far East, although they don't tell you that. This means that they will promptly post your order and then you get to wait a month as it makes its way overseas on a container ship. For a small replacement item, this is clearly nonsensical, so you will want to find a trader that is closer to home.

How you do that, though, is not clear. Checking Crown Trade's page, the only clue they are in the far East was that they say they work on HK time - presumably Hong Kong (although the item was shipped from Singapore). It may well be that all the other suppliers of this item are also based overseas, so you may wish to email the supplier ahead of placing the order, or else go look for it somewhere that is genuinely UK based.


Chronicles of Egg: Deadweather and Sunrise (The Chronicles of Egg)
Chronicles of Egg: Deadweather and Sunrise (The Chronicles of Egg)
Price: £3.99

5.0 out of 5 stars First Rate, Funny and Cracking Story, 9 Sept. 2013
I won't curse this story with the much over-used "better than a book about kids on broomsticks" style comment. All such comparisons are bound to disappoint, and in any case would invite comparisons with other books that this one defies.

Egg, known to his family as Egbert (for his sins, which appear to have been legion, but mostly committed when he was too young to understand) is a boy just touching 13 years old and on the brink of a fantastic adventure that will rip him out of his small, somewhat smelly home on an island aptly named Deadweather. Growing up surrounded by veteran pirates of assorted shapes and missing appendages, and the younger brother of nasty siblings, less aptly called Adonis and Venus, Egg is a boy with a natural gentleness and a love of books. That the only book he read for a long time was "Citrus Cultivation" is hardly his fault. His life changes, however, when he meets Millicent...oh wait, no I am getting ahead of myself. His life changes when his father discovers an ancient secret long buried on his plantation. No I think I had it right the first time - it was definitely Millicent.

Anyway take my word for it, this is a cracking good read. There is everything in this book a young adult reader would want. There are pirates and treasure, twisted and evil men scheming and plotting. There is murder and theft and some shockingly bad food. There are tourists... wait..tourists? Yes really! Tourists. There is a one handed boy called Guts with a penchant for biting people and, oh, more pirates too. And did I mention Millicent?

This is the first book by this talented writer, but it doesn't read like a first book. It reads like the work of someone who can write like a pro, has written Hollywood scripts for some first rate films, and who has a sense of humour every bit as hilarious as JK Rowling or Angie Sage. (Yes I promised no comparisons, but see I am just telling you that this is one very funny writer, and if you don't believe me, check out the letters to his kid on his blog. This story is not at all like kids on brooms. Believe me, it hardly even mentions magic at all. It is not like that).

But yes, the writer has written before - just not books. That is a pity and I can only hope he rectifies that by writing many more, because I devoured this one and so would anyone else.

Age range? Well there is nothing in these books that would stop you giving it to younger children, and in the same way that people can love... er... books about kids on brooms... from age 8 up, this one could also be enjoyed that young, but it is really aimed at the young adult market. As to older readers - well I am well above the target range and loved this, and again in the same way kids on brooms can have a kind of universal appeal, you won't go wrong by giving this one a try.

Thoroughly recommended.


The Burning Shadow (Gods and Warriors Book 2)
The Burning Shadow (Gods and Warriors Book 2)
by Michelle Paver
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting Story, Rich and Unusual Setting, 20 Aug. 2013
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Michelle Paver is a first rate writer, and her previous success with her books should be enough recommendation for this one. However I feel the need to write a longer review, because having completed the book a few days ago, this book has left me hankering for more in a way that is unusual for me these days. I simply have to say something to recommend it!

Before I say more, I would point out that this is book 2 in the series. The first book, "The Outsider" is also first class, good enough that I put this one in my kindle wishlist long before it was published. If you found this review first, don't forget to read "The Outsider" first.

Having said that, the book would almost stand alone. Hylas is trying to find his sister from whom he was separated in book 1, but at the start of this story his journey takes a wrong turn when he is caught by slavers who transport him back in the direction he came from, to a volcanic island where his new masters are mining copper. Condemned to work in the mines, Hylas would come close to despair, but in Michelle Paver's stories, the gods may have a greater purpose, and unwilling as he may be to do so, he will play an important part in it.

I doubt my synopsis truly does this work justice though. Here is why it ticked the right boxes for me though: I have visited the bronze age copper mine on Llandudno's Great Orme a few times in the past, and on each visit I found myself captivated by what I saw. What would it be like to be a copper miner in such a place? We know they used children as miners, but what was life like for such children? I remember walking on the Great Orme wishing there was a book in just such a setting, but it seemed that no one had found a way to make the bronze age sound interesting.

Well now that has all changed, with Hylas and Pirra presenting a captivating pair of protagonists, and the tensions with his friend, or ex friend, Telamon producing a wonderful tension that makes you desperate to know what will happen next.

The different aspects of the culture around bronze age Greece are also well represented with Hylas a poor goatherd and now a slave set off against Pirra, daughter of a priestess and Telamon, a noble born "crow" warrior. The way this unlikely trio are brought together might stretch credulity if we did not see the hands of the gods in this, but the way that Michelle Paver writes it, you never think it unbelievable.

The book is written for children, and I would have no problem with my 9 year old reading this, and my 12 year old devoured the first in the series last year and is now reading this one. However Michelle Paver never speaks down to her audience, and the book is also gritty and realistic.

There is also a lion cub in this story, Havoc, who is an interesting addition, if not a huge surprise that Michelle Paver writes about an animal alongside the human heros.

Anyway this book had me hooked. Bronze age Greece is not a pouplar setting, perhaps because we know less about it. No Zeus and Hades and other such gods here, but the other thing that struck me about this book was that it was beautifully researched. Michelle Paver has clearly studied how animist religion was slowly developing at this period towards an ordered pantheon, and although we cannot know for sure what was believed then, the beliefs put into the mind of Hylas et al., are convincing and well thought out.

Likewise the historical setting shows a lot of careful research, and comes across as believable. The description of the mining is terrifying, and the whole work is educational without ever seeming that way.

Highly recommended. So far this is my best book of 2013.


Warrior of Rome IV: The Caspian Gates
Warrior of Rome IV: The Caspian Gates
Price: £3.95

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Class and Authentic Storytelling, 14 Nov. 2012
I think Harry Sidebottom may be my favourite writer in the historical Roman genre - and that is saying something in such a strong field. His books are fast paced, full of action and adventure and some excellently done battle scenes. Add to that the author's real expertise as a scholar and professor of the period, his decision to avoid the crowded principiate period (Julius caesar to the end of teh 1st Century roughly), and his excellent manner of educating the reader without making the reader feel that they are being educated. Add also the excellent characterisations, the rough humour, and plenty of suspense, rivalry, violence and betrayal and you have a first class series of books. Readers of Conn Iggulden should read these too - no doubt about it.

This is the fourth book in this series, and I am not sure how many the author plans. Marcus Claudius Ballista is a thorn in the flesh to the new emperor - a man that he wants out of the way, and so he is deployed to a far flung regions of empire to restore the Caspian Gates. A mission he is perhaps not meant to succeed in. But first he must get there, and that is a whole adventure in itself.

First class storytelling from a great author.


Ruins (Pathfinder Trilogy)
Ruins (Pathfinder Trilogy)
by Orson Scott Card
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.11

7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Card, 12 Nov. 2012
I loved this book and read through it quickly, as it has everything I have come to know and love from this author. It is perhaps not his best book ever, but it really is a very good read, and this series is as good a place to start reading O. S. Card as any other book he has written. Thus five stars, although maybe only just!

So here is some detail: Ruins picks up where Pathfinder left off, with Rigg and his companions having crossed the wall into a whole new wallfold. The wallfolds keep seperately developing colonies apart, and it becomes apparent that each of the original 19 colonies on the planet Garden took some very different lines of development, and the author's imagination shows through clearly as we are introduced to ideas of just how differently they could develop over 11,000 years of history.

The plot moves on significantly in this book, and Rigg and his companions will truly discover their place in the world - why they are here and what they must do. I thought the plot development was very good.

I noted with Pathfinder that Card apeared to be recycling and re-using ideas from his earlier books and short stories, and this book seems to have done that moreso. It is as though card has taken a whole set of his best ideas and tried to entwine them into a new masterpiece - a book that he could never have written until he had written others such as "Pastwatch", "Hot Sleep" and "The Worthing Chronicles", "Ender's Game" and "Xenocide", and even other less well known books such as "Wyrms". The time twisting storyline is clearly found in "Pastwatch" with Card's clever concept of the conservation of causality. However, despite all the development he has applied since Pastwatch, I feel at this point that Pastwatch was the better story.

There were places where this book got so complex that it was as if the author was himself confused.

Whilst trying to avoid spoilers, I would say one of these was a time when the travellers approach a new location to find themselves greeted by a large group of happy people - several thousand of them "including babies" we are told. So the time travellers go back in time a couple of weeks to avoid the welcoming committee and are instead greeted by two less friendly people.

What makes no sense is it becomes apparent that, whenever they had arrived, the plan was to greet them with just the two people - so why were the thousands there? Moreover there should not have been babies (or at least not more than one baby) amongst the greeters.

This part of the story simply made no sense and it is as if the writer wrote the one scene, then put the manuscript away and came back some time later and kept writing, without noticing the discrepancy. Maybe the discrepancy has some later story element that will become clear in book 3 - but it shouldn't have, because that future should now not exist. It ended up just being confusing.

Another example near the end of the book, Rigg goes back in time to prevent himself doing something that he regretted. But Card gets it wrong here - Rigg goes back to an event in his past that should no longer exist because he had already gone further back and changed that future. Conservation of causality was broken on that one.

I suspect it is all but impossible to write completely consistent time travel adventures. One of the reasons I valued Pastwatch was that there was a story that did seem internally consistent. All the same this one was good despite the occasional discrepancies.

Ruins has all the stuff that makes card such an enjoyable writer. Plenty to chew on, plenty happening, some unexpected twists and some clever ideas. Despite any problems, I highly recommend this series and this book.


No Title Available

1.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't fit a Mac Keyboard, 17 Oct. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Look carefully at the picture and then at your Mac keyboard. Notice how the enter key differs on your UK Mac keyboard.

This item will not fit.

It is also printed with an American layout ( a hash and no pound sign) which is less of an issue, but this item does not for a unibody Macbook, nor macbook pro, nor Macbook air, nor even an ipad keyboard. I did find a cheap generic bluetooth keyboard it fits - I suspect in another country it could be correct - but in the UK it is useless.


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