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Reviews Written by
Adam Finn (London, UK)
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HANES SLIM FIT FITTED T SHIRT - 11 COLOURS S-XXL Large White
HANES SLIM FIT FITTED T SHIRT - 11 COLOURS S-XXL Large White

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Slim Fit T shirts!, 17 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was pretty devastated when I found out that Hanes were discontinuing their T-Easy 4550; those t shirts had a lovely natural cotton finish and a snug fit.

Now we have three options: the slim, the tagless and the beefy.

My suggestion is that given they are so cheap is to try one of each and see which one you like - as a word of warning if you are generally a small - then try the large or medium slim fit t shirt. Unfortunately the cotton doesn't feel as natural as the old t-easy and feels a little more synthetic. Also it is not completely tagless - there is still a wash label on the bottom inside corner that you may want to cut off - for the slim fit shirt here there is also a black tag at the neck.

Despite the short comings of the t shirt compared to the t easy (and this actually is completely subjective - you may personally find these t shirts better and freer on the body) this still remains the best option to buy your t shirts for the gym / social or work use. Once you find your size you cant go wrong in buying 10 inoffensive t shirts for the price of one poorly constructed high street t shirt (that will generally speaking have some cliché graphic posted all over it).


Hanes Tagless - Mens Crew Neck 155 Plain T-Shirt (S) (White)
Hanes Tagless - Mens Crew Neck 155 Plain T-Shirt (S) (White)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Best T Shirts, 17 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was pretty devastated when I found out that Hanes were discontinuing their T-Easy 4550; those t shirts had a lovely natural cotton finish and a snug fit.

Now we have three particular options - the tagless, the slim and the beefy.

My suggestion is that given they are so cheap is to try one of each and see which one you like - as a word of warning if you are generally a small - then try the large or medium slim fit t shirt. Unfortunately the cotton doesn't feel as natural as the old t-easy and feels a little more synthetic. Also it is not completely tagless - there is still a wash label on the bottom inside corner that you may want to cut off.

Despite the short comings of the t shirt compared to the t easy (and this actually is completely subjective - you may personally find these t shirts better and freer on the body) this still remains the best option to buy your t shirts for the gym / social or work use. Once you find your size you cant go wrong in buying 10 inoffensive t shirts for the price of one poorly constructed high street t shirt (that will generally speaking have some cliché graphic posted all over it).


Celestron 93317 Omni Eyepiece - 6mm
Celestron 93317 Omni Eyepiece - 6mm
Price: 19.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Value Eyepiece, 17 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
"Exactly the same mag as a 10mm" says the other review.

This comment is unintelligible and unfair to rate this product poorly on that.

Aperture X 2 gives you the total magnification possible in your scope. Focal length divided by the eyepiece size will give you your apparent magnification.

Whilst I do not have any other 6mm eyepieces to compare to, this works perfectly with my 900 scope giving me 150x magnification. The finish is of a high standard for an entry level eyepiece - there is some crowning which is not a huge issue if the image is properly aligned.


Fisual S-Flex Mini 3m 3.5mm Jack to 3.5mm Jack Cable
Fisual S-Flex Mini 3m 3.5mm Jack to 3.5mm Jack Cable
Offered by AudioVisual Online
Price: 13.49

5.0 out of 5 stars Flexible and Clear, 13 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought these as a replacement for the original cable to a set of headphones I just bought.

The improvement in sound quality is noticeable and has improved the clarity of the headphones. Of course these can be used for a whole host of devices.

The lead is made of sturdy high quality polymer but is flexible in a way that prevents tangling - make sure you select the right length first for your purpose.

This is currently provided by "AudioVisual Online" and not Amazon, but the delivery and after-service was prompt and professional.


Twelve Years a Slave
Twelve Years a Slave
Price: 0.36

5.0 out of 5 stars We Must Not Forget, 13 Dec 2013
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These are the memoirs of Solomon Northup - the book on which the 2013 Steve Mcqueen film of the same name is based upon. The book is a brutally honest and well reasoned recollection of this man's extraordinary story/battle with freedom - a right that, most of us accept as a fundamental right and a means to liberty.

The book serves not just as an important reminder of the horrors of slavery but also as a warning to prevent its return. As Solomon shows, the abuses of freedom and liberty can and will occur hypocritically within states that promote these values as core principles.

I cannot comment yet on the accuracy of Mcqueen's adaptation but it seems that a lot of the reports from the festivals are glowing. Regardless it can only be a good thing that the film is attracting this amount of attention/exposure to the memoirs which are as important today just as they were back in the 19th Century.


Fahrenheit 451 (Flamingo Modern Classics)
Fahrenheit 451 (Flamingo Modern Classics)
Price: 3.59

5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Sci-Fi, 22 Nov 2013
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Orginally published in 1953, Fahrenheit 451 is one of Ray Bradbury's best known novels.

This dystopian novel brings together a collection of ideas that Bradbury had been forming during the McCarthy era in the United States. His concern about censorship was coupled with a handful of other short stories and ideas based on excessive and inhibitive policing and the marginalisation of literature by new media that was blossoming at the time. This is infused with the theory of knowledge transfer within the cyclical nature of mankind's 'development'.

Bradbury sees himself not as a future predictor but as a "preventer of futures". 'Spoilers' (on a theoretical level) inevitably follow...

In Bradbury's not to distant future life moves at a faster and more demanding pace where people have less time to read and seek the perceived ideal of instant gratification - often better achieved through other media. The censorship of books, which is the novel's central theme, was not in fact initiated by the government and for the most part the process of abridging and degradation of book content was conducted by the free market. The state then took advantage of this sea change. In a way it seems capitalism has planted the seeds for the destruction of liberal values.

The suppression of knowledge and expansive thought is seen to dumb down the population which after one generation of success can have drastic conditioning consequences where ethics, morals and perception can be entirely reversed. Conversation and social interaction deteriorate and as a result relationships lose meaning/purpose.

Toward's the end of the book Bradbury talks of the legendary phoenix analogy (the endless cycle of life, death in flames and rebirth). Mankind seems to make the same mistakes over and over again and knowledge and books are the only things that can continue to live eternally if not in print at least passed in our minds (for a book is just a vessel and not the knowledge itself). Continually, the book is infused with the enchanting mysticism of fire and its symbolism of passion, protest and rage.

Beyond suppression of intellect there are some other suggestions of the way the state controls the masses through media but not to the extent that perhaps Nineteen Eighty-Four goes to. Nor does this book really home in on the political motives or sociological ramifications in any detail; I expect that this removal of detail here is intentional as it would distract from his main theme.

Furthermore, where Bradbury may fall short on the scope of his future predictions he certainly makes up for in his descriptive writing prowess. In fact whilst the first half of the book spends a lot of time constructing the ominous society the second half of the book is full of vivid and lucid descriptions of the antagonist's feelings, emotions and personal experience.

Sixty years since its publication this is a concise and powerful novel that, like the best of it's genre, has become more important and accurate today as Bradbury may have wished.


The Universe versus Alex Woods
The Universe versus Alex Woods
Price: 5.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blunt Rationality, 19 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is Gavin Extence's debut novel. And what a talent he clearly is.

In his own words Gavin likes books that "deals with big issues in a funny way"; 'The Universe Versus Alex Woods' is certainly that. It's acclaim in and around book clubs and literary houses should be enough to get you to read this, out of intrigue if anything else.

The book is narrated by Alex Woods, a fictional adolescent nerd. Mostly it seems Alex is an innocent bystander in his own affairs and his disposition is that of stark rationality, symptomatic of his scientific background. A chance event leads him off down the deterministic route of life. Ultimately the book is deigned to lead towards the logical and scientific interpretation of a classical moral dilemma. But along the way Gavin (Alex) flirts with a smorgasbord of subject matters juxtaposing astronomically out-of-this-world objects with bluntly humane and intricate relationships here on this planet.

At times exciting and for the most part highly amusing, 'The Universe Versus Alex Woords' is a quirky coming of age story that delves into determinism, eternalism and the universe. Alex's honest narrative is meticulously detailed and regularly provides insightful wisdom that will have you underlining and highlighting. Whilst (unrealistically) his wisdom significantly surpasses his age the insights of this book are plentiful and affecting.

I don't want to give much of the plot away as it does develop into a neat little page-turner, but the real excellence of this books stems from it's anthropological insight. A book that, if you give it a chance, will reaffirm your faith in human nature.


SwiftKey
SwiftKey
Price: 2.99

5.0 out of 5 stars An Improvement On the Standard Keyboard, 19 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: SwiftKey (App)
There are two main features to this that improves the original keyboard.

(1) The keys are slightly wider and make it easier to touch type
(2) There is an intelligent swipe function that can speed up your writing (this takes some getting used to but in time can become very effective)

In addition the keyboard also collates information about the accuracy of your writing; interesting but generally irrelevant.

For me however I still prefer the touch type method and this keyboard makes this easier.

The full version costs 2.99 at the moment - it's certainly worth using the trial to see if you warm to the swipe method - if not it may be better just to find an alternative keyboard without paying for this function.


Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon's Journey into the Afterlife
Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon's Journey into the Afterlife
Price: 6.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and Moving - But not 'Proof', 28 Oct 2013
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This was a quite unbelievable true story that has clearly had profoundly important effects on this man's outlook on life/existence.

It goes without saying that near death experiences tend to have dramatic effects on not just the directly affected party but also close relatives and loved ones. In the case of Dr Eben Alexander however his experience goes beyond the typical feelings of increased gratitude and appreciation for all the things that make up life.

For Eben he recollects memories of a different state of consciousness whilst in a deep coma. His vivid and lucid descriptions are truly captivating and emotional - it is clear that his mental state was in a place where emotions existed in their purest state. A potentially different state to what we inhabit here on Earth.

The 'proof' for Eben was that he reached this place at a time when his brain was recording no activity whatsoever.

Unfortunately as stunningly powerful a story this may be - (and I also personally believe in a higher level beyond this earth) - I find there are logical holes in his argument that leave alot more questions than answers.

The fact remains that his memories are likely to be very fragmented - there is an argument for example that these feelings he had may have taken up the few moments before he woke from his coma as his brain was firing up again. Also the fact that Eben did not die is of course in itself proof that he did not cease to exist to try out the afterlife. Clearly his brain was still capable of processing worldly thoughts.

I will leave this to you to think about as you read it.

But certainly this book makes you think about it alot. As you read his descriptions of this 'other place' there is an immense feeling of empathy; almost like you can taste that this must be what it would be like to fully exit our bodies and explore emotion and feeling detached from the impurity of our body.

Whilst you will likely ask similar questions from this book it is a wonderfully moving story which touches upon issues that I believe are the most important out of all. Unfortunately it's ironically an area we cannot really find 'proof' of until we move on from this world ourselves.


The Summer We All Ran Away
The Summer We All Ran Away
Price: 3.30

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Captivating Read, 28 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is Cassandra Parkin's charming début novel.

Parkin's storytelling prowess gripped me from start to end in a book that relies primarily on a smart weaving plot. The novel tracks back and forth from past to present in alternate chapters, focussing on a handful of characters. This temporal oscillation revolves around one particular location.

I don't want to give too much away about the characters nor the storyline as I feel this would do injustice to Parkin's own ability to introduce the various quirks of each character. I went into this book with little/no knowledge of its content and I think my experience of it was all the better for it.

Whilst the book excels in its narrative and mystery, it is the overarching themes that present themselves which linger long after finishing the book. Specifically you will find that the book focusses mainly on the ideas of secrets and escapism. The truth than love/pain may torment but shouldn't make you hide yourself away. Not just because other people have their own problems but because this is what makes up the human condition.

After reading this book, I too felt like I had run away.

I look forward to reading more from this writer.


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