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Thomas Murch (The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland)
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Singin' in the Rain
Singin' in the Rain
Price: £5.97

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A soundtrack this good deserves better, 16 Nov. 2011
This review is from: Singin' in the Rain (Audio CD)
The poor sound quality on this CD is regrettable, but for me the real disappointment is that several songs have been crudely edited. For a fan of the film, these changes range from vexing (the first verses of "Make 'em Laugh" are copied and jarringly repeated later in the song) to outright baffling: why on Earth would anyone remove the last line from "Moses"? I had hoped for a soundtrack which faithfully replicated the original songs, and thus was sorely disappointed.


Manslayer (Warhammer: Gotrek and Felix)
Manslayer (Warhammer: Gotrek and Felix)
by Nathan Long
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A step up from Orcslayer, but only a single step, 2 Oct. 2008
William King was actually a decent fantasy writer; he managed to inject a real sense of character and humanity into his writing, with amusing incidents running alongside an interesting plot. Nathan Long has so far prolonged the series in the same manner that a life-support machine can preserve a coma victim: it lives, yes, but actually achieves nothing. The return of previous characters and locations amuse at first, but inferior authorship means that all seems futile and hollow: he takes his inspiration from the King, but does not truly understand what he meddles with. Only a brave fan of Gotrek and Felix will truly find any enjoyment here. If I heard that this series would end in a novel written by Mr King himself, I would gladly read it, but this book left me with no desire to rush out and buy Elfslayer.


Full Metal Panic: Fumoffu - Complete Collection [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
Full Metal Panic: Fumoffu - Complete Collection [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The finest in anime comedy, 27 Jan. 2008
While the humour within most Japanese anime shows tends to fall between truly dire and merely painful, FMP: Fumoffu is far more universal in its appeal. With outrageous violence and frequently side-splitting comedy (not to mention numerous spoofs and satirical parodies of movies, especially war films) this series is the Family Guy of Japan. Worth buying by anyone capable of laughter.


Make Love! the Bruce Campbell Way
Make Love! the Bruce Campbell Way
by Bruce Campbell
Edition: Paperback

2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Funny in places, but only a few, 10 Jan. 2008
All my friends are Bruce Campbell fanatics, and they all hoped this book would make me a convert to the cause. Sadly, "Make Love" is little more than a simplistic comedy - and the actual text in this book didn't cause me to so much as chuckle once while I read it. It is saved, to some extent, by the little graphics that are scattered throughout the book: some were genuinely excellent humour, cunning puns or in-jokes that made me laugh out loud (a rare occurrence for even most professional comedy writers). Bruce is a funny guy, at his best, but having read this I am of the opinion that he should stick to screens rather than texts.


The Blade Itself: Book One Of The First Law (Gollancz S.F.): 1
The Blade Itself: Book One Of The First Law (Gollancz S.F.): 1
by Joe Abercrombie
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A decent debut, 20 Dec. 2007
The very title of this story drew me to buy it: and while the novel proved to be less captivating than the title, it was still very competent. After reading to much David Eddings and JK Rowling, it was a pleasant change to read about heroes that the authors did not want me to fawn over. The actual plot itself is rather standard fantasy fare, and the characters are actually quite bland - I can recall no great moments, witty quips or actual character development, though perhaps my memory is more too blame for that - yet if generic fantasy is your cup of tea, this book is a promising start to the series.


Orcslayer (Warhammer: Gotrek and Felix)
Orcslayer (Warhammer: Gotrek and Felix)
by Nathan Long
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Promising opening, but..., 14 Dec. 2007
William King was, to my surprise as I first read Trollslayer, a good writer - the Slayer series was, I felt, amongst the finest of fantasy stories I had ever read, containing characters that were genuinely interesting... and an airship. Sadly, Orcslayer has neither of these - the new author simply isn't in King's league, and this story failed to grip me in the way previous stories had.
Picture, if you will, two metaphorical towers: one an amusing incident in the first chapter, the other a similarly amusing piece at the very end of the novel. In between these lie wide, barren plains, inhospitable to all life. Trudging from one tower to another basically summarises how I felt while reading Orcslayer. While I would count William King as a fine writer of fantasy, Nathan Long lacks his skill: decent characters are rendered somewhat bland and the plots are lacking in lustre, leaving me with the overall impression that the Slayer series has fallen over and badly twisted its ankle. A dedicated fan might find themselves loving it, but shall find little given in return: no interesting minor characters, no mind-provoking moments or emotional attachments. If you do like it, you will probably like Manslayer too, but myself? I'm hoping for the return of the King.


Rainbow Six
Rainbow Six
by Tom Clancy
Edition: Paperback

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Should have been an action movie, 14 Dec. 2007
This review is from: Rainbow Six (Paperback)
While Tom Clancy is a passable writer of fight sequences, this bloated book contains relatively few of these - most of it is dedicated to "developing" the characters, an effort that fails spectacularly thanks to poor dialogue. The villains are all insane fanatics, but also massive hypocrites (environmentalists who ride Hum-Vees?), so the reader can feel no sympathy for them; and the actual Rainbow team consists of carbon copies of tough, rugged stereotypical Hollywood heroes. Everyone seems to view vegetarians as insane maniacs, and yet the last decision of John Clark reveals that he is the biggest monster of them all - I would explain, but that would be considered a "spoiler", even though the ending alone spoils the rest of the novel. Only Popov is of any real interest to the audience (indeed, his fate at the end of the novel made me smile) but the rest of this thriller had me wondering why it required 900 pages to tell such a dull narrative. Clancy has some passable ideas here, but - like State of Fear by Michael Crichton - he needs a better understanding of storytelling and character development.


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