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peculiar "andrew_eccentric"

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Threat Session
Threat Session
by Craig Hughes
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.81

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tip Top, 22 Dec 2012
This review is from: Threat Session (Paperback)
This book gave me an orgasm when it fell off the arm of my armchair and fell onto my TV remote control switching the channel to Babestation. Highly recommended.


Alan Partridge - Mid-Morning Matters [DVD]
Alan Partridge - Mid-Morning Matters [DVD]
Dvd ~ Steve Coogan
Price: £6.60

2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you pay for this you're a fool, 9 Nov 2012
I downloaded this from You Tube when it was originally put up by Fosters. So I've got it all for free. If you didn't do the same then you must now feel like Alan when he can't find his driving gloves. Whereas I feel like Michael after he went to Cardiff, had full sex with a woman and came back on the coach.

A-HA!!!!!!!
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 29, 2012 12:56 PM GMT


Aluminium Foil 18" (450mm x 75m) - industrial size for your kitchen or professional establishment
Aluminium Foil 18" (450mm x 75m) - industrial size for your kitchen or professional establishment
Offered by Noble Express Catering Supplies
Price: £11.82

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful, 2 April 2011
I use this lovely foil to make my own solar panels. You should see my house with 75 metres of silver loveliness on the roof. When it's dark I cook bacon on it.


The Singles 86-98
The Singles 86-98
Offered by westworld-
Price: £19.98

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Music for Thinkers, 21 Sep 2002
This review is from: The Singles 86-98 (Audio CD)
The best thing that ever happened to Depeche Mode was that Vince Clarke (later of Erasure, amongst others) left the group. This is not to besmirch Mr Clarke who, with the aforementioned Erasure, went on to make his own more mature musical marks. My point is that this allowed Martin Gore to step up to the plate, something that might never have happened had Clarke remained. Gore took over songwriting duties from Clarke and by 1986, the chronological beginning of this CD, he had developed into something of a mature and classic writer of hard-edged, pulsating electro-pop with the odd touch of broodiness. There had been flashes before with such tracks as "People are People", "Everything Counts" (which makes a "live" reappearance here), "Master and Servant" and "Blasphemous Rumours" but in the years 1986-1998 the mature Martin Gore emerges and Depeche Mode produced their most musically impressive work.
Primary among this work are "Personal Jesus" and "Condemnation". They serve as examples of what seems to be Gore's existential search for meaning in life. Alternatively, they are just good music. There has been specuation over the years as to what sort of music Depeche Mode actually produce. The terms "industrial" or "electro-pop" make some sense yet, ultimately, they remain inadequate. I would suggest that they produce songs of complexity and depth and leave it at that. Listening to this CD is an intellectual and thoughtful process as well as a musically enjoyable one.


Ecclesiastes (Old Testament Library)
Ecclesiastes (Old Testament Library)
by James L. Crenshaw
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absurd but not Vain, 18 Mar 2002
James L Crenshaw writes a commentary on Ecclesiastes which fully takes on the latter's skepticism towards the world, that keeps fully in view the discrepancy between the vision of a just world and a world of experience all around us in which justice sometimes is just not done. There is no escaping this conclusion and neither Crenshaw, nor, in his estimation, Ecclesiastes, want to escape this conclusion either. Thus, Crenshaw suggests that Ecclesiastes makes his own skepticism seem "biblical".
Crenshaw's commentary is concise and to the point. There are roughly 50 pages of introductory and background material and about 130 pages of exegetical commentary on the text itself. This commentary is to the point if not overly-expansive and fully attends to the Hebrew text in transliterated form. Crenshaw provides his own translation in English at the head of each section to be discussed, a translation which, in itself, is worth studying. Crenshaw has here produced a study of Ecclesiastes both of substance and that repays close reading.


Word Biblical Commentary: Ecclesiastes: 23
Word Biblical Commentary: Ecclesiastes: 23
by Roland E. Murphy
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £29.50

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A sophisticated and convincing reading of Ecclesiastes, 18 Mar 2002
Roland E Murphy is a renowned and much decorated member of the guild of Hebrew Bible scholars and the reasons why show through in this amazing commentary on Ecclesiastes. Helped by the format of Word Commentaries in general, a format which attends to introductory, text-critical, exegetical and synthetical-explanatory elements, Murphy gives a nuanced, through and stimulating commentary on a most enigmatic of biblical books.
Most helpful to me was Murphy's translation of the Hebrew text and his willingness to argue for it. Set this within a thorough discussion of Ecclesiastes' point and his context, which Murphy provides, and we have what I regard as a model example of the genre of commentary on a biblical book.


A Quest for the Post-historical Jesus
A Quest for the Post-historical Jesus
by William Hamilton
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars An Enigmatic and Intriguing Study, 26 Dec 2001
William Hamilton conceives that historical study in Jesus has reached its sell-by date; Jesus, he tells us, was not a man of our time. In his historical context Jesus is a stranger, an alien, one who does not set out to answer our needs, fulfil our desires or interact with our interests. In effect, Hamilton, acting consciously as a post-Schweitzerian, condemns historical study as a useful project which told us some valuable things but basically confirmed Jesus' distance from us in time and interests and therefore in relevance. The oft heard common-place that historical scholars picture Jesus and see themselves reflected Hamilton makes a part of this conclusion, a conclusion which opens the door to what Hamilton would have us put in the place of historical study.
This, of course, is "post-history" and it is a matter of "Jesus-fictions". The main part of this book, bar its short opening chapter and its equally short ficitious epilogue, a head-to-head between the author and his fictional Jesus, is a survey of numerous literary-fictional Jesuses from late nineteenth and twentieth century literature. We move effortlessly from Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin" to William Faulkner's "A Fable" with many stopping points in between, stopping points sometimes fiction, sometimes novel and sometimes poetry.
Hamilton's strategy is to give his readers a précis of his literary examples. Sometimes he will add to this by giving some comments on his example (as with "Uncle Tom's Cabin" which, for Hamilton, gives us a feminized, black Jesus), comments which usually serve to give us an insight into how Jesus has been appropriated by the book, and its author, under discussion. But this is NOT a book of theory. Hamilton sets out to demonstrate his post-historical point by numerous examples, not theorise for it. This strategy works well, if only at one level. The reader is served up a seemingly unending conveyor belt full of Jesuses. By page 200 the reader is starting to get anaesthetised.
But just when you think that this book is merely an annal of Jesuses past Hamilton goes and springs a surprise on his readers with his own "Jesus-fiction" to round off his book. This epilogue is really a summary, in narrative form, of Hamilton's few substantive points. The message seems to be that interaction with "Jesus", whatever it be called, is validated by the effect it has in one's life and upon one's actions. Hamilton thus tries to blur the historical/fictional distinction, a distinction he had not accepted anyway since "fiction" can still contain truth if not "fact". "Truth" is not to be reduced to "history". As such, the book leaves many cognitive loose threads, items which made need to be worked through at a later date but that is not a bad thing. Pity the book that thinks its finished the conversation. For William Hamilton that could not be, except for those still stuck in the objective historical paradigm where Jesus will, one day, we hope, be "got right".


There's No Such Thing as Free Speech: And It's a Good Thing, Too
There's No Such Thing as Free Speech: And It's a Good Thing, Too
by Stanley Eugene Fish
Edition: Paperback
Price: £15.00

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stanley Fish is after you! Yes you!, 10 Feb 2001
Now, sitting comfortably? Are you a liberal or a conservative? Do you think your views, sane, rational, fair, unbiased or generally decent? Well what if I told you that you are a biased, interested, often irrational and double-dealing individual who rigs debates, fixes the meanings of discourses (and things) and generally configures things to your own advantage and your opponent's disadvantage? OK, you would disagree with me: BUT THAT IS EXACTLY WHAT STANLEY FISH IS SAYING ABOUT YOU!! He does this in a series of extraordinary essays attacking conservatives and liberals alike (though under the post-Enlightenment rubric of "liberalism" in general, that belief system shared by most modern, Western thinkers) for their slipperiness in debate and their use of fake and polemical principles, actually the products of politics (a noble because unavoidable category for Fish). Fish's aim in all this seems to be to drag everyone back to their contextual and historical time and place(s) and to do away with the notion that we can avoid this or retreat into our various cognitive, abstract and universalising hiding places. What is left is what we had before Fish started writing and what, according to Fish, we will always have: political debate, the opportunity to convince your peers that this way is better than that, that this conclusion is better than that one. But, after Fish, we won't be able to do this by appealing to principles anymore since he has exposed them all as partisan and political. So "hoorah" for Stanley Fish's eye opening book, let's build a better world, and watch out, Stanley Fish is after you!


Pragmatism (Vintage)
Pragmatism (Vintage)
by Louis Menand
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.10

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eye-openingly good!, 10 Feb 2001
This review is from: Pragmatism (Vintage) (Paperback)
This book is astounding! It manages to accomplish in around 500 pages the twin tasks of giving a functional outline of the rise and rise of pragmatic thought and also to give examples, old and new, of that same pragmatic thought. The three more well-known "founders" (popularisers) are here in C.S. Peirce, William James and John Dewey along with an interesting selection of more modern pragmatists, such as (of course!) Richard Rorty, Cornel West and Hilary Putnam. One name that is missing from the contemporary selection is Stanley Fish, but since he seems to aim his sights indiscriminately he may be thought to be rather roguish for this sane and coherent selection of writings that the editor, Louis Menand, has pulled together.
In his introductory piece Menand charts pragmatism's birth from the universities of north eastern America and points up some of its distinctives (of which there are very few and deliberately so). This piece is worth the price of the book itself for its clarity, insight and authority. The choices Menand makes in presenting the pragmatic thinkers will always be one of judgment and decision (are the two writings he chooses from Richard Rorty's work, "Philosophy as a Kind of Writing" and "Postmodernist Bourgeois Liberalism" really more appropriate to this collection? I would choose others) and we may quibble with one or two and suggest others but Menand has made his choices and given his rationale and we, as readers, can ask no more. What is served up is insightful and powerful (when taken together) as an example of pragmatic thoughts in practice and, as such, demonstrates the oft written thought of William James that Pragmatism "does not stand for any special results. It is a method only." James means that pragmatists don't have to agree to be pragmatic for being pragmatic is "trac[ing] out in the imagination the conceivable practical consequences.....of the affirmation or denial" (C.S. Peirce) of whatever belief, truth or proposal you have in mind. Thus, we realise that Pragmatism as a philosophy is at least contextual, subjective and case by case. As a reader in Pragmatism this book does a superb job of this and Menand, as editor, is to be congratulated. Much recommended.


Deconstructing Jesus
Deconstructing Jesus
by Robert M. Price
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £25.62

6 of 27 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Frozen Stir-Fry Served Up Yet Again, 3 Dec 2000
This review is from: Deconstructing Jesus (Hardcover)
"Deconstructing Jesus" presents, once more, the thesis that even if Jesus did exist, which no one can be sure about, what we can know about him is virtually nothing and useful for even less. Thus, historical Jesus scholars are little short of ventriloquists animating the inanimate or engaging in shadowplay. By a method of analogy utilizing various mythic paradigms, especially the Mythic Hero Archetype, and the extravagant use of intertextuality, Price wants to show that any specific is really just an example of the general. In effect, everything reduces down in the end and Jesus, in particular, reduces down to mythic categories "without anything left over". Price, seemingly, can find no non-mythical information which might might leave a chink of light by which to describe Jesus as "historical" rather than "historicized". To support him, various theories previously presented, from the "diversity of Christianity" theory of Walter Bauer to the "Christian cult" theory of Burton Mack to the "cruci-fiction speculations" of John Dominic Crossan, etc, are represented and exceeded cheerfully by Price as he aims to present a cogent case for extreme skepticism towards the historical Jesus. We may note here this is not so much "Deconstructing Jesus" as deconstructing Jesuses. (There is no exploration of how historical figures might look WHEN mythicised for example and how this might compare with the presentations of Jesus and what this comparison might demonstrate or mean. Similarly, we might ask Price where we may find non-mythicised characters from the past analogous to Jesus.) But we should not let his presentation of multiple sources and numerous apparently analogous stories deter us from realising that "you get what you see". The presentation of evidence has already within it the argument that what is presented IS evidence for something. Price doesn't get round that and, in his own way, simply argues for skepticism towards the historical Jesus which is fine if you want to do it. But I don't. If you aren't convinced by Burton Mack or John Dominic Crossan then you won't be convinced by Price and "Deconstructing Jesus" either. Maybe that's a good thing.


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