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Chorizo D'Horreur (England)

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Slaughterhouse 5, or The Children's Crusade - A Duty-dance with Death
Slaughterhouse 5, or The Children's Crusade - A Duty-dance with Death
by Kurt Vonnegut
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.74

6 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More lost than Billy Pilgrim, 20 July 2001
I find this book rather difficult to sum up. It was not easy to read but having read all the rave reviews I would feel something of a Philistine to slag it off entirely.
It jumps anecdotally around between WWII Dresden, modern day (ish) America and Tralfamadore and it lost me somewhere along the way. Just as I was getting interested in some passage or other, so it leaps off somewhere else. I guess it works for some people, not for me.
So it goes.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 21, 2011 10:26 PM GMT


My Aim is True
My Aim is True
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £3.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not his best but still a classic, 7 Jun. 2001
This review is from: My Aim is True (Audio CD)
I own this on vinyl and I will get round to buying the CD real soon. This is a classic album! It's a rawer and angrier Costello than the later stuff. Alison has got to be one his best ever, it does not fade with time. Red Shoes and I'm Not Angry are the pick of the bunch, great songs that are still fresh today.
Buy it, I will.


Warlock
Warlock
by Wilbur Smith
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another winner from Wilbur Smith, 21 May 2001
This review is from: Warlock (Hardcover)
Warlock is another winner from Wilbur Smith. It follows the exploits of the now aged (reputedly 200 year old) eunuch Taita who is now possessed of seemingly magical powers. Still something of a wily fox and a trickster, Taita appears to be just a little bit too smart at times, but perhaps that's part of his charm.
The story charges along at almost breakneck speed and yet still captures the atmosphere of ancient Egypt.
I hope there will be a further book yet I fear this is the last Taita will grace the page.


Gothic Blue (Black Lace)
Gothic Blue (Black Lace)
by Portia Da Costa
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not very gothic and not very blue, 23 April 2001
I like the mix of gothic horror and eroticism in principle but it does not work in this story.
Unfortunately a second rate erotic novel and a second rate gothic horror. Can't seem to make up it's mind as to whether it's the Picture of Dorian Grey or Mills & Boon.
Unoriginal and unimaginative - there are better books of this genre.


Sharpe's Devil
Sharpe's Devil
by Bernard Cornwell
Edition: Paperback

28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Sharpe-tastic, 6 Feb. 2001
This review is from: Sharpe's Devil (Paperback)
Sharpe's Devil is a cracking good read. After the relatively (and only relatively) disappointing Waterloo this is a back to basics Sharpe, a real boys-own, gung-ho adventure. It's different from the Napoleonic novels, not quite as gritty, but it has a fast paced story line and a good plot.
There are some strong characters in this too. Sharpe is pretty much the same, as is Harper, apart from now being enormously fat. Napoleon seems to hang over the book like a shadow and I couldn't believe that Admiral Cochrane existed, but according to the historical note he did, and in reality his larger than life persona was even more so.
Cornwell has got it right yet again, a blend of action and adventure in a highly credible historical setting.
Since he did not write all the novels in chronological order I have often wondered how he avoided anachronisms and in this I think I have found one. Sharpe is engaged in what is described as his first sea battle off the Chilean coast. However, as Cornwell has since penned Trafalgar which is set some fifteen years before - I suspect (though I haven't read it yet) Sharpe had some hand in this most famous battle at sea - an error possibly. Similarly Sharpe is amazed that Cochrane met Nelson, I just bet Sharpe has met him too!
Minor criticisms of an excellent book.


Silverhand: the Arcana Book: Vol 1
Silverhand: the Arcana Book: Vol 1
by Morgan Llywelyn
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit too much of everything in this, 3 Feb. 2001
Silverhand is unusual. It took me a while to decide whether I liked it or not. It seems to have a bit too much of everything in it, were-wolves, were-dogs, vampires, cannibals, a stone woman, magicians, hybrid lizard monsters. The list goes on. Some of it is run of the mill sword and sorcery, some of it more science fantasy - particularly the voids and the Bred. The names of laces and peoples seem to be borrowed from everywhere.
It is well written and in the end I did enjoy it. I will be reading the sequel some day.


The Sharpe Series (20) - Sharpe's Waterloo
The Sharpe Series (20) - Sharpe's Waterloo
by Bernard Cornwell
Edition: Paperback

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A great account of Waterloo but not a great Sharpe, 3 Feb. 2001
Sharpe's Waterloo is quite a different book to the other Sharpe's I have read. Sharpe seems to have been written around the events at Quatre Bras and Waterloo, rather than being central to them. If Sharpe was an afterthought, then Harper was lucky to make it into the pages at all. Whilst he is there, he doesn't add anything to the plot, but perhaps Cornwell just didn't want to leave him out. If anything the battles are the central characters.
I still really enjoyed reading this, the writing style still made it hard to put down, the battle descriptions are detailed, gruesome and gripping as any, maybe more so.
Sharpe's feud with Lord John Rossendale and his dispute with the foolish Prince of Orange thread through the story in true Cornwell style.
It's the end of the Napoleonic wars for Sharpe, Harper and a few others, perhaps a fitting one, though I'm not too sure. Still, I am sure that I'll be reading Sharpe's Devil pretty soon, followed by Sharpe's Tiger et al.


Exquisite Corpse
Exquisite Corpse
by Poppy Z. Brite
Edition: Paperback

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very close to the bone, 26 Nov. 2000
This review is from: Exquisite Corpse (Paperback)
I enjoyed reading Lost Souls but this was not my sort of thing at all. Brite's style is very readable and I had no problem getting through it, I guess a kind of morbid fascination drove me on. It's not horrific but it is pretty gruesome, perhaps it is a bit too close to the bone.
The passages set in England betray a lack of research as there are numerous inaccuracies. I'll be sticking to stuff that has a more supernatural flavour in future.


The Grail Quest (1) - Harlequin
The Grail Quest (1) - Harlequin
by Bernard Cornwell
Edition: Hardcover

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Calix meus inebrians, 6 Nov. 2000
Harlequin depicts all the horror of mediaeval warfare in the same way that the Sharpe novels do for the Napoleonic era. Gone are any thoughts of chivalry and knights in brightly shining armour rescuing damsels in distress. Here is the start of the hundred years war, brutal and bloody. Once again Cornwell has done his homework (so I would guess) in creating an authentic period setting for his story following the archer Thomas of Hookton.
I really enjoyed this, perhaps not as much as the Warlord Chronicles, but it's every bit as good as Sharpe and that's high praise indeed. One criticism I do have is that the book is full of rather amazing coincidences and chance meetings, not outrageously unbelievable but if I were a betting man.....
Thomas' character did not however grow on me in quite the same way as Derfel's did, or Sharpe's either. Maybe I'm being a little petty over this, after all Derfel grew over three books, I've almost lost count of the number of Sharpe's I have read. Thomas will no doubt develop in the sequel for which I can hardly wait - hope it's before Christmas!


Bran Mak Morn
Bran Mak Morn
by Robert E. Howard
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Once and Future King, 29 Oct. 2000
"He comes out of the past," broke in a wizard, but Bran Mak Morn breaks out of the pages of this book somewhat less often than one might expect as some of the stories feature him loosely or not at all.
This book was previously published as "Worms of the Earth" and if you have read that already you may be disappointed. I had already bought this book under the old title and mistakenly bought this (again), yet I read it all the same.
Despite these criticisms, this is still good stuff. It's a whole lot better than the Cormac Mac Art stories. Worms of the Earth is a tale told by Howard at his best and I really enjoyed the Dark Man and Gods of Bal-Sagoth (Bran's connection to the last two being somewhat tenuous).
It has echoes of the richness of Conan but doesn't quite make it. Still, if you like Howard it is well worth reading, even if it is again.


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