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A. J. Griffiths "griff164"
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Lloyd Cole
Lloyd Cole
Offered by westworld-
Price: £19.98

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars cole's flawed masterpiece, 30 July 2002
This review is from: Lloyd Cole (Audio CD)
the demise of the commotions seemed to come all to soon to one of the most promising and distinctive songwriters of his generation. although still producing excellent songs like "my bag", lloyd cole seemed somehow less relevant by the end of the eighties. no matter - time to regroup (de-group?). this debut solo effort came with a greasier, grungier image and some atypically rocky songs, songs which, in truth, were only a partial success. despite this, the album is littered with quite wonderful songs - i defy anyone to produce a song written in 1990 as good as either "undressed" or "waterline" for example. the latter (with strong echoes of "like a rolling stone") is a fine way into an amusing game that can be played with this record: spot the dylanisms. believe me, there are loads, but this is no rip-off, just the sound of a great talent doffing a cap to his heroes and roaring back in style.


A Word to the Wise Guy
A Word to the Wise Guy

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "god gave us this leisure to enjoy", 22 Jun 2002
This review is from: A Word to the Wise Guy (Audio CD)
...is the motto of the city of liverpool. a city which, in 1984 when this record was made, was having unwanted leisuretime forced upon it in the form of mass unemployment as well as suffering urban decay, riots and industrial strife, all of which galvanised a face-off between the city council and thatcher's centralised rate cappers. out of this emerged one of the most remarkable records of its era. helplessness and defiance, frustration and rage, bitterness and, ultimately, optimism and reaffirmation are all here in a concept album which has reality and truth at its heart, not elves, wizards and dragons. pete wylie commited commercial (but not artistic) suicide with these truely political songs. "weekends" eloquently observes the irony of having leisure time but no means to enjoy it, "i know there was something" dips into the meaningless inertia of a crumbling relationship and "come back" somehow mixes anger, defiance, motown, hope, guitars and self-belief in the most thrilling of ways. all this interwoven with eugene lange's vitriolic scouse proto-rap rants. weller, bragg, strummer and jones and dammers cannot touch this record. magnificent.


A Word to the Wise Guy
A Word to the Wise Guy

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "god gave us this leisure to enjoy", 22 Jun 2002
This review is from: A Word to the Wise Guy (Audio CD)
...is the motto of the city of liverpool. a city which, in 1984 when this record was made, was having unwanted leisuretime forced upon it in the form of mass unemployment as well as suffering urban decay, riots and industrial strife, all of which galvanised a face-off between the city council and thatcher's centralised rate cappers. out of this emerged one of the most remarkable records of its era. helplessness and defiance, frustration and rage, bitterness and, ultimately, optimism and reaffirmation are all here in a concept album which has reality and truth at its heart, not elves, wizards and dragons. pete wylie commited commercial (but not artistic) suicide with these truely political songs. "weekends" eloquently observes the irony of having leisure time but no means to enjoy it, "i know there was something" dips into the meaningless inertia of a crumbling relationship and "come back" somehow mixes anger, defiance, motown, hope, guitars and self-belief in the most thrilling of ways. all this interwoven with eugene lange's vitriolic scouse proto-rap rants. weller, bragg, strummer and jones and dammers cannot touch this record. magnificent.


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