Profile for VImummy > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by VImummy
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,461,324
Helpful Votes: 55

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
VImummy "VImummy" (UK)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults: ADHD, Bipolar, Ocd, Asperger's, Depression, and Other Disorders
Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults: ADHD, Bipolar, Ocd, Asperger's, Depression, and Other Disorders
by James T. Webb
Edition: Paperback
Price: 15.39

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very useful in some parts, misleading in others, 30 May 2011
The information about the 'normal' characteristics of gifted children is very useful and worth buying the book for that alone. 'Oh, so that's why he does x!'.

The discussion of sensory processing difficulties (the area I'm trying to find out about) isn't adequate, I know it's a complex subject but this has left me nearly as confused about the issues as I had been beforehand. Although this probably reflects the dearth of research about these conditions, this section tends to talk about the conditions superficially rather than exploring them as they apply to a gifted child which is what I'd been hoping for.

A warning: the authors are take a very negative view about autism spectrum disorders and one that's not in line with current diagnostic practice. They suggest that a child with Asperger Syndrome (AS) would be unaware and not worried if they were having social difficulties, would only have a special interest in something very obscure such as deep fat fryers - and that an interest that might be shared with a substantial number of other people such as Star Trek memorabilia would not be typical of a child with AS. Many people would disagree. They say that, for example, being able to tolerate abrupt changes in routine or not being clumsy would preclude a correct diagnosis of AS (neither would). They also say, most ominously, that AS is incompatible with being a successful person and that various well-known people who have been described as having AS, can't have it because they are successful. Ouch!


Converting to an Eco-friendly Home: The Complete Handbook
Converting to an Eco-friendly Home: The Complete Handbook
by Paul Hymers
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.99

27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A very pale shade of green, 16 Mar 2009
I was looking for something about the practicalities of making an older house greener rather than glossy eye candy and was also hoping that this would be more up-to-date than Edward Harland's book as technology's moving on so fast.

This is very idiosyncratic a lot of it is about Paul Hymers' personal taste rather than ecology; leather's never going to be an eco-friendly floor covering given the huge amount of pollution produced by tanneries (and I'm not even a vegetarian).

The thing that is most annoying is his blithe endorsement of greed; he starts off by recommending opening up bigger windows on the basis that 'An eco-friendly home is a home blessed with light.' Going on to devote the whole of the first chapter to how you can have more, better lighting and lots more fancy light fittings than you might have now; he even suggests solar garden lighting. Huh? Since when have we needed garden lighting? And by my calculations, more windows = more lost heat.

He certainly doesn't address any of the issues around under-occupancy and whilst he doesn't like stuff that's designed to break down that's really as far as he goes with consumerism. The section on sanitaryware is a good example of just how shallow this books is; it suggests that you might choose to buy an antique bathtub for restoration and mentions the environmental costs of re-enamelling, it doesn't think to mention that you can also get a perfectly good bathtub from a skip somewhere near you at zero environmental cost if you're not such a fashion victim.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 6, 2011 1:29 PM BST


Independent Movement and Travel in Blind Children: A Promotion Model (PB) (Critical Concerns in Blindness)
Independent Movement and Travel in Blind Children: A Promotion Model (PB) (Critical Concerns in Blindness)
by Joseph Cutter
Edition: Paperback
Price: 30.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The way forward, 10 Mar 2008
This book is revolutionary. It turns the idea of how orientation and mobility (O&M) training for childen with visual impairments should be done on its head.

The techniques for teaching blind people how to use a cane were developed after WWI blinded a large number of young men and it was realised that you can't just give a newly-blinded adult a white stick and expect them to know how to use it safely. These techniques, for teaching O&M, have been developed and refined and most UK instructors have waited until children who have visual impairments are old enough to be formally trained like adults in them before giving the VI child a cane.

Joe Cutter, with this book, says that canes should be given to children with visual impairments at the earliest possible age. He advocates a bottom-up learning style where, instead of being trained in using a cane, a young child can for his or herself what it can do to maximise early independence and learning opportunities with the refinements of technique being saved for later. Cutter advocates the concept of 'age, or stage, appropriateness' i.e. that a child with a VI should be as independent as his or her peers of the same age or developmental stage. He promotes the cane to it's rightful place as a very positive symbol of independence and freedom.

The writing style is not always very smooth, but the book has a heart of gold - it actually sets out an approach to O&M that works for children and is in keeping with our knowledge of child development, unlike more conventional approaches. The emphasis on the importance of passive and active echo location techniques for blind children is great, although it doesn't take the method as far forward as Dan Kish and World Access for the Blind.

The 'permission' to give a young child a cane that this book gives parents, so they can watch their child's independence and confidence flourich, is brilliant.


Making It Work: Educating the Blind / Visually Impaired Student in the Regular School (Critical Concerns in Blindness)
Making It Work: Educating the Blind / Visually Impaired Student in the Regular School (Critical Concerns in Blindness)
by Carol Castellano
Edition: Paperback
Price: 31.95

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book I hope my child's teachers read!, 10 Mar 2008
This is a fantastic book. When it says it's about children with visual impairments (by which it means partial sight) as well as blind children it actually delivers, unlike so many books in this area that drift into focussing mainly on blind children rather than the majority of children with visual impairments who are actually partially sighted. It's also pretty good on children who have special needs in addition to a visual impairment. It is an American book, but it's not really about the education system, more the practical things that actually happen in schools, so it's very relevant to a British audience.

This book is about positive real-life ideas about how children with VIs can be included effectively in the mainstream classroom and how doing so can enrich not only the VI child's education but also that of the other children in the class and the class teacher's experience. It focusses on promoting the child's independence and self-reliance in prepapration for life in the adult world. It's packed full of ideas and tips that enable you to actually envisage how inclusion can work to everyone's benefit. It has excellent advice about the role of learning support assistants and how to put together the right educational package for a child with a visual impairment. Fantastic for anyone involved in the education of a child with a VI, whether in a mainstream setting or not - reading this book left me with a beaming grin on my face that such a great education is possible. Now the only challenge is getting it!


Saving the Whole Woman: Natural Alternatives to Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Saving the Whole Woman: Natural Alternatives to Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse
by Christine Ann Kent
Edition: Paperback

14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I laughed so hard I wet myself, 6 Nov 2006
This book doesn't let anything get in the way of the author's prejudices, especially not statistics which she uses extemely selectively. The lengthy descriptions of surgery are emotive, gruesome and scary. It's just a shame there aren't really any other books out there on this subject or nobody would have published this. There are probably some good ideas and grains of truth buried somewhere in here, but amongst far too much new-age junk for me to want to sift through - and I live in a commune, cook vegan food and quite happily read books on witchcraft.

Her central premise - that pelvic organ prolapse is caused by medicalised/ instrumental hospital births - is unsubstantiated tosh (I had just the kind of birth she descibes as the solution and sustained a lot of damage). Ms Kent clearly already has more money than sense for lots of alternative therapies, months of vacation, remodelling her home, wardrobe and backyard to solve her gynaecological problems - don't give her any of yours!
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 13, 2013 9:31 PM BST


Page: 1