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Welcome To The Monkey House and Palm Sunday: An Autobiographical Collage: "Welcome to the Monkey House", "Palm Sunday"
Welcome To The Monkey House and Palm Sunday: An Autobiographical Collage: "Welcome to the Monkey House", "Palm Sunday"
by Kurt Vonnegut
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RIP KV, 1 April 2010
The idea of describing anything Vonnegut wrote as a 'pot boiler' is bizarre! This marvellous collection of fiction, essays and autobiography should accompany you through the rest of your life. I've been revisiting it regularly for 15 years or so. Vonnegut's prose is quirky and unusual, and deceptively simple (apparently a simplicity achieved by endless revision and honing), but always extremely thought provoking and wise. What impresses me most (and this is a quality of all his work) is his sound moral sense. He was one of the good guys, and I wish he were still with us.


Early Morning Hush - Notes from the UK Folk Underground 1969-1976
Early Morning Hush - Notes from the UK Folk Underground 1969-1976

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Acid Folk delight,, 20 July 2006
A follow up to 'Gather in the Mushrooms' this is the second volume in Bob Stanley's fascinating compilations of underground folk from the late 60s and early 70s. This really is a gem of a CD. 'Sheep Season' by Mellow Candle is a classic of the genre, while Sweeney's Men's 'Go By brooks' (penned by Terry Woods- later with The Pogues) is beautifully atmospheric with stunning vocals. Shelagh McDonald's 'Peacock Lady' is arranged by Robert Kirby who made such a powerful contribution to Nick Drake's debut 'Five Leaves Left', and Peacock has a similar lush feel to that seminal album. The obvious tempation is to wallow in the nostalgia of what we like to think was a simpler and altogether better time, but in fact, much of this music has a genuinely timeless appeal. Anyway, if history is a supermarket I'm currently pottering around the late 60s aisle. Take my advice and pop this one in your trolley and wheel it into your present. If you love Devendra Banhart, Joanna Newsom et al, you will adore this CD and its beautiful predecessor. Can we have some more please Bob?


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