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Reviews Written by
B. Hutchison (Fort William, Scotland)

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Psycho Gran #1
Psycho Gran #1
Price: £1.46

5.0 out of 5 stars Mad, bad and still dangerous after all these years, 25 July 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Psycho Gran #1 (Kindle Edition)
I remember reading Psycho Gran back in the 80s and it feeling like a breath of fresh air, completely unlike any other strips around at the time. I was worried the character and concept wouldn't stand the test of time, but Gran's antics in this new collection of stories are as laugh-out-loud funny as ever.

Each story in the comic is very short and usually pretty simple, but Gran constantly manages to sucker-punch you with unexpected twists. There's a lot going on in the artwork, which only adds to the anarchy of it all.

I can't wait to catch up with the crazy old bat in issue 2 (but please don't tell her I said that).


JARBO Compatible HP 932XL 933XL Ink Cartridges 1Set+1BK High Yield Ink for HP Officejet 6600 6700 6100 7612 7610 7110 Printer (2 Black,1 Cyan,1 Magenta,1 Yellow)
JARBO Compatible HP 932XL 933XL Ink Cartridges 1Set+1BK High Yield Ink for HP Officejet 6600 6700 6100 7612 7610 7110 Printer (2 Black,1 Cyan,1 Magenta,1 Yellow)
Offered by JARBO.
Price: £36.99

5.0 out of 5 stars As good as the real thing, 20 July 2016
Worked perfectly, and can see now difference between the print with these and with the official cartridges. Will order again.


There's a Dragon in My Dinner
There's a Dragon in My Dinner
by Tom Nicoll
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious (Mini) Dragon Tale, 15 April 2016
Read this book to my six-year-old daughter as a bedtime story over a few nights, and every night she literally begged me for "just one more chapter!"

It's a laugh-out-loud story with instantly likeable characters and a plot that races along, and I (aged 38) enjoyed it almost as much as my daughter did. The illustrations are great, and really add to a story that kids of all ages will enjoy. Roll on book two!


A Puppy's Tale
A Puppy's Tale
by Alan Windram
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great tale for younger children or early readers, 6 April 2016
This review is from: A Puppy's Tale (Paperback)
Brought this book home and my dog-mad six-year-old sat down and read it cover to cover immediately. We read together a lot, and she has started reading on her own now, and this is one of the few books she's given the full "ten out of ten" score to. She's insisted we're reading it again at bedtime tonight, and even though she's already given me a blow-by-blow account of the whole story, I'm looking forward to finding out what all the fuss is about!


Doom Rider
Doom Rider
by David Gatward
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scary stuff!, 15 Aug. 2012
This review is from: Doom Rider (Paperback)
There's little more entertaining in fiction than a good old-fashioned Apocalypse, and David Gatward understands that more than most.

His latest novel, Doom Rider, tells the story of Seth Crow, and how he comes to terms not only with the discovery that he is one of the Horsemen of the Apocalypse, but that a lot of people want him dead because of it.

Set in a near-future Britain dominated by a religious sect, the detail Gatward paints this world in is breathtaking, and his handling of the characters - particularly Seth - shows why he is one of the most exciting up and coming children's authors around.

This is a great concept, delivered note-perfect, and full of genuine chills and scares for readers aged 10+.


Casper Candlewacks in Attack of the Brainiacs! (Casper Candlewacks, Book 3)
Casper Candlewacks in Attack of the Brainiacs! (Casper Candlewacks, Book 3)
Price: £3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This series gets better and better, 15 Aug. 2012
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Casper Candlewacks is the only intelligent boy in a village made up entirely of idiots. This is the third book in the series, and it feels as if author Ivan Brett is really hitting his stride.

As you'd expect from the premise, Casper's adventures are of the far-from-serious variety, and the humour by and large feels natural and not at all forced. There's some obvious slapstick, like the food fight and machine that shoots omelettes, but there's a surprising amount of more sophisticated humour crammed in there, too.

My ten-year-old has crowned it the best book of the series so far, and we both hope there are more adventures to come for Casper and co.


Out of The Depths
Out of The Depths
Price: £4.31

5.0 out of 5 stars A spooky tale that's sure to please, 15 Aug. 2012
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This review is from: Out of The Depths (Kindle Edition)
Cathy Macphail's name on a book is just about as close to a stamp of quality as you can get.

In her latest novel she introduces us to her new hero, Tyler Lawless. Tyler is a perfectly ordinary girl with a very unusual gift. She can see dead people.

This would be bad enough at the best of times, but when she changes schools and winds up at creaky old St Anthony's College, the ghosts start to come out in force.

Cathy's characters - even the dead ones - really come to life on the page in this thoroughly spooky tale. Recommended for ages 9 and up, but the easily-frightened may need to sleep with the light on...


The Fury
The Fury
by Alexander Gordon Smith
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scary, fast-paced, and stays with you for a long time, 5 April 2012
This review is from: The Fury (Paperback)
Based on the blurb above you'd be forgiven for thinking THE FURY is similar to Charlie Higson's THE ENEMY series. While there are certainly some similarities in the concept, they are completely different books and - whisper it - I'd go so far as to say this one is better.

Plot-wise there's not a huge amount to add to the official blurb up above. It isn't a book with a complicated storyline, and yet it manages to sink its fingernails into your face right from the jaw-dropping prologue, and refuses to let go until the final page. That journey from start to end isn't a pleasant one, either, and I mean that in the best possible way. We're dragged screaming through the chapters, battered by unrelenting horror for page after blood-soaked page.

Even during the quieter spells, when Gordon is letting us get to know the characters, there's a foreboding cloud hanging over the scene, a dread instinct that, while things may be peaceful now, scary stuff is inevitably looming around the corner. I actually found myself getting nervous at points, and would have a quick glance down the page to see if anything nasty was coming. It's the literary equivalent of constantly looking back over your shoulder when walking home in the dark, and it's a testament to Gordon's writing that he could turn this six-foot-four Scotsman into quite such a paranoid wreck.

Without giving much away, the scenes in which the oldest boy, Brick, is talking to his girlfriend (well, almost certainly ex-girlfriend) when she is locked in the basement were particularly effective at making the hairs stand up on the back of my neck. I could never shake the feeling that the relationship wasn't going to end well and... well, you'll just have to read it yourself to find out. (Hint: It doesn't)

The only part of the book I wasn't 100% sure about was towards the end, when we discover what's causing The Fury. The story took a bit of a departure from horror here and slipped into fantasy, although I can't really think of another way it could have been explained, at least not without going down the well-worn virus/immunity route. It's a much more original explanation than that, but it took me a bit of time to fully buy into it. This is only the first of two books, though, so it'll be interesting to see what direction the second part of the story takes when it is published next year, and I have full confidence that Gordon knows what he's doing.

This is an outstanding horror book, but with plenty to set it apart from the standard blood-and-gore fare: an interesting bunch of characters, an intriguing spin on a familiar concept, and some top quality writing from one of the best YA horror authors in the business. If you're a fan of scares, or just good storytelling, I can't recommend THE FURY highly enough.


The Donut Diaries: Book One
The Donut Diaries: Book One
by Anthony McGowan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On behalf of my 9-year-old: BRILLIANT!, 13 Aug. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I haven't actually read this book, but my 9-year-old son, who I bought it for, just finished it. He started reading it in bed last night, and got two-thirds of the way through before we forced him to switch the light out. Today he finished it, and has given it a big thumbs up. He found it very funny, and it was made all the more so by David Tazzyman's artwork, which we're both bigs fans of from the Mr Gum series.

I've seen this book billed as the British Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and if my son's reaction is anything to go by, it deserves to be just as successful as those books.


The Clumsies Make a Mess of the Seaside (The Clumsies, Book 2)
The Clumsies Make a Mess of the Seaside (The Clumsies, Book 2)
by Sorrel Anderson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Another Clumsies cracker, 26 Aug. 2010
After the first Clumsies book became my 8-year-old's bedtime read of choice, I was doubtful anything could replace it. Then the Clumsies went to the seaside, and he loved this book just as much as - if not even more than - the first. Now he has both of them on his bedside table, and I can't see anything shifting them any time soon.

As with the first book, it seems as if not a lot happens in this book, when, in fact, lots of things are happening. This is down to the author's smooth, often whimsical writing style, which carries you effortlessly through the series of odd and usually hilarious events which make up the plot.

What impressed me most about the first book was that the strangeness and the humour never seemed forced, despite the whole book being quite stylised. The same can be said with this book. You'll laugh, but you'll never feel as if you've been manipulated into laughing by a carefully honed and edited sentence. You'll laugh because ... well, because the author is naturally funny, and because reading the book just puts you in the mood to laugh. It's happiness, in portable paperback format.

Highly recommended for kids (and adults) of all ages.


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