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L. Kalbag (UK)
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Padders Women's Storm Black Waterproof Boots 502 5 UK
Padders Women's Storm Black Waterproof Boots 502 5 UK
Offered by UK.Shoes Retail

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Comfortable but *not waterproof*, 25 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought these boots for walking the dog. I needed something more flexible than wellington boots but equally waterproof. I wore these on a fairly muddy walk, and whilst they did protect from light mud, I walked through wet grass and the water soaked through. When I took the boots off at the end of the walk my socks were wet all around the toes. They would be completely useless in even the slightest puddle.


Moleskin Soft Extra Large Squared Notebook
Moleskin Soft Extra Large Squared Notebook
Price: £12.28

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best notebook for a web designer, 5 Oct. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I'm now on to my third xlarge Squared Moleskine. Each lasts me around a year in pages, but would last a lot longer due to the quality of the book itself.

The size and squared background makes it great for sketching out designs in a gridded format, and the squares are also large enough to double as lines for writing across. The squares are quite dark, much darker than the average school exercise book squared paper.

When it says the book is xlarge, this makes it sound far bigger than it is, as standard moleskines are small. It fits easily in a medium sized handbag and very easily into a laptop bag.

My only negative would be that the back pocket often tears down the sides, but that's probably because I overload it with bits of paper and card.


Everything You Know about CSS is Wrong!
Everything You Know about CSS is Wrong!
by Rachel Andrew
Edition: Paperback
Price: £17.61

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Very disappointing book, 24 Nov. 2008
They've been hyping up this book on Sitepoint for weeks and, after just reading it, I have no idea why.

For the price, I hadn't expected this book to be half as thick as other Sitepoint books, and only really contain information about one CSS property. This should have just been an addition to the existing CSS Reference book/web site.

It is trying to promote CSS table layouts as the new way to layout web site designs, but without IE8 being out until next year, and still needing to support IE6 and IE7 when it is out, the solutions offered in this book (using conditional commenting) makes so much extra work that I ended up wondering what really were the benefits of using CSS table layouts. Having not built a web site using HTML tables for layout before, I find that this layout doesn't seem as logical as the book assumes. I'm sticking with floats for the foreseeable future!

If, like me, you have assumed that it would have more about new specifications to CSS3, rather than just being about CSS table layouts, and you're after that kind of reference, I recommend the last chapter of Transcending CSS: The Fine Art of Web Design (Voices That Matter). It covers far more than this entire book in just one chapter.


Agile Web Development with Rails (Pragmatic Programmers)
Agile Web Development with Rails (Pragmatic Programmers)
by Dave Thomas
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not Good For A Beginner To Programming, 17 Jun. 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I'm an experienced developer in HTML and CSS so I thought I'd try my hand at my first real programming and hop on the latest band wagon of Ruby on Rails.

I boldy read my way through Chapters 1 and 2, having to refer to the web for definitions on acronyms I didn't know and re-read some of the particularly jargon-filled paragraphs that made assumptions about what I already knew thinking "Ok, it seems a bit tricky, but I understand the concepts so I'm sure I'll get the hang of it once I hit the real examples." I didn't even get to the real examples.

The installation section is a real let-down. Using Mac OS Leopard, I am informed that I have all of the tools, I just need to enable them, where it then tells me to go on a load of web sites to look up how to do this. Totally unhelpful. I'm sure that seasoned programmers know how to set up their particular environments and that using Ruby on Rails is just some small tweaks to their command lines and off they go, but I was left um-ing and argh-ing as I downloaded tool after tool and followed online tutorial after online tutorial trying to work out what the hell I was supposed to be doing.

Maybe I'm expecting too much, but I assumed that by buying a rather pricey book that you'd get all the info in the book, rather than having to rummage around the web, and maybe the tools should be included on a disc or to download from a dedicated web site or something?

Needless to say, I gave up and have bought Sitepoint's 'Simply Rails 2.' Having read a lot of Sitepoint books in the past, I'm hoping that this will live up to their standards- I'll post a review to that when I'm a bit further in!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 29, 2008 12:36 AM GMT


Elements of User Experience: User-centered Design for the Web (Voices (New Riders))
Elements of User Experience: User-centered Design for the Web (Voices (New Riders))
by Jesse James Garrett
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars A Vital Read For Anyone Involved In A Web Project, 27 Feb. 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Since the day I got this book, my outlook on the process of designing for the web has changed entirely.

Regardless of the examples, the guidelines and advice in this book can be applied to any design for the web. The book is very manageable, starting off explaining Jesse James Garrett's 'Elements of User Experience' diagram in summary, so that you can grasp the concept, and then going into much more detail of how to plan the elements of a project in an effective way.

It isn't written in an academic tone, which makes this an interesting and easily-digestible read in a few hours and, if you're anything like me, you'll end up dipping into it for advice whenever you're broaching user testing or any similar exercise.

I am only currently a student, but I have the 'Elements of User Experience' diagram on my wall and I use it to help plan all of my projects. This book opens your eyes to so many aspects of user experience that it would be difficult coming away from reading it without learning something new.


Davina - High Energy Five [DVD]
Davina - High Energy Five [DVD]
Dvd ~ Davina McCall
Offered by HalfpriceDVDS_FBA
Price: £7.98

36 of 46 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No Good For A Frequent User, 27 Feb. 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This was the first fitness DVD I have ever bought, and I was very enthusiastic to make as much use of it as possible.

The concept of the 'High Energy Five,' where you mix up two of the sections for each workout, really appealed to me, and this DVD does succeed in having enough variety of routines to not get boring too quickly. The exercises are hard enough to put someone of reasonable fitness into a sweat and they aren't too repetitive. I even find the instructors fairly likeable. I noticed a difference in the tone of my body within 2-3 weeks of doing the warm up, two sections and the cool down four days a week.

HOWEVER, Davina herself has now made it impossible for me to use this DVD. There are unnecessary breaks in the routines where Davina is making a stupid joke (which is incredibly unfunny the 20th time round) and making sickening 'I love you' gestures to the camera. I could probably put up with the weird faces she pulls throughout, but the useless comments she makes 'Why aren't YOU doing the stretches, Mark?' I can now recite almost all of them word-perfectly and that's not the reason I bought a fitness DVD!

So much was my annoyance, I tried doing the DVD with the speech off and subtitles on. Not to mention the subtitles being out of sync with the moves, thus rendering them entirely useless, this really emphasised how terrible the accompanying music is. I never expected to hear music that I liked on an exercise DVD, that would have been asking too much, but the way in which the music's volume fluctuates, so one minute you're hearing the lyrics and melody clearly, and the next minute it's reduced to a dull throbbing, is just bizarre.

If you're the kind of person that buys a fitness DVD to use a few times just because it's the latest fad or you're going to mix it up with some other DVDS, then this is the purchase for you.

If you really genuinely want a fitness routine then I wouldn't buy this DVD. As good as it is, Davina McCall will drive you mad, so much so that you end up screaming 'Not here as well!' at the TV whenever the Garnier advert comes on.
Comment Comments (10) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 19, 2010 2:41 PM GMT


Transcending CSS: The Fine Art of Web Design (Voices That Matter)
Transcending CSS: The Fine Art of Web Design (Voices That Matter)
by Andy Clarke
Edition: Paperback
Price: £35.99

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A bible masquerading as a coffee table book, 4 Jun. 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
One thing this book is certainly not lacking in is photography. Very irritating at the beginning as you're hit by single, and even double, pages of full bleed irrelevant images when you're just trying to get on with the read.

Fortunately, from the Inspiration section onwards, the images included are more relevant and it blossoms from a good book to a bible. Andy Clarke really hits home his points about taking inspiration from off-screen and the forward thinking to CSS3 really gives meaning to the transcendence.

This is not a book for beginners! There are enough examples to illustrate each point well, but lacks clear justification behind a lot of the code. I have a fairly solid knowledge of CSS, but I did find some of his examples, whilst having strong concepts, were a bit vague. I wouldn't personally use this for reference so much; Dan Cederholm's Web Standards Solutions and/or Bulletproof Web Design are better for reference.

Definitely advisable for those losing hope with lack of browser compatibility, Clarke's attitude is exemplary to the lot of us!


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