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Elliott's Funky Cleaning Plastic Laundry Basket, Pink
Elliott's Funky Cleaning Plastic Laundry Basket, Pink

1.0 out of 5 stars Broken already after about three uses., 8 Oct 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The washing basket was great when it came, but as the title of my review says the handle has snapped already. It wasn't overfull or used for anything other than washing so can only assume is just shoddy. Will be asking for refund.


15 x Ultra Early - 10mIU Wide Width Pregnancy Test Strips (tests up to 6 days earlier)
15 x Ultra Early - 10mIU Wide Width Pregnancy Test Strips (tests up to 6 days earlier)
Offered by Home Health (UK) Ltd
Price: £5.60

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great product, 7 Aug 2012
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These are a good price, with excellent instructions. Although not as easy to use as mid-stream they are certainly not difficult. For people trying to conceive that may need to test a few times each month this product is a good choice.


Wicker
Wicker
by Kevin Guilfoile
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Odd but good., 20 Feb 2012
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This review is from: Wicker (Paperback)
I finished this book last night in the small hours after being unable to put it down, this is particularly odd as I didn't think much of the first half and was considering abandoning it. The idea of the vengeful doctor using the DNA of his daughters murderer (which he conveniently and accidentally received from the police with her personal effects) to clone the killer was both mental and brilliant. However, the book seemed to meander around the point for quite a while without very much pace or progression until the part with the video game began which was even more original and weird than the main premise of the novel. It is quite silly and melodramatic in places but also quite depressing. The ending is pretty good and I kept thinking about it for a while afterwards as it was quite sad and quite surprising and I'm glad I continued reading. For something that was on the surface a pretty easy read and a bit daft it actually posed some pretty good moral questions by the end.


Fever Of The Bone: 6 (Tony Hill)
Fever Of The Bone: 6 (Tony Hill)
by Val McDermid
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Worked it out by page 168 and i'm definitely no detective., 7 Feb 2012
Okay, to be fair, I worked out the connection but not precisely why, it was enough to remove the surprise element of the ending which makes these type of crime novels so readable. A good read on the whole but did skim some parts which were quite waffly about Arthur/Edmund and some of the dialogue was a bit cheesey. It was alright, nothing amazing, you know what you're going to get with Val McDermid.


Lasting Damage (Culver Valley Crime)
Lasting Damage (Culver Valley Crime)
by Sophie Hannah
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing read by an author I usually love., 28 Oct 2011
Lasting Damage starts as other Sophie Hannah books do - a puzzle, a shock, confusion, usually a situation where something has happened that just cannot be, in this case a woman, for reasons we do not yet know, is obsessed with a certain address and seeing the house is for sale goes on the estate agents website to have a snoop around the pictures and virtual tour. Instead of satisfying her curiosity she sees a gruesome murder scene - but when she calls her husband to come and look, the image has vanished.
So far so usual, the domestic setting, fragile heroine, exploration of the dynamics, frailties and politics of family - the puzzling but telling details Hannah slips in to the the plot to lead to the usually clever and surprising reveal at the end. Just...not so much with this one. I read it in a few days as usual, the plot was interesting, the premise very clever but its as if the tangled knots the characters have to untie to reach the conclusion have become something Sophie Hannah felt had to become so complex it was almost impossible to understand the ending. Too many characters are introduced and then become superfluous to the plot, there are too many coincidences to be plausible (and plausible is one reason why I find her books so unsettling)and the main character Connie is so unlikeable, a hysterical obsessive with a tendency to proclaim that she'd forgive her husband anything including adultery, bigamy, murder..I felt myself saying 'oh just grow a pair Connie and demand some answers' The husband Kit is not the clever psycho it is hinted at he may be but a stupid, vain, indecisive, needy, spoilt man - which is why I found the end totally implausible, I just couldn't imagine that character doing what he did no matter what pressure he was under.
I suppose my review would be - for me, not as good as her earlier books, she has an amazing imagination and the Simon Waterhouse character is definitely an interesting one but on the whole Sophie Hannah seems to assume she needs to ramp up the complexity of each book to continue to appeal when really all she needs to do is continue as she was, as on the whole her books are brilliant.


Kiss And Tell
Kiss And Tell
by Fiona Walker
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.39

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Looooooooooong Winded., 5 Sep 2011
This review is from: Kiss And Tell (Paperback)
I think I have summed up my general view of this book in the title. Its a shame as I was really looking forward to reading this, I'd read another of Fiona Walkers book previously and absolutely loved it ('Kiss Chase', same idea; posho complicated love affairs) Kiss and Tell however, I feel like the story is in real time and i'm haunting the place whilst being forced to observe every meal cooked and eaten, every shower taken and every time a dog eats something it shouldn't (as well as every angsty moment and domestic row). Most of the characters are odious and I had little sympathy for them, bratty, spoilt and and stuck-up and pretty massively cliched too most of the time, it's hard to care about what happens to them, also, horsey, far far too horsey even for a book mainly about horsey types. Plus, sack the proof-reader! 'Your' and 'You are' are not interchangeable and even basics such as getting the names right of the characters are overlooked.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 10, 2011 1:43 PM BST


The Bed I Made
The Bed I Made
by Lucie Whitehouse
Edition: Paperback

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Meh, 15 July 2011
This review is from: The Bed I Made (Paperback)
This book started quite well, got frustrating - why didn't she tell someone or go to the police when she realised she was in danger? - and if the answer to this is because she likes to think of herself as an independent woman who can sort out her own problems without running screaming into the arms of the nearest man, then why does the book have such a rushed, clichéd and slightly sexist ending? I saw that coming a mile off. Apart from that it was overly descriptive and rambling at times, I lost the thread of what was going on and some parts seemed totally unbelievable such as her friend suddenly becoming distant to her and very predictably involved with him - did she have a personality transplant while Kate was away?. It was alright but the ending was half-arsed to say the least.


Apartment 16
Apartment 16
by Adam Nevill
Edition: Paperback

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Creepy but repetitive - the suspense is not maintained., 6 May 2011
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This review is from: Apartment 16 (Paperback)
*some spoilers*
This book was initially one of those I had to put down and read something a bit lighter before I went to sleep, brilliantly creepy, descriptive and imaginative it was the horrors of urban life, helplessness and the trap of poverty and misery that disturbed me as much as the haunted house story. The many eccentricities of the British elderly and rich living in seclusion in a well off corner of London through the eyes of a young American and a disillusioned young artist was great, and the glimpses which could have been supernatural or a symptom of a distressed or disturbed mind were brilliant. However, I definitely do agree the book was repetitive, if the big reveal -what actually was in Apartment 16 had not been done so early or in such thorough detail and saved until the denouement it would have been much much better, the descriptions of the suffering and the mangled flesh became so commonplace it no longer had any impact by the slightly confusing end. It reminded me of The Shining, (which is fine as that's a suspenseful delight of a horror novel), especially considering Seth's ultimate fate, (which was fairly early on always going to have to be the outcome) and also the film Poltergeist, which is less of a compliment. The constant and somewhat half-arsed wittering about nazi's and vortexes and portals diminished it for me, more mystery and less attempt at explanation would have been better. The child and the relation to the other porter honestly did appear to have been a last minute addition to the story to tie up a few loose ends, as it didn't seem to have anything to do with the rest of the plot except slightly because he couldn't just leave the job until he had a replacement to take on the curse of Barrington House because his wife had been looking for their dead son? Something like that?(again, very much like The Shining). On the whole I enjoyed it, bits were fantastic and others sound like the script from a schlocky hammer horror.


The Lessons
The Lessons
by Naomi Alderman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.39

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 22 April 2011
This review is from: The Lessons (Paperback)
I picked this up at the library, sounded pretty good and the mention of it being reminiscent of Donna Tartt on the back is what swung it, and I ended up reading this in a night. The author clearly has read Brideshead Revisited, The Secret History and Past Imperfect type privileged, partying student type novels and it does show but it was darker and sadder than I imagined it was going to be. The characters were largely odious and selfish but it was believable.


Change of Heart
Change of Heart
by Jodi Picoult
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not finishing it!, 12 April 2011
This review is from: Change of Heart (Paperback)
I started this last night and read a fair bit of it, having read some of her books before (usually when nothing else to read for whatever reason) I knew the general moral/medical sobfest type issues she writes about. What was different about this one was quite early on I saw (as others clearly have) a huge similarity with The Green Mile by Stephen King. Ridiculously similar in fact. The simpleton perpetrator, death row, bringing foundling pets back to life, the sympathetic guard who has a family member restored to full health after a close brush with death all seemed like outright plagiarism then one of the characters calls the murderer 'green mile' and I thought it was possibly deliberate. After reading a little more I honestly don't care...yes, yes, Religion is a personal choice, the death penalty is a bad thing and so is stealing the plot of other peoples books and hoping they haven't read the original. I'll leave her books well alone in future for definite.


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